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2015_FBLA_Nationals.jpgFour students from MSOE placed among the best in the nation during competitions held at the Future Business Leaders of America/Phi Beta Lambda National Leadership Conference (FBLA/PBL). John Von Helms, double major in mechanical engineering and business management, captured MSOE’s highest award with a third place finish in international business. Students who finished among the top 10 in their respective competitions received awards and recognition at the conference.

In addition to the third place finish by Von Helms, Ian Hyzy, management information systems major, earned fourth place in computing concepts; with Michael LeRoy, management information systems major, finishing in sixth. Rounding out MSOE’s awards was Forrest Fink, international business major, receiving sixth place in management concepts.

The FBLA-PBL competitions were held in Chicago June 24-27, 2015, and attracted nearly 1,800 college students from across the country. MSOE’s team of four students were part of an 18-student contingent representing several other universities in the state. The four MSOE awards matched UW-Oshkosh for the most earned by any Wisconsin university.

Patricia Hurlbut, MSOE’s director of instructional technology, accompanied the team on their trip to Chicago. Dr. Katrina Moskalik serves as the group’s faculty advisor during the year. The Rader School of Business and its student chapter of FBLA/PBL have been affiliated with the organization since 2006. Membership is open to students of all majors.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2015_HOF.jpgMilwaukee School of Engineering has announced nine former student-athletes will make up the 2015 induction class into the MSOE Athletic Hall of Fame.

Spencer Cook '08, Vickie (Georgakas) Cook '08, Matt Hopf '04, Dominic Maio '09, Allie (Sowinski) Malzahn '09, Scott Maupin '07, Jeremy Off '10, Joel Vande Boom '10 and Jason Woll '09 will be inducted during a ceremony and banquet Oct. 17, 2015 at the Kern Center.

MSOE recognizes the best of the best in the Athletic Hall of Fame. Our alumni who, as student-athletes, gave their all to their sport and were leaders during their college careers. These players exuded leadership and sportsmanship, not only recognized by MSOE, but many were recognized regionally and nationally.

MSOE's Athletic Hall of Fame also recognizes outstanding coaches and other supporters of MSOE's athletic program.

For more information about these athletes and to register for the event, visit Go-Raiders.com.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

President Hermann Viets announced on June 24 that Milwaukee School of Engineering purchased a 1.78 acre parcel of land thanks to the support of very generous MSOE donors including Regent Dawn Tabat, Regent Bob Kern and Pat Kern, and Regent John Mellowes and Linda Mellowes, and other committed donors.

The land, located at 1214 N. Water St., currently is operating as a parking lot. It is directly across from the Grohmann Tower, and is bordered by Water St., Juneau Ave., Knapp St., and Market St. There are no immediate plans for the property, which will continue to function as a public parking lot.

“This property is important for the continued success of MSOE,” said Viets. “I am pleased to share this good news with the MSOE community.” Viets made the announcement during the Grohmann Tower Dedication Ceremony and farewell reception honoring his retirement.

IMG_4625.jpgMilwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Engineers Without Borders USA (EWB-USA) is an organization that incites change throughout the world by providing solutions to fulfill communities’ basic human needs. Members of MSOE’s chapter of EWB (EWB-MSOE) constructed a cable-supported footbridge over a riverbed in Guatemala, effectively linking two communities together.1.jpg

Bridges are often taken for granted in the United States. They allow convenient and reliable passage and make for easier commerce and communication. However, every year during the rainy season, members of the village of Salitre, Guatemala, were barred from traveling over the Rio Arco into the nearby town of Joyabaj. This meant they could not visit the town’s clinics, send their children to the school, or take their crops to the regional market. Until the season ended and the river dried, the locals were unable to properly support themselves. EWB-MSOE stepped in to help.

The initiative to provide Salitre with a bridge involved eight months of work, beginning during the 2014 Thanksgiving break. Three students along with Professor Douglas Stahl, Ph.D. and professional engineering mentors traveled to Guatemala to test the soil and survey the land on which the bridge would be built.

When the team returned to Milwaukee, they and other members of EWB-MSOE used this assessment and worked for months to plan for the construction that would take place in June 2015. The bridge was to span 235 feet over the Rio Arco and have a walkway that was 40 inches wide. Five 1 ¼ inch cables were to support the bridge along with several towers made up of 400,000 pounds of stone masonry and concrete.

