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Erich Mercker and Technical Subjects:
A Landscape and Industrial Artist in Twentieth-Century Germany

 

Mercker Book Cover.jpgErich Mercker is almost completely unknown in the United States and the English speaking world; even among art historians in his native Germany his name is not familiar. This industrial artist produced more than 3,000 paintings during the course of his career, yet a full-length biography on him did not exist until now. Dr. Patrick Jung, associate professor in MSOE’s General Studies Department, and former faculty member Carma Stahnke co-authored Erich Mercker and Technical Subjects: A Landscape and Industrial Artist in Twentieth-Century Germany.

This biography offers a thorough examination of Mercker’s work within the larger context of German art history during the 20th century. According to the authors, this book was written for the general reader who is interested in learning more about Mercker and the artistic and historical contexts in which he lived and worked. As such, they provide the necessary background information concerning Germany and its rich artistic heritage to allow the reader to fully understand and appreciate Mercker’s corpus of paintings.

To celebrate the release of this title, Jung has curated an exhibit at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, entitled Erich Mercker: Painter of Industry, on display now through Dec. 14. New perspectives on the artist’s life, career and art are presented in this captivating exhibition of a master of industrial painting.

Museum guests are invited to a special gallery talk event with Jung during Milwaukee’s Gallery Night on Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for the event. Erich Mercker and Technical Subjects: A Landscape and Industrial Artist in Twentieth-Century Germany will be available for purchase at the Grohmann Museum’s gift shop.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. This includes the world’s largest collection of Erich Mercker’s paintings; 82 finished paintings and more than 1,000 images of Mercker’s studies.

The Man at Work collection reflects a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,700 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Wisconsin is at the forefront of technology development in the 21st century and its high school students are a part of that trend, as proven by the winners of the 2014 Wisconsin Engineering Design Competition, sponsored by Rockwell Automation and administered by Milwaukee School of Engineering.

First Place winner Trenton Charlson, a junior at Oconomowoc (Wis.) High School, earned top honors and a $5,000 cash prize for his project, “Active Radiation Shielding for Manned Interplanetary Space Flight.”  The Second Place winners were seniors Heidi Golembiewski and Lauren Champeau from Saint Thomas More High School in Milwaukee, whose project was “Theraband Rehabilitation.”  Third Place was awarded for the “Pneumatic Nail Gun Safety” submission by seniors William Caldwell and Robert “Tommy” Lancaster of James Madison Memorial High School in Madison, Wis.

The annual competition is open to students enrolled in Project Lead The Way’s capstone course, Engineering Design & Development (EDD), which is currently offered at 37 high schools across the Badger state. This year there were 19 entries, which were evaluated by two dozen judges, each of whom reviewed five projects. The judges included STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) educators and professionals from an array of companies such as 3M, Rockwell Automation, Eaton, Kohler, Monarch, Bemis Company, Joy Global, John Deere and others.

The awards will be presented during the 2014 Annual PLTW Professional Development Conference on Nov. 17 at the Country Springs Hotel in Pewaukee, Wis., with the winners’ EDD teachers – Robert Blersch of Oconomowoc, Sharon Tomski of Milwaukee and David Lynch of Madison – invited to attend.

In addition to earning a cash award and/or a certificate of commendation and plaque for each school, the winning portfolios will be evaluated for commercial development by the Small Business Development Center at UW-Whitewater.  Funding will be provided for a comprehensive New Product Development Assessment, covering technical feasibility, review of potential competition, estimates of market demand, industry trends, etc.

“This year’s competition was supported by numerous technology and engineering-related businesses throughout Wisconsin, who recognize the value and importance of supporting STEM education and the next generation of engineers,” said Patricia Deibert, associate director of PLTW-Wisconsin.  “Individuals from those companies served not only as judges, but also as mentors for all kinds of EDD projects at schools statewide.”

The competition recognizes and rewards outstanding student projects and highlights the importance of engineering design and problem solving in STEM education. Students identify a need and address it through the design process in the capstone course, building upon the rest of the PLTW curriculum.

While developing projects, students use the online Innovation Portal to house their portfolio of work, evaluate it using a standard scoring rubric and communicate with teachers, mentors and each other.  The password-protected system allows each judge access to his or her assigned entries for evaluation and scoring.  The utility of the Innovation Portal allows this competition to be easily replicated by PLTW organizations in other states, extending the reach and impact of the concept to encompass hundreds of additional students and their projects.

