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Originally published March 26, 2013

A team of MSOE computing students finished in second place at the Midwest Regional Cyber Defense Competition. The team’s involvement marked the first time MSOE participated in the event, earning a trip to regionals by qualifying one week earlier in the Wisconsin state competition.

The MSOE team was sponsored by the Rader School of Business and included students from the computer engineering, management information systems and software engineering degree programs.  The regional “Cyber Defense” team included: James Thurber (Team Captain – MIS), Nick Gorden (MIS), Thomas Gulke (MIS), Ryan Miller (MIS), Gregory Peyton (MIS), Grant Ridder (CE), and Tyler Tiegs (CE). Joining the team at the state qualifying event were Mike Pancani (CE) and Ryan Ponstein (SE).

The nine-state Midwest Regional CCDC is sponsored annually by the National Resource Center for Systems Security and Information Assurance (CSSIA) with funding from the National Science Foundation. More than 50 teams participated in the state event, and 10 teams qualified for the regional event. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology took first place and Northern Kentucky University took third place.

The 16-hour competition focused on the operational aspect of managing and protecting an existing commercial network infrastructure. Students demonstrated their knowledge in an operational environment by securing the network from a team of professional hackers, while performing business tasks and keeping business services online. The Midwest CCDC offered a unique opportunity for students and industry professionals to interact and discuss many of the security and operational challenges the students will face as they enter the job market.  Unlike traditional “hack and defend” or “capture the flag” contests, this competition tested each team’s ability to operate, secure, manage and maintain a corporate network.

Several faculty members from Rader School of Business were involved with the Cyber Defense team. Dr. Jeffrey Blessing served as the team’s overall advisor. Carol Mannino, associate professor; Mary Jo Suminski, instructor; and Melinda Davies, lecturer, were on-site advisors during the state and regional competition.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 25, 2013

For the second year in a row, Blake Wentz, MSOE assistant professor and construction management program director, received the Mechanical Contractors Association of America’s (MCAA) Educator of the Year Award. Wentz is also the MCAA Student Chapter advisor at MSOE, and guided the team to a first place finish in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition.

MCAA President Mac Lynch and Career Development Committee Chairman Troy Aichele presented the award at MCAA’s annual convention. The committee chose Wentz for his mentoring ability, industry knowledge and involvement, and active participation in Student Chapter Program activities. Wentz’s outstanding abilities are revealed in the success of the MCAA Student Chapter at MSOE, which won the 2011 and 2013 MCAA Student Chapter Competitions and was a finalist in 2012.

MCAA serves the unique needs of approximately 2,500 firms involved in heating, air conditioning, refrigeration, plumbing, piping and mechanical service. MCAA provides members with high-quality educational materials and programs to help them attain the highest level of managerial and technical expertise. MCAA includes the Mechanical Service Contractors of America, the Plumbing Contractors of America, the Manufacturer/Supplier Council, the Mechanical Contracting Education and Research Foundation and the National Certified Pipe Welding Bureau.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 21, 2013

All registered Professional Engineers (P.E.) in the state of Wisconsin are now required to complete 30 professional development hours (PDHs) every two years in order to maintain their license. Wisconsin is the 39th state to require PDHs, which helps ensure the viability and quality of the profession.

    To help P.E.’s meet this requirement, MSOE is offering a series of Professional Engineers Advancing Knowledge (PEAK) mini-conferences.  These cost-effective events bring engineering and technical professionals together and allow them to share their knowledge and experiences. Attendees can earn PDHs at a PEAK mini-conference in two ways: (1) One PDH is earned for every hour of session attendance; and (2)  Attendees may submit a topic idea to MSOE and give a presentation; the first time the presentation occurs, the presenter earns two PDHs for each one hour of content presented.

    The PEAK mini-conference is a departure from the traditional continuing education model because it allows attendees to earn PDHs for both attendance and delivery of relevant engineering and engineering-related knowledge. Furthermore, it leverages the knowledge of seasoned engineering peers.

    The first PEAK mini-conference will be Saturday, May 11 at MSOE’s Rosenberg Hall, 1235 N. Milwaukee St. Visit the PEAK website or call (414) 277-2345 to learn more.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. MSOE’s engineering programs are accredited by ABET. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 24, 2013

MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student chapter took first place in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition. Twenty-five universities from across the nation submitted entries. Teams had to submit proposals on a project involving the installation of the HVAC and plumbing systems in the Space Exploration Center Building at the NASA Research Park in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Bidders were also encouraged to propose design features that exceed LEED Platinum requirements and a post-construction service component.