EWB-MSOE returned to Guatemala in June to put their plans into action. This construction team was made up of 10 students including project manager Marley Trier, lead designers for the bridge’s towers and foundation Riley Padron and Megan Feilbach, lead designers for the cables Larissa Bogle-Boesiger and Logan Bertling, and lead designer for the deck Jacob Haen. Dr. Stahl, MSOE lab technician Justin Tracey, and certified PE John Siwula also traveled with the students to help build.

Though the EWB-MSOE team was made up of hardworking members, the work could not have been completed without help from others outside the group. Community volunteers from Salitre provided over 19,000 man-hours of labor. Funding for the project was provided by the Rotary Club of Milwaukee as well as other rotary clubs in Wisconsin and Guatemala. Additionally, financial support for the group’s travel was provided by the MSOE Office of Servant-Leadership.

Thanks to those involved with this project, the villagers of Salitre now have an improved quality of life with safe, reliable and year-round access to the school, clinics and markets of Joyabaj. Members of EWB-MSOE will return to Salitre in the future to observe how the bridge is holding up as well as how it has affected the village.

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2015_GE_Girls.jpgThirty middle school girls will be discovering just how fun and interesting it can be to utilize science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through hands-on projects and mentoring with women currently in STEM careers.

The GE Girls at MSOE program inspires middle school girls to consider STEM careers through engaging and challenging hands-on experiences using STEM skills in collaboration with women role models currently working in related industries. 

The program is a week-long experience (June 22-26, 2015) that features dynamic curriculum around physics, math, chemistry, and electronics, in addition to projects developed specifically around the expertise at GE Healthcare, GE Power & Water and MSOE.

Girls participate in numerous hands-on interactive learning exercises and skill development intended to spark their interest in building engines, understanding combustion, electronic circuitry, medical imaging, Lean principles and even the chemistry know-how needed to create lip gloss and ice cream.

They’ll spend Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the classrooms and laboratories at MSOE; Tuesday at GE Power & Water; and Thursday at GE Healthcare.

GE Girls began in 2011, following a challenge from GE CEO Jeff Immelt to have a greater impact on women in STEM. The GE Aviation team partnered with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to develop a curriculum designed to spark girls’ interest in STEM.  In 2012, GE Girls was launched by GE Healthcare in Milwaukee at MSOE. During the summer of 2015, GE Girls programs will be held in 12 GE communities across the US.

GE Girls partners in southeastern Wisconsin include GE Healthcare, GE Power & Water, GE Women’s Network, MSOE and the Waukesha School System. The leaders/instructors of the program are employees of these organizations.

Studies show that middle school is a time when many girls lose interest in science and math. GE Girls wants to bring out the inner engineer or rocket scientist that may be inside these students at a time when young minds are open to anything. Middle schoolers from Les Paul Middle School and Waukesha STEM academy were selected to participate in 2105. Since it began in Milwaukee in 2012, a total of 104 girls from the Waukesha area will have participated.

Each program participant meets with an accomplished female mentor from the GE Women’s Network. Mentoring continues after the week-long program ends.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

H2O_Lab_CC50261.jpgMSOE's 2015 Spring Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

Download the Dean's List | Download the Honors List

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

College_Recruiter.jpgMilwaukee School of Engineering was included in a new ranking that helps employers find the best college graduates. College Recruiter, a niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, announced the 12 winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates who majored in electrical and communications engineering.

College Recruiter compared 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific institution.

The modeling for this hidden gem school project was to identify the schools which featured high SAT/ACT scores for entering students, high average starting salaries for the regions in which the schools were located, a high percentage of graduates working in their chosen field of study, and a majority of the graduating class available for recruitment by employers.

The top 12 hidden gem schools are:

  1. University of Dayton
  2. Western Washington University
  3. Milwaukee School of Engineering
  4. Oklahoma State University-Main Campus
  5. University of Maine
  6. University of Cincinnati-Main Campus
  7. California State University-Long Beach
  8. University of Houston
  9. Louisiana Tech University
  10. Georgia Southern University
  11. Buffalo State SUNY
  12. Farmingdale State College

 

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Science Olympiad 2015 2.jpgA team from Harriton High School in Rosemont, Penn., took first place in the National Science Olympiad Protein Modeling Event at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln May 15 and 16. The victory earns each of the team’s three students a $10,000 scholarship every year for four years to attend Milwaukee School of Engineering, if they choose to apply to the university and are accepted.

