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Fyfe_Billy_web.jpgBilly Fyfe has been appointed director of the Public Safety Department at Milwaukee School of Engineering. Fyfe has more than 12 years of experience in university safety and security. He previously served as a shuttle driver, patrol officer, sergeant and lieutenant with MSOE’s Public Safety Department. He earned an associate degree in criminal justice from Milwaukee Area Technical College and is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Business Management at MSOE. He also worked for the public safety department at Marquette University. Fyfe enjoys spending time with his family in Jackson, Wis.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE finished 4th among 10 teams at the Midwest Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (CCDC). The competition features the state CCDC champions from Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky in a two-day, continuous cybersecurity competition. This is the third year in a row that MSOE took first place in Wisconsin to qualify for the Midwest competition.

Top tech-savvy students from across the country form teams to compete first at the state level, then the regional level. Regional winners go on to a national competition. For the competitions, teams build and defend a mock production business infrastructure from professional “hackers” who are given the challenge to take each team’s production systems offline and breach their security. While the teams work hard to fend off “hackers,” the competition judging staff deploys network enhancement and upgrade challenges to teams, judging team’s performance, scoring and supporting the overall event.

2015_CCDC_DataCenter_web.jpgMilwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Viets1.jpgAll are invited to hear Dr. Hermann Viets, president of MSOE, deliver his “Last Lecture” on Thursday, April 30 at 5:30 p.m. in the Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway. He will give the sixth annual lecture in MSOE’s Last Lecture series, in which one member of the MSOE staff or faculty is invited to pass on their greatest and most succinct knowledge and life-experiences to the MSOE community. Viets, who will retire June 30, will reflect on his time at the university and also share his life experiences and accomplishments.

The purpose of the series is twofold: to recognize a faculty or staff member for his or her years of service and contributions to the university, and for those in attendance to learn what the speaker truly believes are the most important facets of their human life experiences and accomplishments. Students, faculty and staff have the opportunity to nominate speakers from a list of eligible individuals, and the speaker is chosen by the Student Life Office.

Viets is only the fourth president in MSOE’s 112-year history. During his 24 years at MSOE, the university has implemented several undergraduate international study-abroad programs, a baccalaureate two-degree program, a number of Bachelor of Science degrees and Master of Science degrees. The campus grew to 20 acres with the addition of several buildings including Krueger Hall, Rosenberg Hall, Humphrey House, Kern Center, Grohmann Museum, Viets Field and Grohmann Tower.

Viets received a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering, and both a Master of Science and Ph.D. in Astronautics, all from Polytechnic University in New York City and Farmingdale, Long Island. He was a visiting scientist, aerospace engineer and research group leader for Wright Patterson Air Force Base Aerospace Research Laboratories in Dayton, Ohio; lecturer at the Von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium; and a research associate at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, N.Y. His other academic experience includes serving as dean of engineering at the University of Rhode Island in Kingston; associate dean for research and professor at West Virginia University, Morgantown; and professor of engineering at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

More information about Viets is available here…

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Nine MSOE students represented the university in competitions at the annual Wisconsin Future Business Leaders of America/Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA/PBL) State Leadership Conference held in Oshkosh, Wis., March 13-14. The state conference and competitions served as a qualifying round for the FBLA/PBL National Conference to be held in June in Chicago. By virtue of placing first or second in their events, all nine of the MSOE students competing at the state conference qualified for the national competition.

Competitive events included both written examinations and judged demonstrations in business and information technology subjects. 2015_FBLAPBL.jpgCongratulations to following students on their success:

Timm Berger, international business, Hamburg, Germany
1st place: International Business
4th place: Business Decision Making (team event with Forrest Fink)

Forrest Fink, international business, Milwaukee
1st place: Management Concepts
2nd place: Marketing Concepts
4th place: Business Decision Making (team event with Timm Berger)

Ian Hyzy, management information systems, Midlothian, Ill.
1st place: Computer Applications
1st place: Information Management
2nd place: Computer Concepts