MSOE’s team traveled to San Antonio in March to present their proposals at MCAA’s national convention. They competed against Northeastern University, Southern Polytechnic State University, and University of Washington.

David Taylor (MCAA student president), Brittany Campos (MCAA student vice president), Julie Burg, Matt Brophy, Mitch Cooper, Jason Jacobson and Brittany Leis gave a 15-minute presentation and answered questions in front of a panel of mechanical contractors and conference attendees. Several other students worked on the proposal and attended the conference and competition as alternates: MaryBeth Groth, Nick Lehman, Tyler Mrowiec and Marly Trier. Blake Wentz, assistant professor and construction management program director in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 12, 2013

MSOE’s School of Nursing will offer an Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing beginning in Fall 2013. This degree program was designed specifically for the adult working professional who has already earned a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree in another discipline and is looking to change careers.

MSOE’s Accelerated Second Degree B.S. in Nursing is a compressed, year-round curriculum designed to enable students to enter the workforce as professional nurses in approximately 16 months, assuming the student has met all of the prerequisites. Most students who already have a bachelor’s degree will have satisfied those prerequisites as part of their undergraduate education.

“With more than 50 percent of recent college graduates under- or unemployed in the United States, many are interested in returning to school to earn a degree that is in demand, such as nursing,” said Dr. Debra Jenks, MSOE School of Nursing chairperson. “We are excited to offer an option for those adults who want to change careers, but don’t want to invest another four years of their time earning a second degree.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of registered nurses is expected to grow 26 percent from 2010 to 2020, which is faster than average for all occupations. In 2011-2012, all of MSOE’s nursing graduates obtained gainful employment, as evidenced by the 100 percent placement rate.

MSOE just completed construction of a $3 million, 25,000 square-foot suite of nursing labs and is planning a grand opening celebration during National Nurses Week on May 6. The new space nearly quadruples the university’s original nursing lab space, and will accommodate a 20 percent increase in enrollment for the nursing program. MSOE’s School of Nursing is known for its extremely high placement rates, advanced laboratory technologies, guaranteed placement in clinical rotations, and small class sizes.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 6, 2013

MSOE alumnus Brent Verhyen ’12, assistant project manager for Hunzinger Construction shows us a few key places in the athletic field construction project. He explains where the underground parking ramps will be located, the main entrance to the future athletic field, and even takes us inside the construction trailer for a quick look at drawings of the underground ventilation system.

Originally published February 25, 2013

The old adage, “Time flies when you’re having fun,” certainly applies at MSOE. It seems like just yesterday that the university was celebrating its centennial year, and in 2013, MSOE is celebrating its 110th anniversary.

    The past decade was marked with many achievements. The physical footprint of the campus grew with the addition of the Kern Center and Grohmann Museum, as did the breadth of activities for students. In 2013 another new facility, the athletic field and parking complex, will open, bringing the MSOE campus to 20 acres. In addition, the university will open a new suite of nursing laboratories and classrooms.

    During the past decade MSOE was the first in the nation and/or Wisconsin to establish an endowed chair of servant-leadership; take first place in both the Design-Build and Commercial Construction competitions; gain the first ever, back-to-back national honor of having Academic All-Americans in the same sport; offer a B.S. in biomolecular engineering, with a suite of labs to accompany; and offer a five-year, freshman-to-master’s degree in civil engineering.

    On the technology front, MSOE launched a virtual visit, mobile website and mobile app. The university also revamped the college admission process by creating “Bridge,” a dynamic, online social community for prospective students that now has more than 6,000 members.

    Since 2004, MSOE has served as the National Affiliate University for Project Lead The Way’s Pathways to Engineering program in Wisconsin, and was selected as the Midwest affiliate for the PLTW Biomedical Sciences program in 2011.

    Please visit our Facebook Timeline which highlights some of MSOE’s major accomplishments from the past 110 years.

    The future is bright for MSOE, as it is for our students. Graduates enjoy an extremely high placement rate of 94 percent; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.

Originally published March 1, 2013

Students from 20 Wisconsin high schools and one middle school have spent a lot of their free time doing scientific research this school year. The 215 students participated in MSOE’s SMART Teams (Students Modeling A Research Topic) program, where they worked with a teacher from their school and a researcher to investigate proteins.