Tim Herman, Ph.D., director of the MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM), presented the scholarships to Sarah Root, Dayita Sharma and Jamie Song during the awards ceremony. The CBM founded the Science Olympiad Protein Modeling Event and continues to be a national sponsor.

“Each year the students raise the bar a little higher in terms of the quality of the models they create,” said Herman. “That was certainly the case this year.”

Science Olympiad features nearly two dozen team events. In the Protein Modeling Event, students must prove they understand basic features of protein structure, use online visualization tools to explore and manipulate protein structures, and create 3-D physical models of proteins using foam-covered wire.

The 2015 national Protein Modeling Event challenge was to model a fragment of the CRISPR Cas9 protein that is being used to edit the human genome. Cas9 is a bacterial DNA nuclease enzyme that naturally functions in bacteria to protect them from invading viruses. Many researchers have recently modified the CRISPR/Cas9 system to be useful in gene-editing.

Science Olympiad 2015 4.jpgSixty high school teams competed in the national challenge. More than 4,200 teams took part in invitational, regional and state protein modeling event competitions, also focused on gene-editing proteins.

The challenge for the 2015-16 school year will involve the sepiapterin reductase enzyme, which is needed to make neurotransmitters. A mutation in the gene that encodes this protein was identified by whole genome sequencing in 2010, leading to a molecular diagnosis and successful treatment of California twins with gene variants causing them to have life-threatening low levels of three neurotransmitters.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI, average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Wisconsin, Woodrow Wilson Foundation continue groundbreaking effort to prepare next generation of school leaders for state as Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership begin classes this summer at MSOE

2015_MBA_Ed_Leadership.jpg

Wisconsin’s second class of Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership were announced today at the State Capitol, as the state continues to set new national standards in the preparation and placement of educational leaders equipped to head changing 21st century schools.

Launched last year, the Woodrow Wilson (WW) Wisconsin MBA Fellowship program charts a new course in education leader preparation, blending clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework to ensure graduates have the knowledge, skills, and character not only to guide schools and districts in a changing education environment, but also to close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between the country’s top-performing schools and those around the world.

Wisconsin was one of the first two states to launch the WW MBA Fellowships. The Woodrow Wilson Foundation is partnering with Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) on the initiative, which provides school leaders with a blend of graduate coursework and a tailored MBA curriculum.

“Through the Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship, Wisconsin is drawing on the most innovative thinking in leader preparation today,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “Because of the efforts at MSOE and the hard work and commitment of educators across the state, Wisconsin is readying strong school leaders with the knowledge, experience, support, and character needed to ensure the very best for our kids. The success here in Wisconsin is part of a new national movement to dramatically improve how we prepare educators, recognizing that the failed ways of the past will no longer be accepted.”

This year’s class of WW MBA Fellows at MSOE include:

  • Gina Baxter, classroom teacher, intervention specialist/coordinator, international baccalaureate primary years curriculum coordinator, Green Lake School
  • Kyle Charters, special education teacher, Milwaukee Collegiate Academy
  • Ashley Imperiale, seventh grade math teacher, Whitman Middle School
  • John Meuler, director of graduate support, Nativity Jesuit Academy
  • Tim Mueller, principal, Star of Bethlehem School
  • Jonathon Nowak, director of operations, HOPE Christian School
  • Travis Olson, English teacher and English Department chair, Kiel High School
  • Chelsea Prochnow, dean of instruction, HOPE Christian School
  • Shane Radosevich, teaching and learning specialist, Wisconsin Hills Middle School
  • Misa Sato, anatomy and physiology and chemistry teacher, Reagan High School
  • Yedda Sheller, social studies teacher, Brillion High School
  • Chad Sova, fifth grade teacher, Donges Bay Elementary School
  • Mary Stelter, special education teacher, Parkview High School
  • Rachel Streff, sixth grade science teacher and team lead, Carmen School of Science and Technology


The Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership recruits and prepares experienced educators who will take a full year of executive-style MBA courses. The program is offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and is equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will create school cultures to drive innovation, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international levels, foster citizens of good character, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time. Wisconsin and Indiana were the first two states to embrace this new approach to school leadership, with New Mexico joining this year. Each Fellow was selected from a highly competitive pool of nominees.