“All of the entries exemplify the outstanding work being done by PLTW students across the state,” Deibert says.  “Unlike most high school courses, Engineering Design & Development is largely unstructured and wide open for students to propose and develop imaginative solutions to real world problems.  The breadth and depth of their work is nothing short of amazing.”

With the 2014-2015 school year under way, EDD students will again have the opportunity to submit their work for consideration in the spring.  “The 2014 competition was a pilot event that we’re building on for 2015,” Deibert says. “Based upon its success, we anticipate receiving even more submissions from student teams across Wisconsin at schools that are offering either PLTW capstone course – EDD for Engineering or Biomedical Innovation (BI) for Biomedical Science.

ABOUT PLTW

Project Lead The Way (PLTW) is the leading provider of rigorous and innovative STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education curricular programs used in schools. As a 501(c)(3) charitable organization, PLTW exists to prepare students for the global economy through its world-class curriculum, high quality professional development, and an engaged network of educators, students, universities and professionals. PLTW's comprehensive curriculum has been collaboratively designed by PLTW teachers, university educators, engineering and biomedical professionals, and school administrators to promote critical thinking, creativity, innovation and real-world problem solving skills in students. The hands-on, project-based program engages students on multiple levels, exposes them to areas of study that they typically do not pursue, and provides them with a foundation and proven path to college and career success. More than 4,200 schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia are currently offering PLTW courses to their students. For more information, visit www.pltw.org.

ABOUT MSOE

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2014_DBIA_Champs2_web.jpgA team of four students from Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department took first place at the 2014 National Design-Build Student Competition, sponsored by the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA). MSOE entered the competition to demonstrate design-build best practices by proposing a delivery solution to design and construct a $34 million, 120,000-square-foot activity and recreation facility for Beloit College in Beloit, Wis.

MSOE’s team presented its proposal before a national jury on Oct. 7 during the 2014 Design-Build Conference and Expo in Dallas, Texas. Other finalists making presentations included University of Oklahoma and University of Washington.

The winning team members, their majors and hometowns are:

  • Donald Bogle-Boesiger, architectural engineering and construction management, Bloomington, Ill.
  • Jordan Borst, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Wauwatosa, Wis.
  • Benjamin Ihlen, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Trevor, Wis.
  • Zane Witt, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Albuquerque, N.M.

Associate Professor Robert Lemke, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the team’s advisor.

“What set the Milwaukee School of Engineering team apart was their thorough dissection of the owner’s requirements to understand the owner’s vision in their written response to the RFP. During the presentation to the panel, they communicated with confidence and passion their ability to provide those design and construction services,” said jury chairman Dennis Ray Ashley, AIA, LEED AP, DBIA. “I’m so thankful and privileged to be able to participate in this RFQ/RFP competition that simulates the industry to assist in developing skills vital to their success in beginning their careers.”

Regional juries, comprised of industry veteran professionals, selected the 10 regional winners for the first phase of the competition based on their Request for Qualifications (RFQ) submissions, which advanced them to the second phase of the competition. In the second phase, a Request for Proposal (RFP) was released to each finalist team. Regional winners were California State University-Long Beach, Colorado State University, Iowa State University, MSOE, New School of Architecture & Design, Roger Williams University, University of Florida, University of Oklahoma, and University of Washington.

Composed of DBIA members, the following distinguished design and construction professionals are serving on the 2014 Design-Build Student Competition Jury: Dennis Ray Ashley, AIA, jury chair, preconstruction manager, Swinerton Builders, Denver; Greg Gidez, DBIA, AIA, LEED AP, director of preconstruction, Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Greeley, Colo.; Dr. James Pocock, RA, LEED AP, professor, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo.;  David Eichten, regional vice president, Charles Pankow Builders Ltd., Pasadena, Calif.; Rodney D’Spain DBIA, PE, LEED AP, regional construction manager, Burns & McDonnell, Fort Worth, Texas; Mary Anderson, senior vice president, Schnabel Engineering, Sterling, Va.; David Bloxom, DBIA, president, Speed-Fab-Crete, Fort Worth, Texas.

About DBIA

DBIA is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals. Unlike other student competitions, DBIA’s design-build competition is designed to mirror best practices in design-build procurement by breaking the competition into a two-phase best value process in which the regional and national jury serves as the owner’s project team.

About MSOE

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

20131011 Career Fair_124.jpgWhat do Google, Harley-Davidson, Brady Corp., GE Healthcare, Generac Power Systems, Johnson Controls and Rockwell Automation have in common? They employ MSOE graduates and they’re among the 211 employers coming to the MSOE Career Fair on Friday, Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Kern Center. This year’s Career Fair is the largest to date.