Michael LeRoy, management information systems, Kenosha, Wis.
1st place: Computer Concepts
2nd place: Networking Concepts

Dan Pappas, business management, Franklin, Wis.
1st place: Business Decision Making (team event with Spencer Rode)

Aleah Quast, business management, Whitewater, Colo.
1st place: Macroeconomics
3rd place: Microeconomics

Spencer Rode, business management, Winthrop Harbor, Ill.
1st place: Business Decision Making (team event with Dan Pappas)
2nd place: Impromptu Speaking

Carl Saffron, management information systems, Hartland, Wis.
1st place: Cyber Security
1st place: Networking Concepts

John von Helms, mechanical engineering and business management, Ingleside, Ill.
2nd place: International Business
2nd place: Business Communication

More than 100 college students attended this year’s state conference and competitions. The nine students representing MSOE are members of the university’s Phi Beta Lambda Chapter, a student organization open to all MSOE majors. Several Midwest business schools were represented at the state event including UW-Madison, UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater. The Rader School of Business has been affiliated with FBLA/PBL since 2006. Dr. Trina Moskalik, assistant professor, is the group’s advisor.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2015_MCAA_Chapter_of_Year.JPG.jpgCongratulations to MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student organization. They were named the MCAA Student Chapter of the Year at the MCAA annual convention, which was held in March in Maui, Hawaii.

The award recognizes an MCAA student chapter for outstanding achievement as an organization of students who are planning careers in the mechanical construction industry. It recognizes exceptional achievement in governance and leadership, membership recruiting, fundraising, community involvement, and career development.

Dr. Blake Wentz, chair of the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, and four students represented the group in Hawaii to accept the award. Pictured, left to right are James Brown, CBS sportscaster and convention keynote speaker, Rachel Lynde, Jill Vande Boom, SaraBeth Haworth, Leah Hendricks and Dr. Wentz, MCAA group advisor.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Bookworm.jpgThrough a series of very fortunate events, more than 20 works by Carl Spitzweg have found their way to Milwaukee. Many fine examples of the artist’s work from the Grohmann Museum Collection–including The Bookworm (on permanent loan from the Milwaukee Public Library) and The Poor Poet–are joined by those from the Eckhart G. Grohmann Collection and the Milwaukee Art Museum, creating a special opportunity to display them together. The result is Carl Spitzweg in Milwaukee, a one-of-a-kind exhibition displayed in an entirely new gallery at the Grohmann Museum, created specifically for this purpose.

An opening reception for the exhibit and the gallery will be held Thursday, April 9 from 5 to 8 p.m. At 6:30 p.m. Dr. Eckhart Grohmann will provide opening remarks and Barbara Brown Lee, chief educator emeritus of the Milwaukee Art Museum will present a gallery talk. Admission is free for this special event.

The Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, is open to the public Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 6 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults; $3 for students and seniors; free for children under 12. MSOE students (with ID), alumni, faculty and staff are admitted free, and patrons showing a valid city of Milwaukee Public Library card also enjoy free admission.poor_poet.jpg

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,800 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

img_grohmann_tower-380x213.jpgMSOE’s Grohmann Tower has been named one of the Top Projects of 2014 by The Daily Reporter and among the winners of the Milwaukee Business Journal’s 2015 Real Estate Awards.

The Top Projects award is given to the most challenging, innovative and awe-inspiring Wisconsin construction projects from 2014 that:

  • have a lasting effect on the community in which they were built
  • had serious challenges that were met by contractors on the job
  • used construction innovations
  • served their purpose with extraordinary efficiency and style
  • showed excellence in planning, engineering, design and construction management.

 

In April, 17 projects will be honored by the Milwaukee Business Journal and first-place winners and “Project of the Year” will be announced at their real estate awards program. The awards honor real estate projects that make an impact in the Milwaukee area.

The Grohmann Tower is MSOE’s newest and most desirable on-campus housing option for upperclassmen. The apartment building opened at the beginning of this academic year and 184 students moved into 102 studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments on the fourth through ninth floors. The second phase of construction is currently under way to complete apartments and meeting spaces on the 10th through 14th floors.