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, the WW MBA Fellowship requires that candidates be current educators who are nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows were selected based on key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. Each receives a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with executive coaching. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified districts/schools for at least three years.

MSOE is partnering with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements (in-school learning arrangements) and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows.

“Since its founding in 1903, MSOE has maintained strong relationships with business and industry, giving our students real-world experience in the fields before they graduate. The same is true for the WW MBA Fellows,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “At MSOE, we continually raise the bar in education standards and prepare our students to be leaders.”

The Woodrow Wilson Foundation, MSOE, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch, honored the 2015–16 class of Wisconsin Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows at an event at the State Capitol this morning.

"The education leaders participating in this program are proving once again that Wisconsin continues to lead the nation in education reform,” Lieutenant Gov. Kleefisch said. “These Fellows will draw on best practices from the business world and the classroom to serve their school districts' children and taxpayers with innovation and excellence."

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state-based Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship, which works to transform teacher education and recruit excellent candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in five states in partnership with 28 universities.

Visit http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba/wisconsin/ to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation in Wisconsin. To learn more about the program at MSOE visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI, average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

More than 350 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Spring Commencement, Saturday, May 23, 2015 at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature keynote addresses from MSOE Regent James Rahn, president of the Kern Family Foundation, and MSOE Regent Dawn Tabat, executive vice president of community and external relations, Generac Power Systems. Each also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Business and Economics degree.

Samantha Scharles is the class respondent, the honor that goes to the graduate with the highest GPA. Scharles is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering.

Andrew Kosasih and Brett Nockerts will receive the Alumni Association Award. Recipients of this prestigious award are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving. Both are graduating with high honors. Kosasih will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering and Nockerts will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Software Engineering.

About James Rahn:

Rahn.jpgMSOE Regent James C. Rahn has served as president of the Kern Family Foundation in Waukesha, Wis., since 2008. In this role, he provides direction for expanding existing programs and establishing new programs in support of the foundation’s mission to build the future through values, education and innovation. He joined the foundation in September 2007 as the education reform program director. Before that, he spent six years as director of the Center for Urban Teaching and assistant professor of education at Wisconsin Lutheran College. Prior to his work in higher education, he served in K-12 Lutheran schools as teacher, principal and regional school coordinator. Rahn became an MSOE Regent in 2013, and is also a member of the Project Lead The Way board of directors. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Dr. Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minn., and a master’s degree from Concordia University in River Forest, Ill.

About Dawn Tabat:

Tabat.jpgMSOE Regent Dawn Tabat served as COO for Generac Power Systems from 2002 until 2013, and had oversight of manufacturing, logistics, global supply chain, quality, safety and information services. She currently serves as executive vice president of community and external relations for Generac Power Systems. Tabat joined Generac in 1972 and served as personnel manager and personnel director before being promoted to vice president of human resources in 1992, and chief operating officer in 2002. She was part of the team that witnessed Generac’s growth in the 1980s from 200 to 2,100 employees, and its continued growth since then. With Generac, she has traveled the world and visited every continent. Tabat has served as an MSOE Regent since 2012. She was named a Woman of Influence by the Milwaukee Business Journal in 2011. Tabat is the founding director and board chairperson of GPS Education Partners and she also serves on the Kern Family Foundation Board of Directors.

 

Commencement.jpgMilwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

NM Master Class_15.jpgMSOE students participated in a six-part Master Class series with the design architect and development manager for the Northwestern Mutual Tower and Commons. The class engaged more than 80 local architecture, interior design, engineering and real estate students from six area colleges in various elements of the company’s downtown Milwaukee expansion. The project and construction site became a real-world, working “laboratory”.

The topics covered in the class included real estate, technology and sustainability which were then organized around programming, schematic design, design development, and construction and documentation. The group of students who participated in the program consisted of different majors from MSOE, Marquette University, Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, Mount Mary University, UW-Milwaukee and UW-Madison.

On May 4 the MSOE students who participated in the Master Class received their diplomas. Robert Lemke, MSOE associate professor, was the faculty advisor for Holly Denfeld, Derek Hummel, Chad Kraus, Kailey Lietzke, Greg Lisowski, Marina Sharp, Travis Smith, Gretchen Toshach, Marlena Trier and Jill Vande Boom. The class was offered December 2013 to May 2015.