Employers are anxious to recruit MSOE students for internships and full-time employment, and the Career Fair is the perfect opportunity for employers and students to get to know one another. MSOE graduates are in high demand and the university’s placement rate is an impressive 96 percent.

Employers start the recruitment process early because the talent pool shrinks as we approach the second half of the academic year,” said Dr. Mary Spencer, director of career services. “They are excited to visit campus, meet MSOE students, and recruit the top talent for their open positions. They continue to grow their talent by hiring interns and offering incentives to keep them on board full time after graduation.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

military_friendly.pngMilwaukee School of Engineering has been designated a 2015 Military Friendly® School by Victory Media, a leader in connecting the military and civilian worlds. The 2015 Military Friendly Schools® list honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace military students, and to dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation.

Visit www.militaryfriendly.com for the complete list of schools on the list, interactive tools and search functionality to help military students find the best school to suit their unique needs and preferences.

Now in its sixth year, the 2015 list of Military Friendly® Schools was compiled through extensive research and a data-driven survey of more than 8,000 schools approved for Post 9/11 GI Bill funding nationwide.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2014_DBIATeam.JPG.jpgMSOE is one of only three universities to advance to the final round of the 2014 National Design-Build Student Competition, sponsored by the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA). Congratulations to team members (pictured, left to right): Zane Witt, AE/MSST; Donald Bogle-Boesiger, AE/CM; Benjamin Ihlen, AE/MSST; and Jordan Borst, AE/MSST. Associate Professor Robert Lemke is the team's advisor.

Student teams from leading design, construction and engineering universities across the country entered the competition to demonstrate design-build best practices by proposing a delivery solution to design and construct a more than 120,000-square-foot comprehensive recreation center on a college campus.

The three teams moving on to the final phase of the competition are Milwaukee School of Engineering’s “Atlas Design & Construction,” University of Oklahoma’s “Sage Building and Construction,” and University of Washington’s “TASA Design-Build Collaborative.”

Regional juries, comprised of industry veteran professionals, selected the 10 regional winners for the first phase of the competition based on their Request for Qualifications (RFQ) submissions, which advanced them to the second phase of the competition. In the second phase, a Request for Proposal (RFP) was released to each finalist team. Regional winners were California State University-Long Beach, Colorado State University, Iowa State University, MSOE, New School of Architecture & Design, Roger Williams University, University of Florida, University of Oklahoma, and University of Washington.

From this pool of regional winners, the three finalists—including MSOE—will present their proposals before a national jury on Oct. 7 during the 2014 Design-Build Conference and Expo in Dallas, Texas. The final winners will be announced and presented awards at the Conference.

Composed of DBIA members, the following distinguished design and construction professionals are serving on the 2014 Design-Build Student Competition Jury: Dennis Ray Ashley, AIA, jury chair, preconstruction manager, Swinerton Builders, Denver; Greg Gidez, DBIA, AIA, LEED AP, director of preconstruction, Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Greeley, Colo.; Dr. James Pocock, RA, LEED AP, professor, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo.;  David Eichten, regional vice president, Charles Pankow Builders Ltd., Pasadena, Calif.; Rodney D’Spain DBIA, PE, LEED AP, regional construction manager, Burns & McDonnell, Fort Worth, Texas; Mary Anderson, senior vice president, Schnabel Engineering, Sterling, Va.; David Bloxom, DBIA, president, Speed-Fab-Crete, Fort Worth, Texas.

About DBIA

DBIA is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals. Unlike other student competitions, DBIA’s design-build competition is designed to mirror best practices in design-build procurement by breaking the competition into a two-phase best value process in which the regional and national jury serves as the owner’s project team.

About MSOE

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The Grohmann Museum hosts its fifth annual Lost Arts Festival celebrating the activities and ways of work captured in the paintings and bronzes in the museum’s permanent collection. On Saturday, Sept. 27, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., artisans will share their expertise and demonstrate their techniques as the museum and its surroundings become a laboratory for the creation of “Lost Arts.” Museum docents will provide hands-on demonstrations and insight into the museum’s collection. Regular museum admission applies: $5 adults; $3 students and seniors; free for children under 12 and MSOE students, faculty, staff and alumni (with I.D.).

Steven Allen: craft brewing
With nearly a decade of experience, Steven Allen offers his expertise in home craft-brewing to the general public in a manner that is simple yet sophisticated. Rather than producing the large batch brews we are all familiar with, Allen works carefully to craft his beers to be unique, memorable and tasty. While he has produced pilsners, lagers and porters, his favorites consist mostly of Indian pale ales and stouts. Putting his experience and knowledge to work, Allen has prepared a craft brew special for this year’s festival, and will be offering sample tastings to museum patrons of age.