The building originally was slated to be an extended-stay hotel, but the project went bankrupt while it was under construction in 2008. The building is named after Dr. Eckhart Grohmann, the major donor who made the project possible.

Uihlein-Wilson Architects were the project developers, and Hunzinger Construction Company was the general contractor.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

StPats.jpgGet ready for one of the biggest celebrations of the year at MSOE this week! St. Patrick’s Week is a yearly tradition at MSOE that dates all the way back to the 1930s. Saint Patrick, who was a Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland in the 5th century, is considered to be the patron saint of engineers. Born in Roman Britain, he was captured by Irish pirates as a teenager and taken to Ireland as a slave. He escaped back to Britain after six years of enslavement and became a cleric. Later in life, he returned to Ireland to serve as an ordained bishop. He also introduced to the Irish elements of Roman technology to which he had been exposed back in Britain, including the construction of churches featuring arches. This led to Saint Patrick’s reverence as the patron saint of engineers.

Today, more than 2,000 years later, people around the world celebrate St. Patrick’s Day every year on March 17. Milwaukee School of Engineering takes this one step further and holds an eight-day celebration with fun-filled competitions and events. Students form teams and compete against one another to win points and prizes. At the end of the week, the team with the most points wins the St. Pat’s Overall Winner Trophy and the “St. Patrick” title!

20140317 St Pats Carnival_142.jpg

The celebration commenced with a few events this past weekend, including the Egg Drop, in which teams engineered a contraption meant to protect an egg from a three-story fall with only the items they were given. Teams also competed in a Trivia Scavenger Hunt in which trivia questions were broadcasted over 91.7FM WMSE that team members had to answer correctly to accumulate points. On Monday, there was a carnival in the afternoon with free games and T-shirts as well as a dinner of traditional Irish fare in the evening, both of which were held on the third floor of the CC.

Plenty of other fun events will take place over the course of this week. Teams will compete in a set of mental and physical competitions in the “Engineering O’lympics” on Tuesday in the Kern Center. Wednesday will bring a food drive as well as a costume contest before the men’s volleyball game in the Kern Center. A “Cinna-Bonfire” will take place on Thursday where attendees can enjoy a full-sized Cinnabon next to multiple bonfires in the RWJ parking lot. Finally, with the weekend will come a Proclamation Signing in the CC on Friday, and a St. Pat’s Dance on Saturday in the Todd Wehr.

Visit the St. Pat’s Week group for more information on the festivities and to vote for your favorite competing team! Also, be sure to take some pictures of the shenanigans and use the #MSOEStPats hashtag to share them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

In early March, MSOE’s student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) hosted the 2015 IIE North Central Regional Conference for 170 students from 10 universities. Graduate student Patrick Gathof ’14 and IE sophomore Collin Seubert led a committee of 20 MSOE students to plan and organize the event.

Adjunct Professor Kim Pettiford ’93, ’99, senior director of human resources at Harley-Davidson Motor Company, was the keynote speaker on the opening night and orchestrated an activity with the students to break the ice and get them excited for the days ahead.

Students had the opportunity to tour Blood Center of Wisconsin, FedEx SmartPost, GKN Sinter Metals, MillerCoors, Harley-Davidson, Master Lock, Nordco, Rexnord, Spirit Manufacturing or UPS. They also enjoyed a networking lunch with representatives from Anderson Corporation, Direct Supply, FedEx SmartPost, Harley-Davidson, IIE Milwaukee Chapter, J.W. Speaker Corporation, John Deere, Joy Global, Master Lock, Mayo Clinic, McGraw-Hill Education, Nordco, Rockwell Collins, UPS and the VA Medical Center.

IIE_Paper_Winners.jpgSix students presented their work during the paper competition and Molly Kotrba from MSOE was the winner. This marks the third year in a row that MSOE won the competition with Gathof winning in 2014 and Eric Pearson ’13 winning in 2013. Kotrba will represent the North Central Region in the International competition at the IIE Annual Expo in Nashville in May.