    On Friday, March 1 from 4 to 6 p.m., the students will present their findings during a Poster Session at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the cafeteria lobby, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd.

    The SMART Teams program began in 2001 with one team. Since then the program has grown to include 21 teams in the Milwaukee area and another 40 throughout the nation, and nearly 2,500 students have participated. They collaborate with researchers and scientists at universities and laboratories across the country. These SMART Teams construct physical models of proteins to help researchers investigate important proteins—and they’re doing it as an extracurricular activity.

    The program was developed by MSOE’s Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM) and grew out of a collaboration between the CBM and researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin, UW-Milwaukee, Marquette University and the Blood Research Institute.

      Many of the students who were part of a SMART Team have gone on to pursue degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

    This year’s participants included:

Brookfield Academy High School
Basis for Prokaryotic Selectivity of the Antibiotic Paromomycin
Teacher:  Dr. Robbyn Tuinstra
Mentor:  Madhusudan Dey, Ph.D., Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Brookfield Central High School
The Inhibition Mission:  DHQase and the Shikimate Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Teacher:  Ms. Louise Thompson
Mentor:  Sanjib Bhattacharyya, Ph.D., Deputy Laboratory Director at City of Milwaukee Health Department

Brown Deer High School
Feel the Burn, then Feel the Death.  ExoU as a Phospholipase
Teacher:  Mr. David Sampe
Mentor:  Dara W. Frank, Ph.D., Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin

Cedarburg High School
Calcium-calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase II:  An Unforgettable Story
Teacher:  Ms. Karen Tiffany
Mentors:  Audra Kramer, Kanwardeep Kaleka and Nashaat Gerges, Ph.D., Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin

Cudahy High School
Wrinkle Release:  The Entry Mechanism of Botulinum Neurotoxin
Teacher:  Mr. Daniel Koslakiewicz
Mentors:  Andrew Karalewitz, Ph.D. and Joseph Barbieri, Ph.D., Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin

Grafton High School
TB or Not TB:  That is Our Question The Role of Interleukin-12 Receptor in the Immune System and Preventing Tuberculosis
Teachers:  Mr. Daniel Goetz and Ms. Fran Grant
Mentors:  Halli Miller M.S. and Richard Robinson Ph. D., Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin

Greenfield High School
The Future of Whole-Genome Sequencing:  MGMT Mutations in a Family Could Be Linked to Cervical Cancer
Teacher:  Ms. Julie Fangmann
Mentor:  Elizabeth Worthey, Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Pediatrics and the Human and Molecular Genetic Center

Kettle Moraine High School
Gone With the Wnt:  Role of GSK-3
Teacher:  Mr. Steve Plum
Mentor:  Anil Challa, Ph.D., Biotechnology Engineering Center, Medical College of Wisconsin

Laconia High School
Cascading into the Thrombin-Thrombomodulin Complex:  Comprehending a Substitution in Thrombomodulin
Teacher:  Ms. Jodie Garb
Mentor:  Rashmi Sood, Ph.D., Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin

Marquette University High School
One Indole Ring to Rule Them All:  How Modeling of Naltrindole Bound to the Delta Opioid Receptor Can Aid the Development of Novel Analgesics
Teachers:  Mr. Keith Klestinski and Mr. Carl Kaiser
Mentor:  Christopher W. Cunningham, Ph.D., School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin

Messmer High School
R61 D, D-peptidase Complexed with Helen-1, a Species-Specific Cephalosporin:  One “Hel”-en of an Antibiotic
Teachers:  Ms. Carol Johnson and Ms. Meg Garland
Mentor:  Nicholas R. Silvaggi, Ph.D., Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Milwaukee Academy of Science
Cut, Copy and Mutate:  EcoRI and its Function in Genetic Engineering
Teachers:  Mr. Kevin Paprocki and Mr. Tyler Reed
Mentor:  Vishwakanth Y. Potharla, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Saint Dominic Middle School
2A Protease from Human Rhinovirus 2
Teacher:  Ms. Donna LaFlamme
Mentor:  William Jackson, Ph.D., Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin

Saint Joan Antida High School
Three Blind Mice:  A Mutation in ADAM17 is Responsible for Embryonic Eyelid Closure Defect in Woe Mice
Teacher:  Ms. Cynthia McLinn
Mentor:  Duska Sidjanin, Ph.D., Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin

Shorewood High School
Red Rover, Red Rover, Send BCCP Over: Coordinating Catalysis in Pyruvate Carboxylase
Teacher:  Ms. Lalitha Murali
Mentor:  Adam D. Lietzan, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Biological Sciences, Marquette University

Valders High School
“Two Birds, One Stone”:  Reduction of HMBPP by the Iron-sulfur Protein (IspH) for Isoprene Synthesis
Teacher:  Mr. Joe Kinscher
Mentor:  Eric Singsaas, Ph.D., Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and Research Director, Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology

Waunakee High School
Take a Walk on the 5 Prime Side:  Bacterial Replication by Helicase DnaB
Teacher:  Ms. Michelle Knatz
Mentor:  Sarah Wessel, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wauwatosa West High School
Transthyretin (TTR):  Carrier of Thyroxine and Its Evil Twin (Environmental Pollutants)
Teacher:  Ms. Mary Anne Haasch
Mentors:  Joseph McGraw, Ph.D., and Cameron Patterson, School of Pharmacy, Concordia University

Westosha Central High School
Transportin’ with Transportin:  A Nuclear Import Mechanism
Teacher:  Mr. Jon Kao
Mentor:  Mark T. McNally, Ph.D., Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Wisconsin

Whitefish Bay High School
GABAA Receptor: Knocked Out
Teachers:  Ms. Paula Krukar, Ms. Marisa Roberts, Ms. Lisa Krueger and Ms. Katie Brown
Mentor:  Robert Peoples, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University

Wisconsin Virtual Learning
PEDF:  An Angiogenesis Inhibitor and Its Role in Glioblastoma Multiforme
Teacher:  Ms. Becki Van Keuren
Mentor:  Shama P. Mirza, Ph.D., Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 18, 2013

National Engineers Week (Feb. 17-23) highlights the pressing need for engineers in the United States. It is critical that young students are introduced to engineering and other STEM-related fields, and that high school graduates have the necessary science and math skills to pursue careers in these areas.

      Thanks to an endowed gift from Dr. Gene ’60 and Mrs. Patricia Carter, Milwaukee School of Engineering is expanding its efforts to meet those needs by establishing the Carter Academy at MSOE. The academy will deliver an intensive academic pre-college program for potentially qualified students who wish to enroll at MSOE but need further development of their science and math education.

    Students in the academy will be dually-enrolled at MSOE and will study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses that were unavailable to them in high school. Some of these courses may be co-mingled with MSOE courses.

    “The Carter Academy will bridge the gap from high school to MSOE for students who show high academic potential and an interest in pursuing a STEM-related career,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “This gift from Gene and Patricia Carter further expands our ability to develop a pipeline for students from middle school through high school, through MSOE and into their careers.”

      MSOE has a strong history of introducing young students to STEM careers through its summer programs, middle and high school competitions, partnerships with high schools, and also by serving as the Wisconsin affiliate for Project Lead The Way. MSOE graduates are in demand, as evidenced by the university’s 94 percent graduate placement rate. The average starting salary was $55,368 last year—higher than the median household income for the United States ($52,762, according to the U.S. Census Bureau).

    “It’s well-documented that there is a shortage of engineers in the United States,” said Dr. Carter. “Pat and I are excited to encourage and give young people the opportunity to attend MSOE and become engineers. It is our hope that the Carter Academy will make an impact on MSOE, the students served by the university and the local, state and national communities in which they reside.”

    Courses will begin in summer of 2013 at the Carter Academy. Highly skilled students who did not learn the necessary math, physics and chemistry in high school will get a second chance to prepare for full acceptance to MSOE.

    This contribution is one of many significant gifts to have been received by the university as a result of the John and Linda Mellowes Planned Giving Initiative, which is funded by the Charter Manufacturing Company Foundation Inc.

About Gene P. Carter
    Gene P. Carter earned a degree in electronic communications technology from MSOE in 1960. After graduation, Carter worked for Sandia Corp. as a technical staff assistant until 1966 when he accepted a position with Fairfield Semiconductor and in 1969 moved to National Semiconductor and later served as Director of Marketing.