Helena Ehlke and the Grohmann Museum Master Painters: painting
The Grohmann Museum Master Painters use Old Masters’ techniques in order to create a sense of real depth in their art.  In contrast to modern photo-realism, the Old Masters focused on creating three-dimensionality on a flat canvas.  “Old Masters’ techniques” generally refers to a method of using indirect or layered painting techniques.  By using the indirect method of painting, oil-painting artists of the past were able to stretch the ability of oil paints to create optical illusions of a three-dimensional world.  The artists will be demonstrating these techniques by showing how artists of the past used layered painting techniques to create their works.

Kent Knapp: blacksmith
Kent Knapp began his study of blacksmithing and Milwaukee’s history at the age of 19. His passion for working with iron is matched only by his aptitude for working with it. The delicate leaves and scrolls within the immense strength of his projects are the perfect marriage for functional artistry. Capturing the classic designs or creating new ones in the old traditions, Knapp finds every challenge a new adventure. Knapp will tend to the forge and create unique pieces specifically for the Lost Arts festival.

Cheryl Myers and the MSOE Yarn Engineers: spinning, knitting, crocheting
A self-taught fiber artist, Cheryl Meyers started working with yarns and fibers almost 25 years ago. Along the way she has learned the art of knitting, crocheting and hand-spinning. She has taught knitting and crocheting to hundreds who have crossed her path, and today she still enjoys making all sorts of creations out of both handmade yarns as well as store-bought fibers. Some of her creations include wool needle-felted bears, knit wool felted hats, nuno wool felted items, crocheted baby afghans, shawls and many more handmade items. Meyers also directs a group of MSOE Yarn Engineers in their textile creations.

Jeff Selchow: woodturning
Jeff Selchow first began woodturning while in high school, but after taking a pen-making class, his skill matured and became more than just a hobby. Working carefully with lathes, saws, drills and planers, Selchow creates masterfully beautiful craft items out of a variety of woods. Ranging from table legs to  pens and ***** mashers, the smooth textures and intriguing designs almost speak for themselves. With an affinity for rosewood, Selchow will be on site operating a live lathe and turning a variety of products.

Bob “Sieg” Siegel and Luke Traver: wooden shoe carvers
Having studied with 12 master carvers in the Netherlands, Bob “Sieg” Siegel is the last master wooden-shoe carver in America. Luckily, he has enlisted two apprentices, one of whom will carve for the Lost Arts festival. Luke Traver hand carves wearable wooden shoes from log sections using three traditional tools: a side ax, block knife and spoon auger.

Mary L. Spencer: glass artist
Like many artists, Many Spencer has dabbled and experimented with a variety of media. She fell in love with glass after being introduced to it by a friend. It was love at first score and snap of the glass. Her work includes home décor or wearable glass art using the traditional (Tiffany) copper-foil method, glass fusing and mosaic. She frequently incorporates copper, brass, and/or silver in the design piece. Much of her work is influenced by African and Asian culture. The joy derived from working with glass is evident in the color, texture and beauty of the final piece.

Frogwater
The Lost Arts festival will feature live music from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. by Milwaukee’s own Frogwater, the acoustic musical pairing of John and Susan Nicholson. Renowned for their musical virtuosity and exuberant live performances, they like to think of themselves as musical ambassadors, and describe their style as “eclectic acoustic peoples’ music.” Their repertoire spans from Celtic to delta blues, classical to pop, with a healthy dose of unique, original material filling out the mix. Their innovative interpretations of traditional tunes span the centuries and the miles and defy categorization.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,700 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Outstanding full-time and part-time faculty and staff members recently were honored at MSOE.

Douglas Cook ’98, ’07, research engineer in the Rapid Prototyping Department, received the Karl O. Werwath Engineering Research Award. Karl O. Werwath was an innovator in engineering education and the application of technology, and believed that teaching effectiveness was enhanced through applied research and consulting. He felt that MSOE should make an effort to contribute to the advancement of technical knowledge for the benefit of business and industry for the good of the community and the nation. This award was initiated to recognize the vision of Karl O. Werwath and the contribution of MSOE faculty and staff who have fostered the advancement of applied scientific knowledge. Cook was nominated for this award by MSOE faculty and staff members, alumni, Regents and Corporation members. The award recipients are chosen based on criteria including their contribution to engineering, scientific research, consulting, the engineering profession and scholarship, promoting research at MSOE, patentable concepts and publications. Cook holds Bachelor of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering and a Master of Science degree in Engineering, all from Milwaukee School of Engineering.