Many of the students said they had the opportunity to gain real world experience that cannot be met in the normal classroom experience as well as discover the endless career opportunities that are possible in the construction industry. They also had the chance to interact with students of different majors which gave them perspectives outside of their own majors.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Senior Design 2014_181.jpgFriday, May 22 is Senior Project Day at MSOE and more than 80 projects will be on display at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Throughout their senior year, MSOE students collaborate with classmates on a final project related to their degree program. It’s an opportunity for them to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. The projects are often sponsored by companies looking to solve a problem, and others are driven by a student’s interests.

School of Nursing – 10 a.m. to Noon – Campus Center, Ruehlow Nursing Complex
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department – 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Walter Schroeder Library and Werwath Mall
Physics and Chemistry Department – 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Campus Center, second floor
Mechanical Engineering Department – Noon to 3 p.m. – Todd Wehr Auditorium

A complete list of projects can be downloaded here.

TruckMuncher
Food trucks are all the rage right now, and it’s never been easier to find one nearby thanks to TruckMuncher, an app designed by software engineering majors. TruckMuncher locates the nearest trucks and also lets users find their favorite trucks and view their menus. Location: Werwath Mall

Car Seat Alert System
Prevent childhood heatstroke and possibly death by using this car seat alert system designed by electrical engineering technology majors. Using three sensors, if there is a child in the vehicle, a buzzer will alert the driver when the ignition is turned off so that the child is not left behind. Next, a signal is sent to make the key fob vibrate, and if within 30 seconds, the sensors still detect a child in the seat, the vehicle’s horn will sound. Location: Library

Electric Wind Chime
Let the wind determine your music choices. Electrical engineering students developed a magnetic mechanism that simulates the operation of a wind chime. A microprocessor senses wind speed and plays a song to the rhythm of the wind. Users load songs into the device and can relax while their favorite songs play with the pleasant sounds of a wind chime. Location: Library

Striped Hat Brigade
A team of computer engineering and software engineering students teamed up to design a virtual presence device. An iPad mounted on a robot chassis allows someone with an iPad or iPhone to communicate via a video feed with people in different location—something that could be useful in a hostage or disaster situation. Location: Library

SAE Formula Hybrid Vehicle
See the car that took fourth place in the world and first in the United States! MSOE’s team of electrical and mechanical engineering majors designed, built and competed their high-performance hybrid vehicle at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway. Location: Campus Center, outdoors

Legionnaires Detection Kit
In 2010, Legionnaires disease affected the Milwaukee area and was traced back to a decorative water fountain in a local hospital. While tests exist to detect Legionella, they are costly, time-consuming and sometimes unable to differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic forms of the bacteria. Biomolecular engineering majors developed an inexpensive, multi-phase kit capable of rapidly detecting the bacteria while adhering to industry regulations and standards. Location: Campus Center, second floor

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Congratulations to the more than 60 Milwaukee School of Engineering students who were nominated for leadership awards this year. The following awards were presented at the annual President’s Student Leadership Awards Dinner on May 6:

Outstanding Student Award

Nina Alioto, of Greenfield, Wis., was chosen as the 2015 recipient of the Fred F. Loock Outstanding Student Award. This award is presented annually to the MSOE senior student, who, in the opinion of the faculty, most notably combines an excellent academic record and has at the same time demonstrated leadership and professional bearing in extracurricular or community service activities. It is the most prestigious student testimonial that MSOE bestows. Alioto will graduate May 24 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from MSOE.

Other Awards

Vincent R. Canino Outstanding Biomedical Engineering Senior Student Award – Amy Gustafson, Eagan, Minn., biomedical engineering

Nursing Leadership Award – Carly Ademi, Cudahy, Wis., nursing

Matt W. Fuchs Outstanding CAECM Senior Student Award – Sitlalic Aguilar, Milwaukee, construction management

Thomas W. Davis Student Leadership Award – Jonathan Braaten, Glasgow, Mont., mechanical engineering

Daniel E. Sahs Award for Service – Elizabeth Donohew, Milwaukee, software engineering

Outstanding Peer Assistant Award – Sean McGarry, Hoffman Estates, Ill., biomedical engineering

Resident Assistant Programming Award – Connor Bord, Beach Park, Ill., biomedical engineering

Greek of the Year Award – Jeffrey Sparks, Bloomington, Ind., software engineering

Student Employee of the Year Award – Nicole Baylon, Wadsworth, Ill., business management