    Carter then moved on to Apple Computer Inc. where he was vice president of sales and a member of the original management team from 1977 to 1984. He was responsible for creating the sales and distribution strategy for the company’s growth from zero to $938 million. Carter has worked as a private investor in electronics start-up companies and real estate partnerships since leaving Apple in 1984. He is the co-founder of Productivity Software Inc., the creator of Microsoft WORKS; Tigan Communications Inc.; and Portable Energy Products Inc. and was an early investor and board member of Chips and Technology, Aldus Corp. and Adobe Systems which later acquired Aldus Corp. Carter, who was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree from MSOE in 1995, lives in Saratoga, Calif., with his wife, Patricia. They have two grown children, Pam and Brian.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 24, 2013

A team of mechanical engineering students edged out a team of biomolecular engineers to take first place in the 7th annual MSOE Business Plan Competition.

    The winning plan introduced an electric kit designed to motorize skateboards. With approximately 18 million boardsport enthusiasts worldwide, Ferret Boards Motor Skateboard will set out to provide a custom motorization option for nearly any type of skateboard. For winning the competition, the team received $2,000. The second place team, DeriGen-Cellulose Hydrogels, received $1,500. Together, the first and second place finishers will represent MSOE at the Mason-Wells BizStarts Collegiate Business Plan Competition, a regional competition among 21 universities in southeastern Wisconsin that will be held at MSOE’s Todd Wehr Auditorium on April 25.

    The competition began earlier this school year when students and alumni were invited to present their business ideas. Nearly 100 students were part of the early stages of the competition. Five entries were selected as finalists and judged on both their plans and formal presentations. The MSOE Business Plan Competition is sponsored annually by MSOE’s Uihlein/Spitzer Center for Entrepreneurship. Dr. Jeffrey Blessing, professor, Rader School of Business, serves as the competition coordinator.

    The 2013 MSOE Business Plan Winners were:

1st Place ($2,000)
Ferret Boards Motor Skateboard
Matthew Brazeau, Mike Cosentino and Jake Schneider, mechanical engineering majors

    The Ferret is the starter kit that will allow skateboarders to reversibly modify their boards to be electrically driven while eliminating the need to have the kit professionally installed. The kit is a unique way to fully transform one’s existing board into a completely functional electric board. Riders will get to keep their own valued boards without permanent modification, making this a much simpler approach to owning an electric board compared to the alternatives. Ferret’s kit concept will give customers the option of having a desired kit installed professionally by Ferret onto a Ferret integration board (if ordered together) or installing the kit at home onto their existing board.

2nd Place ($1,500)
DeriGen-Cellulose Hydrogels
Jessica Axt, Kathleen Keough and Adam Schaenzer, biomolecular engineering majors

    The medical, pharmaceutical and agricultural industries demonstrate needs for various derivatives of cellulose in order to exploit the beneficial properties. DeriGen proposes to produce cellulose derivatives by moving production of cellulose into Escherichia coli giving the potential to create derivatives more predictably through genetic and metabolic engineering. The product would be primarily marketed to the advanced wound care market for use in advanced care, such as hydrogel-based dressings. This is promising because the advanced wound industry is forecasted to double in size within the next couple years. DeriGen has potential to be marketed in other industries, such as for production of acoustic speaker materials. Currently, these industries are working with non-optimal materials which do not have the properties cellulose derivatives have which enable them to hold water, have greater tensile strength, and further fulfill the needs of the target products as specified by their producers.

3rd Place ($1,000)
Impulse Gaming Concepts
Michael Fricke, Adam Resnick and Alex Weise, mechanical engineering majors
Tyler Mrowiec, architectural engineering and business management double major
Hannah Schermerhorn, electrical engineering and technical communication double major

    Impulse Gaming Concepts was created around the idea of innovation in the billiards and arcade gaming industries. In recent years, these industries have remained static—no new game ideas or innovative designs have broken through to mainstream culture. Impulse Gaming Concepts’ first commercial product, Tandem Pinball, utilizes elements of creativity, interaction between players, physical skill, and strategic thinking to create a fun and uniquely challenging game experience. The layout of the obstacles within the sloped playing field has the unique ability to easily be customized and rearranged by the players to adjust the difficulty and pace of the game. Tandem Pinball’s electronic responses add to its excitement and fun of the game.

4th Place ($500)
Trace Engineering
Brad Meissner, mechanical engineering major
Kevin Grimstad, electrical engineering major
Tyler Hackbarth and Keenan Nemetz, software engineering majors

    Trace Engineering offers engineering from three different disciplines with the purpose of designing and implementing new and innovative solutions for companies. Trace Engineering operates under two main divisions: contractual engineering and new product development. The company was founded to develop a smart textile sensor named the “Area Mat.” The Area Mat is a flexible, formable textile sensor capable of outputting total area and pressure metrics of a force input to the mat. Trace Engineering has filed a provisional patent for the design, and is in the process of filing for a non-provisional patent.