The Falk Engineering Educator Award was presented to Dr. Michael Payne, an associate professor in the Rader School of Business, and business management program director. The award is given annually to a full-time faculty member with less than seven years experience. It is a testament to exemplary dedication and performance. Payne received a bachelor’s degree in communication from Bowling Green State University, a master’s degree in communication arts from the University of Cincinnati and his Ph.D. in communication from the University of Arizona.

Lisa Rivero, an adjunct associate professor in the General Studies Department, received the Johnson Controls Award, presented to outstanding part-time faculty. The award was inspired by Robert C. Moore, a long-time faculty member in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department. The award recognizes the contributions of part-time faculty to the education, motivation and support of the students at MSOE; encourages and recognizes excellence in teaching, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels; recognizes commitment and assistance to students outside of the classroom; and recognizes contributions to the improvement of educational programs and the effectiveness of the learning process at MSOE. Rivero earned bachelor’s degrees in English and mathematics from Marquette University and a master’s degree literary studies from UW-Milwaukee.

Five members of the faculty were named Professors Emeriti. They are: Dr. Karl David, chairman, Mathematics Department; Dr. John Gassert, professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department; Dr. Douglas Reed, professor, Rader School of Business, received the honor posthumously which his wife Cathy accepted; Dr. Mark Sebern, professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department; and Dr. Bruce Thompson, professor, Rader School of Business.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE welcomes the following full-time faculty members:

Christine Brotz ’04, instructor, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
Dr. Bradley Dennis, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Catherine Leffler, assistant professor, School of Nursing
Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey, assistant professor, General Studies Department
Dr. Michael Sracic, assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Dr. Aaron Suminski ’00, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department

MSOE also welcomes the following part-time faculty members:Tahereh Rastegarzare

Dr. Ahmed Mohamed Sayed Ahmed, adjunct association professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Dr. Rachel D. Boechler, clinical associate professor, Rader School of Business
Colleen Cullison, lecturer, General Studies Department
Thomas Eberle ’91, instructor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Kacie Marshall Frebeerg ’14, lecturer, Rader School of Business
Cindrea Gosh-Lee, lecturer, General Studies Department
Mary Grabowski, lecturer, General Studies Department
Hannah Haase, lecturer, General Studies Department
Julie Hawkins, clinical assistant professor, School of Nursing
Jon Hopkins, adjunct associate professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Dr. Lisa Jurgens, adjunct assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
Dr. Yoko Kawamura, lecturer, General Studies Department
Dr. John Kellogg, lecturer, General Studies Department
Veronica Moore, clinical assistant professor, School of Nursing
Dr. Megan Muthupandiyan, lecturer, General Studies Department
Paul Nistler, clinical assistant professor, Rader School of Business
Christine Olson, clinical assistant professor, School of Nursing
Brian Peters, lecturer, Rader School of Business
Brian Pfeifer ’10, P.E., lecturer, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
Tahereh Rastegarzare, lecturer, Mathematics Department
Dr. Usha Raut, adjunct associate professor, Mathematics Department
Jessica Schnur, lecturer, General Studies Department
Dr. Maria Shteynbuk, adjunct assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
Dr. Tatiana Soleski, adjunct associate professor, Mathematics Department
Gary Vroman ’91, MSOE Regent, adjunct professor, Rader School of Business
Ruth Widder, clinical assistant professor, School of Nursing

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering earned the 14th spot on U.S. News & World Report’s 2015 list of Best Universities in the Midwest. MSOE was ranked 14th in the Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs category among engineering schools whose highest degree is a bachelor’s or master’s. In addition, MSOE’s Mechanical Engineering Program was ranked 9th nationwide. The university also was ranked 4th Best College for Veterans in the Midwest.

About the rankings:

The 2015 rankings by U.S. News provide an examination of how nearly 1,400 accredited four-year schools compare on a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Among the many factors weighed in determining the rankings, the key measures of quality are: peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

U.S. News bases its undergraduate engineering programs rankings on the judgments of deans and senior faculty at peer institutions, who are surveyed each spring and asked to rate each program they are familiar with on a scale of 1 (marginal) to 5 (distinguished).