Senior Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Garrett Farin, Madison, Wis., soccer, mechanical engineering; Jerome Rhodes, Chicago, track and field, business management

Senior Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Marlena Trier, Port Washington, Wis., tennis and basketball, civil engineering

Scholar Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Nathan Verdun, New Berlin, Wis., basketball, architectural engineering and structural engineering

Scholar Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Marlena Trier, Port Washington, Wis., tennis and basketball, civil engineering

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2015_SAE_Formula_Hybrid1.jpgMSOE’s Formula Hybrid team took fourth place in the world at the Formula Hybrid Competition and first place in the United States. The competition was held in May at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Louden, N.H. Founded and run by Dartmouth, the competition challenges college and university students to design, build and compete high-performance hybrid and electric vehicles. Building on the Formula SAE program, Formula Hybrid adds an extra level of complexity: fuel efficiency.

The Formula Hybrid competition consists of a variety of dynamic and static events. Throughout the events, students assume the role of a design team engaged to create a prototype vehicle. Teams demonstrate their creativity and project management skills, as well as their vehicle’s performance and durability. The challenge is to create a vehicle that is road-worthy and prevail over other designs. Events are scored to determine how well a vehicle will perform.

2015_SAE_Formula_Hybrid2.jpgIn February it was announced that MSOE’s student chapter of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) was the Class 1 recipient of the 2014 SAE Honeywell Outstanding Collegiate Branch Award. This award, which was established in 1963 by the Bendix Corp., recognizes SAE Collegiate Branches for exemplary performance in the areas of technical meetings, networking opportunities, promoting SAE membership, activities including the Collegiate Design SeriesTM competitions, and community service programs like A World in Motion®. With 132 student members, MSOE’s SAE student chapter is the second largest student chapter in the U.S. and third largest in the world. The Formula Hybrid vehicle is one of several design projects MSOE’s SAE members work on each year.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2015_Steel_Bridge2.jpgMSOE’s student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers participated in the Great Lakes Regional Competition at the University of Notre Dame in April. Students competed in the Steel Bridge Competition and the Concrete Canoe Competition. The steel bridge MSOE entered in the competition was one of 16 bridges, while the Concrete Canoe team competed against 17 other schools.

MSOE’s Steel Bridge team consisted of 15 team members while four of those members were the builders for the competition. The team members were Michael Anaszewicz, Logan Bertling, David Burt, Sean Casey, Ryan Christensen, Benjamin Dodd, Dawid Gwozdz, Jacob Haen, Edward Hinsa, Constantine Moshi and Riley Padron. The team worked on the design of the bridge from the middle of August until late November. The months of December and January were spent testing the connections of the bridge to make sure they could withstand the load bearing requirements. They spent February fabricating their bridge, and in March, the team practiced building the bridge up until the competition in April.

2015_Steel_Bridge1.jpgThe bridge was judged on its lightness, deflection, structural efficiency and the speed at which the bridge was built. It was also required to hold 2,500 pounds. The final product was 18.5 feet long, 2.5 feet tall, and 3 feet wide. It weighed in at 126 pounds. The bridge was built in the third fastest time which was 13 minutes. They took second place and will travel to the national competition in May at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Update: On May 23, 2015, the team competed at the national competition and took second place for their display.

The Concrete Canoe Team involved many students who regularly participated in the construction of the concrete canoe and eight students attended the regional competition: Abigail Allen, Karissa Brunette, Holly Denfeld, Chris Garcia, Brian Janus, Miya Preston, Daniel Vonberg and Johanna Wang. Also on the team were Reney Bagnall, Finn Finucane, Luke Muller and Zach Regnier.

2015_Concrete_Canoe.jpgThe competition was comprised of four main categories: Design Paper, Final Product, Oral Presentation and Racing. The design paper consisted of the methods of construction, materials used in construction, hull design, concrete mix design, project management strategies and more technical aspects. The aesthetics and display of the canoe was included in the final product category. Samples of the concrete, a sectional view of the canoe, and highlights of the design paper were displayed as well. The oral presentation was about the design paper which was then followed by a Q&A from the judges.

The most exciting part for the teams is the racing of the canoes. The races are a men’s and women’s sprint, men’s and women’s endurance, and a co-ed sprint. The team is proud to say the canoe survived all five races. They finished 14th place and have bright plans for the 2016 competition. All of the team members are returning next school year and hope to make improvements.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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