5th place ($250)
Strategic Games Inc.
Adam Van Essen, M.S. in new product management major

    Strategic Games Inc. (SGI) will design, manufacture and sell hybrid mobile application/board games. The current board game market offers little in the way of integrating modern technology into the game experience. Technological integration can allow game tasks such as maintaining point count, banking, record keeping, etc. to be automated or simplified.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 17, 2013

A team of construction management students from Milwaukee School of Engineering took third place in the Preconstruction Services category at the 26th annual Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) Student Competition. Congratulations to the team, which was coached by Dr. Jeong Woo, associate professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department. Team members are: Theodore Bulinski , Minneapolis; Chris Dublinski, Naperville, Ill.; Brett Foster, Lakeville, Minn.; Blake Gleason, New Lenox, Ill.; Bryan Makatura, Pen Argyle, Penn.; and Cate Scholfield, Wausau, Wis.

    Since entering the competition in 1999, MSOE has had 19 top three places in national student competitions and nine national championship teams. No other university in the country has experienced the consistent level of success demonstrated by MSOE.

    MSOE competed against several universities, including Auburn University, Brigham Young University, Colorado State University, Cal Poly, University of Southern California and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

    This year’s preconstruction problem was sponsored by PCL Construction Inc. Students were challenged to prepare a preconstruction proposal for “The Pacific Northwest Project,” a $35-50 million facility in a remote location in eastern Washington State for the local Native American community. The facility is located at the base of a federally operated dam, and consists of a fish hatchery, acclimation ponds upriver of the dam, water supply systems and new housing for hatchery employees.

    The team was required to submit three proposals including Phase I Prequalification, Phase II CM Proposal and Phase III Oral Presentation. These proposals included the construction estimate, schedule, site logistics plan, safety plan, constructability analysis and BIM solutions. PCL Construction judging panelists commented on the great job MSOE students on all evaluation criteria and the high caliber of students from MSOE at the competition.

    Matt Olsen ’11 AECM, and Ben Samolinski and Daniel Voss from Miron Construction mentored the team. Kiewit Power provided financial support which allowed MSOE students to compete in the national competition this year.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 12, 2013

More than 60 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Winter Commencement, Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Kern Center.

    The ceremony will feature a keynote address from MSOE Corporation member Bernard A. Cohen Ph.D., P.E. Dr. Cohen also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree.

    David R. Donehey is the class respondent. Donehey is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. Gerardo Sandoval, who is graduating with honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering, will receive the Alumni Association Award. The award which is given to a student who has made time in his or her hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

About Dr. Cohen:
    Bernard Allan Cohen ’71 is the Founder and President of Neurological Monitoring Associates, LLC (NMA). He graduated from MSOE in 1971 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, and obtained his Ph.D. from Marquette University in 1975. In conjunction with the School of Medicine, his research and dissertations have focused on the analysis of electrical activity of the brain and nervous system using computers. His entire career has been devoted to, and is essentially an extension of, his original research work involving analysis of electrical activity of the brain and nervous system.

    Dr. Cohen has been a member of the faculty of the Emory University Medical School, Medical College of Wisconsin and MSOE. He is currently in private practice focusing exclusively on intraoperative monitoring. He has published more than 100 papers and book chapters, has presented his work at national and international meetings and is a frequently invited speaker nationally and internationally. In addition to his primary practice at more than 25 Wisconsin hospitals with dozens of surgical specialists, he consults with numerous other hospitals, clinics, surgeons and manufacturers throughout the United States, Europe and Israel.

    Dr. Cohen is a long-time supporter of MSOE and has served as a Corporation Member since 2001. He was named an Outstanding Alumnus in 1976, and inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame in 2006. He is a Fellow of both the American Society for Neurophysiological Monitoring and the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society.  He is certified in neurological intraoperative monitoring by the American Board of Registration of Electroencephalographic and Evoked Potential Technologists. He was the first person in Wisconsin to become Board Certified in his specialty.  He is a Licensed Professional Engineer in Wisconsin.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 8, 2013

Construction on the new School of Nursing facilities at MSOE has moved along at an impressive pace! Walls have been painted, ceiling and floor coverings installed, and now the fun begins as furniture, lab and office equipment starts moving over. Here’s a quick look at the start of the move-in.

