Posts Tagged ‘senior_projects’

Biomedical engineering juniors present projects to industry

January 10th, 2017

2017_news_BE_presentations2Jan. 10, 2017 — Biomedical engineering students had an opportunity to network with industry professionals when MSOE hosted the annual December seminar of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Milwaukee Section.

IEEE is the world’ largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity. The Milwaukee Section serves southeast Wisconsin and is run by volunteers of industry and academia. The December seminar was held in conjunction with MSOE’s annual Junior Biomedical Engineering Feasibility presentations, an event that showcases the status of current design projects by the biomedical engineering class of 2018.

“The Milwaukee Section holds events throughout the year to promote technical and professional growth and networking,” said Dr. Jeffrey LaMack, director of the biomedical engineering program. “The December seminar was created in 2012 with the specific purpose of combining it with our student presentations for a larger joint event.”

This year, 10 student teams made the case for the feasibility of their proposed capstone design projects, which ranged from head impact monitors for soccer plays to open source software framework for medical device applications.

2017_news_BE_presentations1IEEE members were invited to attend the student presentations and students were invited to attend the IEEE dinner that followed. A highlight of the event was an address by Dr. John G. Webster who is widely regarded as one of the founders of biomedical engineering; textbooks written by Webster are used in MSOE’s biomedical engineering curriculum.

“The IEEE event allows for people in a very diverse industry to get together and share ideas for the betterment of the IEEE community as a whole,” said Thomas Reid ’18, a junior biomedical engineering student. “It is a great environment for learning and sharing experiences.”

Reid was among the 40-plus students presenting at the 2016 event, which took place Dec. 14.

Most MSOE students don’t start thinking about their senior project, much less making a public presentation, until the senior year. In the biomedical engineering program it’s a little different.

“The capstone design sequence begins earlier for BME students because of the considerations involved in medical design,” said LaMack. “FDA regulations, market analysis, and user needs based on conversations with clinicians and patients are all part of their process.”

The presentations not only give students an opportunity to practice the communication skills the industry values, but they also serve as a  starting point for business plan proposal competitions students may enter. “Winnings from such competitions have funded several of our projects over the years,” LaMack said.

Being able to discuss their presentations with industry professionals throughout the evening is an invaluable opportunity for students. “It was helpful to have experienced engineers give us suggestions about what might work and what definitely will not,” said senior Rose Buchmann ’17, who presented with her team in 2015. “They saved us a lot of trouble by avoiding problems that were obvious to more experienced engineers. They also had the knowledge to explain the reasoning behind their ideas and opinions, which helped us learn what variables to consider when discussing design.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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Class of 2015 shows their designs for the future

May 11th, 2015

Senior Design 2014_181.jpgFriday, May 22 is Senior Project Day at MSOE and more than 80 projects will be on display at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Throughout their senior year, MSOE students collaborate with classmates on a final project related to their degree program. It’s an opportunity for them to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. The projects are often sponsored by companies looking to solve a problem, and others are driven by a student’s interests.

School of Nursing – 10 a.m. to Noon – Campus Center, Ruehlow Nursing Complex
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department – 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Walter Schroeder Library and Werwath Mall
Physics and Chemistry Department – 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Campus Center, second floor
Mechanical Engineering Department – Noon to 3 p.m. – Todd Wehr Auditorium

A complete list of projects can be downloaded here.

TruckMuncher
Food trucks are all the rage right now, and it’s never been easier to find one nearby thanks to TruckMuncher, an app designed by software engineering majors. TruckMuncher locates the nearest trucks and also lets users find their favorite trucks and view their menus. Location: Werwath Mall

Car Seat Alert System
Prevent childhood heatstroke and possibly death by using this car seat alert system designed by electrical engineering technology majors. Using three sensors, if there is a child in the vehicle, a buzzer will alert the driver when the ignition is turned off so that the child is not left behind. Next, a signal is sent to make the key fob vibrate, and if within 30 seconds, the sensors still detect a child in the seat, the vehicle’s horn will sound. Location: Library

Electric Wind Chime
Let the wind determine your music choices. Electrical engineering students developed a magnetic mechanism that simulates the operation of a wind chime. A microprocessor senses wind speed and plays a song to the rhythm of the wind. Users load songs into the device and can relax while their favorite songs play with the pleasant sounds of a wind chime. Location: Library

Striped Hat Brigade
A team of computer engineering and software engineering students teamed up to design a virtual presence device. An iPad mounted on a robot chassis allows someone with an iPad or iPhone to communicate via a video feed with people in different location—something that could be useful in a hostage or disaster situation. Location: Library

SAE Formula Hybrid Vehicle
See the car that took fourth place in the world and first in the United States! MSOE’s team of electrical and mechanical engineering majors designed, built and competed their high-performance hybrid vehicle at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway. Location: Campus Center, outdoors