MSOE is ranked highly by a number of organization, and while this is gratifying, it is important to note that rankings should not be overemphasized by students or their families during the college selection process. Choosing a college is an individual decision that should be made by students and families based on the student’s individual needs. Students come to MSOE because of its focus on laboratory experience and career practice, expert faculty dedicated to student learning, its small college feeling within a vibrant downtown neighborhood, extremely high placement rates for graduates and the success of its alumni.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

mercker.jpgErich Mercker: Painter of Industry is on display at the Grohmann Museum Sept. 5 through Dec. 14. In conjunction with the October release of Erich Mercker and Technical Subjects: A Landscape and Industrial Artist in Twentieth-Century Germany, MSOE associate professor, author and guest curator Dr. Patrick Jung presents his selection of Mercker’s work from the museum’s permanent collection. New perspectives on the artist’s life, career and art are presented in this captivating exhibition of a master of industrial painting.

Museum guests are invited to a special gallery talk event with guest Jung during Gallery Night and Day. Jung’s talk will take place Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for the event.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,700 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

WWMBA_Photo_4x6.jpgIn response to a growing need to better prepare school and district leaders for today’s challenges and opportunities, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced its inaugural class of Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership in Wisconsin. The MBA Fellowship program charts a new course in education leader preparation, blending clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework to ensure graduates have the knowledge, skills, and character to both lead and close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between the country’s top-performing schools and those around the world.

Wisconsin is one of the first two states to launch the Woodrow Wilson (WW) MBA Fellowships. The Woodrow Wilson Foundation is partnering with Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) on the initiative, which provides school leaders with a blend of graduate coursework and a tailored MBA curriculum.

“As a nation, we must do a better job preparing our future school and district leaders,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “What we did in the past will no longer suffice. We need new approaches and new preparation that addresses where our schools and classrooms are headed. These Wisconsin MBA Fellows are not only committed to improving education and closing the achievement gap in Wisconsin, but they will be leaders in a new national movement to dramatically improve how we prepare educators.”

The Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership recruits and prepares experienced educators, who will take 13 months of executive-style MBA courses. The program, one of the first two in the nation, is offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and is equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will create school cultures to drive innovation in schools, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international levels, create school cultures to foster citizens of good character, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time. Wisconsin joins Indiana as the first two states to embrace this new approach to school leadership. Each Fellow was selected from a highly competitive pool of nominees.

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, candidates were nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows were selected based on key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. Each receives a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with executive coaching and opportunities for international experience in innovative schools in other countries. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified districts/schools for at least three years.

MSOE is partnering with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements (in-school learning arrangements) and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows.

“We are pleased to welcome the Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows to MSOE. Our new degree program raises the bar in education standards, and these Fellows are committed to improving student performance in Wisconsin,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “At MSOE we prepare our students to be leaders, and the Fellows are no exception. They’re highly qualified school leaders who are going to be change agents.”

Levine, MSOE President Viets, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch, honored Wisconsin’s first class of Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows at an event at MSOE on Sept. 4, 2014.

“Wisconsin has a proud history leading the nation in ground-breaking education reforms.  This new fellowship program is an exciting addition to that tradition of innovation and educational excellence.  By combining best practices from the business world and the classroom, MSOE’s MBA in Education Leadership will equip Wisconsin’s school principals and superintendents to better teach our children, lead their staffs, and steward taxpayer dollars,” Kleefisch said.

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state Teaching Fellowship, which works to transform teacher education and recruit very able candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in five states with 28 universities.

Visit http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation. To learn more about the program at MSOE visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI, average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Profiles: 2014 Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership

Kourtney Bauswell
Dean of Curriculum & Instruction, Milwaukee Collegiate Academy
B.A., political science and sociology, Purdue University
M.Ed., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Former social studies teacher, social studies content team leader, and instructional coach, Hmong American Peace Academy; Emerging Leader Fellow, Schools That Can—Milwaukee; participant, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management’s Executive Education Program; former Teach for America corps member.

Lyndee Belanger
Junior Academy Achievement Director, Milwaukee Academy of Science
B.S., elementary education, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.S., curriculum and instruction, Lesley University
Former middle school reading and language arts teacher; former lead teacher for middle school; former administrator for grades 6–12 and member of the school leadership team; as Achievement Director, curriculum and assessment leader, teacher coach, and advisor on best practices; 2010 Teacher of the Year, Wisconsin Charter Schools Association.

Lindsay Cialdini
Second-Grade Teacher and Curriculum Coordinator/Technology Chair, Slinger School District
B.S., elementary education/mathematics, Drake University
M.Ed., curriculum and instruction (integrated teaching through the arts), Lesley University
Former first-grade teacher, urban Washington, D.C.; ten-year teaching veteran; math curriculum coordinator; participant in Wisconsin Statewide Mathematics Institute, focusing on professional development for K–12 mathematics teachers in implementing the Common Core State Standards; Presidential Scholarship recipient;.