Originally published February 6, 2013

Guest blog by Megan Syverson, an MSOE nursing student and representative on the School of Nursing planning committee

The simulation rooms are even bigger than I had imagined! Multiple students will be able to work comfortably during simulations, in addition to having an instructor in the room for guidance, and potentially interacting with the family members of SimMan! Also, with cabinets in the room, we can keep all the supplies stocked in the room that we may need for the simulations, which reduces clutter and really opens the room up. It hopefully will make life easier for instructors Jeri Schuster and Kathy Raczynski (and student workers)!  Jeri, Kathy, Assistant Professor Jane Paige and any other professors who might run simulations will also have plenty of room inside the control rooms to manipulate the manikins and monitors. There will be a place to set the patient’s charts right outside the room, just like how many patient beds are set up at the hospitals. Having the environment really simulate what we’ll experience in the clinical setting really enhances our learning as students and helps to optimally prepare us for when we practice on our own.

Another cool feature of two of the simulation rooms is that they have the potential to open up into a big classroom. By folding up the moving wall, the simulation room and classroom can be shared, allowing a simulation to be observed by an entire class. This is a great opportunity because there are many things in nursing that are better learned by watching a patient simulation or a demonstration.

Attached to each of the simulation rooms are break out rooms, which offer a place to debrief about the simulation and learn more from that experience. When not used for clinical or simulations, they can be reserved and used as study rooms by students. These break out rooms can also open up into a small conference room. This might be advantageous for the nursing organizations to have their meetings, or for faculty meetings, small classes or small conferences.

The rest of the nursing department consists of faculty offices along the periphery of the department. The nursing faculty is close enough to reach if we need help, but far enough away for us to enjoy our space in our student lounge area, which I think is optimal for everyone! We’ll try to keep the noise level down, but I’m sure we’ll be busy studying and doing all those papers and projects that are assigned to us anyway!

So that’s the SON lab in a nutshell. Can’t wait until we officially move in on Feb. 7…that day will be here before we know it! It’ll be fun to see how all these spaces are utilized in the near future because all these spaces throughout the Nursing Department are so multifunctional!

Originally published February 5, 2013

Guest blog by Megan Syverson, an MSOE nursing student and representative on the School of Nursing planning committee

There is a home care lab along the back wall of the nursing complex. A few cabinets are set up already so it’ll be interesting to see how that room progresses. Inside the home care lab will be a functional washer and dryer and will resemble a studio apartment. This is helpful for teaching patients how to maintain their homes and participate in their activities of daily living (ADLs) after they come home from the hospital. This room may also be used by other majors, so there’s so many different ways to utilize this space!

Taking a left, you continue on through the department until you see assessment labs on your right, which is where nursing students will begin their clinical experiences as they hone their assessment skills. There’s plenty of room for learning in there! Can’t wait to get these labs all set up and fully functional. It’s going to be great seeing all the students hard at work in all these labs!

Turning 180° from the labs, you’ll notice our nursing station. I like how the flooring and the ceiling both round out to really cue you into this area. The nursing station is really awesome because it allows for a bird’s eye view into each of the simulation rooms through the sweet glass sliding doors! One of the coolest things about these doors is that they can pull out, making it much easier to move beds and other large equipment in and out of the room.

Originally published February 4, 2013

Guest blog by Megan Syverson, an MSOE nursing student and representative on the School of Nursing planning committee

Being part of the planning process of the new School of Nursing labs has been an amazing and unique experience for me. I have been involved in everything from figuring out the best layout of the entire department and picking out color schemes to selecting furniture for the different areas and watching the development. It’s so neat to see how these rooms have transformed from images and drawings on paper to how they are now. Witnessing the progression of this space from right after demolition when everything was stripped to the bottom, to now where whole rooms are starting to come together has been amazing! I feel so lucky to be part of this endeavor because it’s such a momentous change for the MSOE nursing program.

As you enter the nursing department, you can visualize Paula Harrold and student workers greeting you at the front desk, along with all the displays that will be up shortly featuring the history of MSOE School of Nursing, including pictures from Milwaukee County General Hospital School of Nursing, and displays of our new nursing apparel.

Taking a right, you head down the hallway and see a couple HUGE labs. There’s so much space to practice our skills! All we need are the beds, medical equipment, and discussion tables and chairs and we can get to work!