The conference concluded with professional workshops, a social event and a closing banquet at the Milwaukee County Zoo with representatives from the local IIE professional chapter and company representatives. IE alumna Stefanie Zeiler ’91 was the keynote speaker. Zeiler has held a variety of process improvement positions in GE, Walt Disney World, Merrill Lynch and McGraw-Hill Education where she currently is a senior director in strategic reengineering.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Deans_Honors.jpgMSOE’s Winter Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

Download the Dean's List | Download the Honors List

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Career Fair 2014_35.jpgStudents and parents often wonder if all of the hard work and tuition dollars of a college education will pay off in the end. It does if you graduate from MSOE.

Recent data from PayScale.com highlights which colleges and universities in the United States offer the best return on investment (ROI). On the 2015 College Education ROI Rankings, MSOE offers the best ROI in Wisconsin and is 89th best in the country. PayScale.com data also shows that MSOE alumni enjoy the highest average starting salaries and mid-career salaries of any college or university in Wisconsin.

Why does it make sense to attend MSOE?

  • 96% placement rate for the 2013-14 graduates
  • Average starting salary for the class of 2013-14 was $56,522
  • Average class size: 21
  • Student-to-faculty ratio: 15:1
  • Professors have an average of seven years industry experience
  • No teaching assistants
  • Students get an average 600 hours experience in industry-standard laboratories
  • Four-year graduation guarantee
  • 14th Best University in the Midwest, 14th Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs, and 9th Best Mechanical Engineering Program in 2015 according to U.S. News & World Report
  • One of America’s Top Colleges according to Forbes.com
  • Named one of the Best in the Midwest Colleges by The Princeton Review

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

ASD_Nursing.jpgThe first class of Accelerated Second Degree B.S. in Nursing students graduated on Feb. 28. Nine students completed this degree program which was designed specifically for the adult working professional who already has earned a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree in another discipline and is looking to change careers.

“Once I decided I wanted to be a nurse, I knew I wanted it to be a quick process since I already have a four-year degree,” said Allison Patterson. She has a bachelor’s degree in biology and minor in chemistry. “MSOE was offering an accelerated program that didn’t make you jump through hoops in order to get accepted. And I had heard wonderful things about the nurses that come out of the program. Having a high-end nursing simulation lab was also a major benefit of this program.”

“I wanted to be able to complete nursing school in as little time as possible, and MSOE was the first place I found where I could complete my degree in only 18 months. I also liked that MSOE offers a wide variety of clinical experiences,” said Michelle Lenz, who previously earned a bachelor’s degree in biology.

The program at MSOE features a compressed, year-round curriculum which enables students to enter the workforce as professional nurses in approximately 18 months.

According to Adam Pischke, it “offers the opportunity to get a BSN without having to retake all of the humanities and social sciences already taken as an undergraduate.” Pischke has a bachelor’s degree in neurobiology.

“I thought it was a well-rounded program with lots of diverse clinical experience and plenty of face-to-face time with professors,” said Leah Wilde, who will work in the cardiac step-down unit at Froedtert Hospital after graduation.

“I would recommend this program to anyone who is willing to work hard and know that they want to become a vital part of the nursing community,” said Patteron. “It’s hard to find such dedicated professors who are willing to sacrifice their own time to see you succeed.”

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

In February 2015, senior biomedical engineering students were asked to present posters describing their senior projects at Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). All students at MSOE participate in a senior project, which are a culmination of all they’ve learned in their time at MSOE. Biomedical engineering students begin their senior capstone project at the end of their sophomore year. By senior year they put what they’ve learned to work and complete their capstone project by applying quantitative analysis and systematic synthesis to develop a prototype product for a real-world application.