Dan Gebauer
Teaching and Learning Specialist/Technology Coach, Elmbrook Schools
B.S., criminal justice, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.Ed., Cardinal Stritch University
National Board Certified middle childhood generalist; coach for 300+ educators in the use of various teaching/learning technologies and web-based assessment and learning systems; ten-year teaching veteran; district leader/committee member, mathematics education, assessment, professional development, and teacher coaching; invited presenter, Wisconsin Education Innovations and other conferences; former police officer.

Erik Herbrechtsmeier
Math Teacher, Middle and High School, Kenosha Unified School District
B.A., mathematics/ secondary education, Carthage College
M.S., mathematics education, Walden University
Teacher at Kenosha Unified since 2001; teacher mentor, lead technology developer, former mathematics department chair (Indian Trail High School and Academy); adjunct instructor, Gateway Technical College (Kenosha).

Lalenunat M. Johnson
Assistant Principal/Director of Teaching Leadership, North Point Lighthouse Charter School
B.A., management and communications, Concordia University, WI
M.S., education policy and leadership, Marquette University, WI
Former 5th and 6th grade teacher at Milwaukee Collegiate Preparatory Academy; also taught 5th through 8th grade history. Started in education as a volunteer and educational assistant and worked her way through college to become a teacher; former Teach for America corps member.

Rodney Lynk Jr.
Assistant Principal, Rocketship Southside Community Prep
B.S., finance and risk management insurance, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.S., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Leader/coach for early childhood department, K4 and K5, and math at Rocketship Southside; 2012 “Rocketeer of the Year” in his charter organization for outstanding student achievement; recipient, Sontag Urban Education Prize; leader in bringing Rocketship to Milwaukee; founding Milwaukee corps member, Teach for America.

Kris MacDonald
Dean of Students and School Culture, Carmen Middle/High School of Science and Technology, Northwest Campus
B.S., psychology/global cultures, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Educator in Wisconsin, California, and abroad; former Teach for America corps member in Southern California; former bilingual educator in Costa Rica; former Corps member Advisor and School Director for TFA Summer Institutes; student life facilitator with focus on character development.

Amanda Mehr
Director of Curriculum & Instruction, Carmen Middle/High School of Science and Technology, Northwest Campus
B.A., writing intensive English/political science, Marquette University
M.S., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Former Teach for American corps member at Carmen; creator of school’s first Advanced Placement English curriculum and 9th-grade grammar/composition course; former TFA Secondary Language Arts Content Team Leader; former Assistant Director of Pre-Service Training, Milwaukee Teaching Fellows; member, Schools That Can—Milwaukee.

Megan C. Miller
Special Education Teacher and founding staff member, Milwaukee College Prep
B.A., biomedical science, Marquette University
M.Ed., Cardinal Stritch University
Leader in creating the special education program at Milwaukee College Prep; Emerging Leader Fellow, Schools That Can—Milwaukee; curriculum and assessment designer for transition to the Common Core State Standards, helping to lead professional development  in implementing the new curriculum; former Teach for America corps member.

Al Moroder
Business Education Teacher, New Berlin West Middle & High Schools
B.S., business management and marketing, Concordia University—Wisconsin
Creator of new high school personal finance curriculum; data-driven instructor who brings that approach to his students; head football coach, taking team to playoffs for the first time in nearly 15 years; pitching/catching coach for state champion baseball team; committed student life volunteer.

Megan Rindal
High School Special Education/Transition Coordinator, Elmbrook School District
B.A., University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire
M.S., vocational rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Former job coach for individuals with disabilities; special education teacher, leader and consultant with 11 years of k-12 experience; creator of innovative transitioning program for district; teacher and department coach for effective practices in special education;  led efforts to partner with local universities to provide needed resources and support to district teachers and staff.

Nasif K. Rogers
AVID District Director and Instructional Coach, Nicolet Unified High School District
B.A., history/social studies/educational studies, Ripon College
M.Ed., teaching, learning, and leadership, Cardinal Stritch University
Former social studies teacher; former debate/forensics coach; participant on pilot team for the state’s new Educator Effectiveness system; director of AVID program to close achievement gaps and ensure college readiness; crisis stabilizer/youth mentor for one of Milwaukee County’s wraparound service providers; senior director of the Empowerment Network, a local social entrepreneurship initiative.