Legionnaires Detection Kit
In 2010, Legionnaires disease affected the Milwaukee area and was traced back to a decorative water fountain in a local hospital. While tests exist to detect Legionella, they are costly, time-consuming and sometimes unable to differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic forms of the bacteria. Biomolecular engineering majors developed an inexpensive, multi-phase kit capable of rapidly detecting the bacteria while adhering to industry regulations and standards. Location: Campus Center, second floor

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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Biomedical engineers show projects at Medical College

February 25th, 2015

In February 2015, senior biomedical engineering students were asked to present posters describing their senior projects at Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). All students at MSOE participate in a senior project, which are a culmination of all they’ve learned in their time at MSOE. Biomedical engineering students begin their senior capstone project at the end of their sophomore year. By senior year they put what they’ve learned to work and complete their capstone project by applying quantitative analysis and systematic synthesis to develop a prototype product for a real-world application.

This year’s projects include:

MCW_Spina.jpgIn Utero Spina Bifida Cystica Repair System
Team: Cody Dziuk, Ayushman Rai and Nik Stasinopoulos
The purpose of this project is to create a toolbox of approaches for a biomaterial delivery system for use in the in utero repair of spina bifida. The minimally invasive device will be used to deliver a protective biomaterial to cover the exposed spinal cord of the fetus while it is in the womb. This toolbox will be given to Amy Wagner, MD at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to use when the final biomaterial is chosen by her team. To show that the device is functional with a mock material, a mock uterus will be created to simulate the surgery.

 

 

 

Total Knee Replacement Sizing ToolBE_Poster_Froedtert.JPG.jpg
Team: Garrison Glowniak, Enyinnaya Okwulehie, Travis Pischel (ME major) and Alexandra Swanson
The goal of this device is to make the knee replacement process more universal and help decrease the number of revision surgeries needed to correct for improper fit and alignment of knee implants. This measuring device will be used to measure the medial and lateral gaps that occur between the tibial plate and femoral component prior to the implant trial being completely installed by spreading two prongs until they come in contact with the femoral component to see what size trial is needed. Currently, the practice of fitting an implant involves a hands-on, trial and error approach, in which the surgeon manipulates the knee to simulate the typical range of motion. This process often leads to an implant size change, which requires the surgeon to remove the current trials, recut the bones, and install a new size trial, which adds a substantial amount of time.

MCW_Rat.jpgTraumatic Brain Injury Research Device
Team: Alex Jandrin, Ryan Damask, Amy Gustafson and Andrea Winegar
This project involves creating a helmet-like device used with an energy delivery device to induce traumatic brain injury in rats. The helmet will be able to transfer energy to induce injury in the coronal, sagittal and transverse planes. The helmet will also minimize the slip between the device and the rat’s skull during energy transfer. The helmet design will allow for the user to be able to set up testing in a short amount of time without harming the rat. The helmet will attach to the pneumatic energy delivery device that will cause a specific degree of head injury.

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Class of 2014 shows their designs for the future

May 23rd, 2014

Friday, May 23 is Senior Project Day at MSOE and more than 80 projects will be on display at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Throughout their senior year, MSOE students collaborate with classmates on a final project related to their degree program. It’s an opportunity for them to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. The projects are often sponsored by companies looking to solve a problem, and others are driven by a student’s interests.

  • School of Nursing – 10 a.m. to Noon – Student Life and Campus Center, Ruehlow Nursing Complex
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department – 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Walter Schroeder Library and Werwath Mall
  • Physics and Chemistry Department – 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Student Life and Campus Center, second floor
  • Mechanical Engineering Department – Noon to 3 p.m. – Todd Wehr Auditorium

 

A complete list of projects can be downloaded here (PDF).

Here is a short list of examples:

Formula Hybrid Race Car
Unique features of this hybrid one-seater car include an electronic throttle system and a power combining transmission. Vehicles like this traditionally couple an electric motor and gasoline engine to the wheels via a chain and sprocket system, which averages 83% efficiency, and is 92% efficient at best. MSOE’s vehicle, with the geared transmission and no chains, sees 98-99% efficiency. Students designed and built this vehicle for the SAE Formula Hybrid Competition. Location: Todd Wehr Auditorium

Ag-Rover
his autonomous ground rover represents the future of agriculture. The Ag-Rover receives commands wirelessly and traverses farmland terrain with full autonomy. It looks like your average Toro Workman MDE, until it starts driving all on its own!  It is part of a robotic system including drones and quadcopters currently being co-developed with Santa Clara University in California. The Ag-Rover will enable large-scale commercial farms to collect data and accurately monitor and micromanage their crops. Location: Todd Wehr Auditorium

Adaptive Camouflage
Military vehicles and equipment are painted with camouflage – which is great until they move into a different terrain. Adaptive Camouflage is a device that captures scenes of the environment and processes the image to determine a pattern for the vehicle that best fits the terrain type. Location: Walter Schroeder Library

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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