This year’s projects include:

MCW_Spina.jpgIn Utero Spina Bifida Cystica Repair System
Team: Cody Dziuk, Ayushman Rai and Nik Stasinopoulos
The purpose of this project is to create a toolbox of approaches for a biomaterial delivery system for use in the in utero repair of spina bifida. The minimally invasive device will be used to deliver a protective biomaterial to cover the exposed spinal cord of the fetus while it is in the womb. This toolbox will be given to Amy Wagner, MD at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin to use when the final biomaterial is chosen by her team. To show that the device is functional with a mock material, a mock uterus will be created to simulate the surgery.

 

 

 

Total Knee Replacement Sizing ToolBE_Poster_Froedtert.JPG.jpg
Team: Garrison Glowniak, Enyinnaya Okwulehie, Travis Pischel (ME major) and Alexandra Swanson
The goal of this device is to make the knee replacement process more universal and help decrease the number of revision surgeries needed to correct for improper fit and alignment of knee implants. This measuring device will be used to measure the medial and lateral gaps that occur between the tibial plate and femoral component prior to the implant trial being completely installed by spreading two prongs until they come in contact with the femoral component to see what size trial is needed. Currently, the practice of fitting an implant involves a hands-on, trial and error approach, in which the surgeon manipulates the knee to simulate the typical range of motion. This process often leads to an implant size change, which requires the surgeon to remove the current trials, recut the bones, and install a new size trial, which adds a substantial amount of time.

MCW_Rat.jpgTraumatic Brain Injury Research Device
Team: Alex Jandrin, Ryan Damask, Amy Gustafson and Andrea Winegar
This project involves creating a helmet-like device used with an energy delivery device to induce traumatic brain injury in rats. The helmet will be able to transfer energy to induce injury in the coronal, sagittal and transverse planes. The helmet will also minimize the slip between the device and the rat’s skull during energy transfer. The helmet design will allow for the user to be able to set up testing in a short amount of time without harming the rat. The helmet will attach to the pneumatic energy delivery device that will cause a specific degree of head injury.

Viets.jpgPresident Hermann Viets, Ph.D. will retire from Milwaukee School of Engineering on June 30, 2015. He is only the fourth president in MSOE’s 112-year history, and currently the longest serving president at any college or university in Wisconsin. Viets has guided the university for 24 years. During that time the university’s campus footprint has grown dramatically and expanded degree programs fueled enrollment.

According to the American Council on Education, in 2011 the average length of service for a university president was seven years. MSOE is fortunate to have Viets at the helm and with the long-term vision he provided, the university is poised to continue its success for a long time.

“MSOE’s national academic reputation has grown under the steadfast leadership of Hermann Viets,” said Scott Moon, chairman of the MSOE Board of Regents. “His vision has kept MSOE firmly on the path for success and students choose to attend the university because they know they’ll achieve success in their careers upon graduation.”

“Throughout Dr. Viets’ tenure, the economy has seen ups and downs, yet the demand for MSOE graduates hasn’t wavered,” he continued. “Employers know that MSOE graduates have an immediate and significant impact on their workplace. At Res Manufacturing we hired our first MSOE student in 1995 as an intern, and last year he became president of that company.” Moon is chairman and CEO of DLSM Inc., a holding company comprised of Res Manufacturing and Kondex Corporation.

Viets’ vision for MSOE is to remain at the forefront of professional education with an emphasis on both theory and technology coupled with an intensity of appropriate laboratory experience and career practice. He has worked to broaden the academic scope of the university while maintaining its “application-oriented” philosophy and at the same time supporting those initiatives that promote a well-rounded college experience.

During Viets’ presidency, MSOE has implemented new programs including several undergraduate international study-abroad programs and a baccalaureate two-degree program. The university added a number of Bachelor of Science degrees such as actuarial science, biomolecular engineering, construction management, nursing, operations research and software engineering, as well as a freshman-to-master’s degree in civil engineering. New Master of Science degrees also were added, including perfusion, construction and business management, medical informatics (a joint program with the Medical College of Wisconsin), nursing, an MBA, MBA in education leadership and MBA in STEM leadership.