Michele Vraney
Elementary Literacy Specialist, Mequon-Thiensville School District
B.A., Concordia University, WI
M.S., language and literacy, Cardinal Stritch University
Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade teacher, including team leader of the fifth grade; leader of district’s first-ever team recipient of teaching excellence award; recipient of district’s Outstanding Educator and Writing Teacher of the Year awards; recipient of Range Line Excellence in Teaching Award; recipient of a Herb Kohl Fellowship Award; adjunct professor, Concordia University’s graduate teacher certification program; 24-year veteran in education.

Jack Wallace
Manager, Teacher Leadership Development, Teach for America (Milwaukee)
B.A., history, Yale University
Teacher coach for first- and second-year Teach for America teachers across Milwaukee, including both the Milwaukee Public Schools and Milwaukee’s charter and choice districts; former eighth-grade reading and language arts teacher; former eighth-grade team leader; former football coach; former Teach for America corps member.

radio_education_original.jpgA History of Radio at MSOE” is now available to the public through MSOE’s Walter Schroeder Library’s digital collections. Resources in the collection document the fascinating evolution of radio and how it affected the university, its students, and radio in the greater Milwaukee area. From photos and school publications to articles and promotional materials, there are more than 1,000 pieces in the digital collection available for online browsing.

MSOE was established in 1903 by Oscar Werwath, and in his classes he taught students how to make crystal radio sets. By the mid-1920s, students were so interested in radio they formed a radio club and the educational radio classes became a separate branch of study.

As radio technology advanced, so did the curriculum and students’ involvement. They had an amateur (ham) radio station, 9SO, and broadcast station WIAO (later WSOE) which was used for broadcasting music, lectures and school activities. In 1928, WSOE was purchased by the Wisconsin News Network and became WISN. In the 1930s the Radio Club made contact with an Antarctic exhibition and Russia.

By the 1940s, televisions became affordable for the masses and student interest shifted. MSOE’s radio education curriculum was expanded to include television repair classes. The radio club regained momentum in 1949 and changed its call sign to W9HHX.

The 1950s and 60s saw many partnerships between MSOE and WISN radio and WISN-TV to produce several shows, most notably “Education on Parade,” “Challenge” and “Sounds of Science.” In 1967, the student clubs began discussion about setting up an official campus radio station. And in 1968, what had begun strictly as radio curriculum became the Electronic Communications Engineering technology degree program at MSOE.

MSOE’s official radio station, WMSE-FM began broadcasting alternative and free-form music programming in 1981 thanks to a generous donation from alumnus Everett Cobb. More than 30 years of WMSE history are also included in the digital collection.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Greenheck1.jpgMSOE students, alumni, faculty and staff will have a fun, one-day opportunity to learn about the HVAC industry on Tuesday, Sept. 9 when the Greenheck AirTour Learning Center arrives on campus.

Greenheck Fan Corporation’s multimedia mobile learning center, housed in a semi-trailer, travels across the country and offers engineers an opportunity to learn more about the non-residential heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry. The MSOE community is invited to see live demonstrations of some of Greenheck’s product offerings, and interact with recruiters and engineers from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The mobile learning center will be in MSOE’s State Street C Lot, at the corner of Milwaukee and State Streets.

Demonstrations include:

  • Air to air energy recovery
  • Damper energy efficiency
  • Fan energy savings; reducing duct system effects
  • Energy saving ECM’s (Electronically Commutated Motors)
  • Saving energy with flow and pressure controls
  • Energy saving flow measurement

 

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is one of the best colleges and universities in the Midwest according to The Princeton Review. Only 158 institutions were named to the “Best in the Midwest” list on The Princeton Review’s website feature, “2015 Best Colleges: Region by Region.”

To compile their lists, The Princeton Review asks students attending the schools to rate their own schools on several issues -- from the accessibility of their professors to quality of their science lab facilities -- and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students, and their campus life.  Comments from surveyed students are quoted in the school profiles on The Princeton Review site.

The 158 colleges chosen for the “Best in the Midwest” list are located in twelve states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The Princeton Review also designated 225 colleges in the Northeast, 123 in the West, and 138 in the Southeast as best in their locales on the company’s “2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region” lists. Collectively, the 644 colleges named “regional best(s)” constitute about 25% of the nation’s 2,500 four-year colleges.

In addition to being named one of the “Best in the Midwest,” MSOE was one of only 24 colleges nationwide included in The Princeton Review’s “2015 Fire Safety Rating Honor Roll.” The honor roll honors colleges and universities concerning their on-campus housing fire safety practices and policies, and measures how prepared they are to prevent or respond to campus fires. MSOE was the only university in Wisconsin to be named to the Fire Safety Honor Roll.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.