Technology continues to advance at an unbelievably fast pace as a generation of STEM professionals is beginning to retire. Recognizing the greater need to fill the pipeline with young students who are prepared to pursue a STEM education at the collegiate level, Viets partnered with Robert Kern, MSOE Regent and retired chairman of Generac Power Systems, and the Kern Family Foundation to bring Project Lead The Way to Wisconsin. This nationwide program is helping curb the ever growing shortage of STEM professionals by encouraging K-12 students to enter those fields. PLTW is a leading provider of curricular programs featuring hands-on, project-based engineering, biomedical sciences and computer science courses that expose students to these areas of study and provide a foundation and proven path to college and career success. MSOE is the National Affiliate University for PLTW programs in the state of Wisconsin. As the affiliate, MSOE’s role is to train middle and high school teachers in the curriculum so they can teach it in their respective schools; serve as an accreditation agent; educate high school counselors about the program; provide transcripted undergraduate course credit for high school students who complete the PTLW classes; and advocate for and raise awareness of the program throughout the region.

The Kern Family Foundation, a major proponent of PLTW, played a significant role in providing Wisconsin with the distinction of having the fourth largest number of schools that have adopted the PLTW curriculum. MSOE is the second largest PLTW teacher training site in the nation, and has trained more than 1,500 teachers.

MSOE is the only university in the state of Wisconsin to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in BioMolecular Engineering. The program came to fruition because of Viets’ vision, the hard work of MSOE faculty and staff, and the support of Kern and his wife Patricia. The program has put MSOE on the map as a leading institution in biomolecular engineering education, with facilities that rival those of industry leaders.

Students at MSOE are encouraged to develop their entrepreneurial skills. Under Viets’ leadership, the university’s Center for Entrepreneurship was established to advance creativity, innovation and entrepreneurialism and develop success in all fields and disciplines. MSOE received a grant from the Kern Family Foundation to help build a spirit of entrepreneurship among students, faculty and alumni. The KEEN grant, MSOE’s Center for Entrepreneurship and the Rader School of Business provide resources to launch businesses, create new products and turn innovation into success. KEEN (Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network) is a consortium of 20 universities around the U.S. that strive to instill an entrepreneurial mindset in undergraduate engineering and technology students. Its mission is to graduate engineers who will contribute to business success; and in doing so, transform the American workforce.

The university’s downtown campus increased to 20 acres with the addition of Krueger Hall; Rosenberg Hall, which houses the Rader School of Business; Humphrey House; the Kern Center, a 210,000-square-foot recreation, athletic, health and wellness center; the Grohmann Museum which houses the Eckhart Grohmann Man at Work art collection; Pamela and Hermann Viets Field, a soccer/lacrosse field built atop a 780-car parking garage; and the new Grohmann Tower student apartment building. The Murphy House, in Belgium, Wis., serves as a retreat center for MSOE and provides rooms for seminars. The two-acre property was donated by the late Greta Werwath Murphy, the daughter of MSOE’s founder.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the world’s most comprehensive art collection dedicated to the evolution of human work. The Man at Work collection features more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures from 1580 to the present. The collection and the funds to acquire and renovate the museum building were donated by Eckhart Grohmann, MSOE Regent. Students are learning their disciplines with an appreciation of how the fields have evolved. They are able to see the history of health care, business and engineering in the pieces at the Grohmann Museum.

Other highlights include MSOE’s implementation of the state’s first all-notebook computer campus at a university, and the establishment of the Rader School of Business and MSOE School of Nursing. In addition, the Pieper Family Endowed Chair for Servant-Leadership and Uihlein/Spitzer Chair of Entrepreneurship were established.

Viets received a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering, and both a Master of Science and Ph.D. in Astronautics, all from Polytechnic University in New York City and Farmingdale, Long Island. He was a visiting scientist, aerospace engineer and research group leader for Wright Patterson Air Force Base Aerospace Research Laboratories in Dayton, Ohio; lecturer at the Von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium; and a research associate at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, N.Y. His other academic experience includes serving as dean of engineering at the University of Rhode Island in Kingston; associate dean for research and professor at West Virginia University, Morgantown; and professor of engineering at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

In 1997, Viets was named “Engineer of the Year” by Engineers & Scientists of Milwaukee Inc. (known today as STEM Forward), He also received the 2008 World Citizen Award from the International Institute of Wisconsin and the 2014 CTSI Bolger Award. He holds seven U.S. patents.

Viets announced his retirement to the MSOE Board of Regents in July 2014. A search committee led by Moon is currently conducting a nationwide search for Viets’ successor.

MSOE’s presidents include:

  • Oscar Werwath, founder, 1903-1948
  • Karl Werwath, 1948-1977
  • Robert R. Spitzer, Ph.D., 1977-1991
  • Hermann Viets, Ph.D., 1991-2015

 

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,800 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Shuttle.jpgWhenever a Wind Chill Advisory is issued by the National Weather Service, the MSOE Public Safety Department will begin operation of the Campus Shuttle Service starting at 7:30 a.m. (Monday through Friday) instead of the normal shuttle starting time of 2 p.m. This change is the result of a suggestion from the MSOE Student Government Association (SGA). A Wind Chill Advisory is issued when the combination of very cold air temperatures and wind will create a wind chill of 25 degrees below zero or colder for three hours or longer.

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The Public Safety Department operates a campus shuttle service to provide safe transportation to and from all campus buildings and parking lots/ structures. The shuttle service is available to all members of the campus community. Call (414) 277-7464 to request the campus shuttle service.

Regular shuttle hours of operation

Sunday – Thursday: 2 to 10:30 p.m.
Friday: 2 to 8 p.m.
Note:  There is no shuttle service from 6 to 6:30 p.m. due to the driver’s required 30 minute lunch period.

Shuttle Service Area

The campus shuttle provides service to and from MSOE campus buildings, parking lots and the student parking structure. The MSOE shuttle service boundaries are: N. Water Street on the west, N. Van Buren St. on the east, E. Ogden St. on the north, and E. Wells St. on the south.  All requests for shuttle service must originate or terminate at an MSOE building, parking lot, or the Viets Field parking structure.

Although the campus shuttle service is primarily an on-campus service, the campus shuttle may go outside the designated service area to the following locations, if on-campus conveyance volume and weather conditions permit*:

  1. Amtrak Station, 433 W. St. Paul Avenue
  2. Greyhound Bus Company, 433 W. St. Paul Ave.
  3. Mega Bus Company, 433 W. St. Paul Ave.
  4. Badger Bus Company, 635 N. James Lovell Drive
  5. Documented medical appointments or emergency treatment at:
    • Mount Sinai Hospital, 945 N. 12th St.
    • Columbia-St. Mary Urgent Care, 734 N. Jackson St.
    • Aurora Health Center, 1575 N. River Center Dr.
    • Aurora Urgent Care, 946 N. Van Buren St.
    • Farwell Avenue Clinic, 1845 N. Farwell Ave.

All requests for conveyances outside the normal shuttle boundaries end at 10 p.m. (Sun.-Thurs.).
* Note: During expanded operation due to a wind chill advisory the shuttle service is restricted to the campus shuttle boundaries listed above and does not go to or from these off-campus locations.

Requests for shuttle service

Requests for the campus shuttle service are processed in the order they are received and individuals requesting campus shuttle service occasionally may experience a delay in service due to other pending requests for this service. As a service to the students, the shuttle driver will attempt to provide an estimated time of arrival for the shuttle pick-up when the call for service is first received. However, students need to keep in mind that this is only an estimate and the actual pick-up time can vary from the estimated time due to the number of pending calls at the time; the amount of traffic on the road; and the current weather conditions.
The shuttle does not operate on Saturdays, student breaks, quarter breaks, holiday breaks or during the summer months.
While we do everything we can to make sure the shuttle service is available during the stated hours of operation, this service is not guaranteed due to unexpected staffing shortages or mechanical breakdown of the shuttle vehicle.
If you have any questions regarding the shuttle service please contact the Public Safety Department (414) 277-7169.

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