I really like how the flooring cues you into the “clinical” and “non-clinical” areas of the lab. I’m excited for the labs to have designated areas for students to come in and practice skills such as IV insertion, listening to regular and irregular heart and breath sounds, practicing giving injections, the possibilities are endless! Stations could be set up according to student needs, as they express which skills they would like more practice with.

Walking through the hallway, you run into the student lounge, one of the best features of the new nursing department! Currently, nursing students congregate wherever we can find space, and we sometimes get weird looks from all the other students as we discuss various disease processes of our patients. The best part about the new nursing department is that student nurses have a place to call their own! We have a place where we can sit with our nursing peers and discuss all the great stories from clinicals, or talk about all the gory details of anatomy and various disease processes, or just chat about all the upcoming projects and papers we have to get done. This nursing lab is our area now and we have a wonderful space to share with each other!

The space will feature a flat screen TV to practice presentations with, along with multiple bulletin boards that will feature news, information and updates on organizations like Student Nurses Association and Nursing Honor Society, as well as updates and information about clinical and lab schedules. The student nurse space will feature traditional furniture consisting of tables and chairs for doing homework and having discussions, along with soft comfy lounge chairs and bench seating. A printer and lockers are conveniently located near the student nurse space.

Originally published February 4, 2013

Wrestling is a part of Coach Kevin Morin’s DNA. He began wrestling with his brothers when he was in third grade and his oldest brother Keith was a freshman in high school. His brother joined the wrestling team and practiced his moves at home with Kevin and his other brothers, Kenny and Kent. In sixth grade, he began practicing with the 7th and 8th grade team (big brother Keith was one of the coaches and pulled a few strings) and has been involved with the sport ever since.

Morin attended Greenfield High School and was a member of their wrestling team and was a two-time high school All-American. He then earned a scholarship to attend Marquette University and be a part of their wrestling team. Morin excelled on Marquette’s team, winning the National Catholic Tournament two times and placing at the regional competition.

After graduation in 1978, Morin joined the staff at Milwaukee School of Engineering as an admission counselor. MSOE’s wrestling program got off the ground in 1990, and while MSOE was very interested in having Morin as the coach, he now had too many family commitments to take on coaching duties. However, the coach resigned during the 1993-94 season. The athletics staff asked Morin once again if he’d be the team’s coach. He agreed to take over for the rest of the season and help MSOE hire a coach for the following year.

In just half a season with the Raiders, Morin was hooked on coaching. He has been the head wrestling coach ever since and is now in his 20th season with the team. “In my first year of coaching there were four guys on the team,” said Morin. “I called them the Faithful Four because they were so dedicated.”

Morin’s favorite part of coaching is seeing the guys develop. “The difference between high school wrestling and collegiate wrestling is significant. College wrestlers comprise the top 25% of high school wrestlers. It’s always fun seeing the guys come in after successful high school careers and realizing that every match will be tough because their opponents are so good at the collegiate level.”

Some of the highlights that stand out in Morin’s memory include beating arch rival Concordia University in a dual meet for the first time, and also beating nationally-ranked UW-Oshkosh—at Oshkosh. For most student athletes at MSOE, academics come first and it is no different for the wrestling team. For four years (2002-2005) MSOE received awards for having the highest GPA in the nation among Division III wrestling teams. In three of those years, the team also won the conference championships.

“Having some of my guys qualify for the national tournament was a great accomplishment,” said Morin. “Seven different wrestlers have competed nationally and two of them became NCAA All-Americans. In 2003 and 2004, we had back-to-back All-Americans. When I took over coaching, we worked to simply field a full team and we dreamed of having national qualifiers and All-Americans.

In his 20-year career as the wrestling coach, Morin’s dedication has paid off. During the season he works 70-85 hours per week as both MSOE’s director of human resources and as the head wrestling coach. That dedication has led his teams to six conference championships, and in 2012-13 Morin and the wrestling program reached a milestone: 100 dual meet wins.

“I enjoy seeing my wrestlers be successful and how the sport has helped them make it through college. Wrestling was their reprieve,” said Morin.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 31, 2013

Dr. Jeffrey Blessing, professor and director of MSOE’s management information systems program, received the 2012 KEEN Excellence Award for outstanding contributions by an individual to the Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network (KEEN). Dr. Blessing was chosen from among 300 faculty members at 20 KEEN universities across the U.S. The award was announced Jan. 4 at the annual KEEN conference held in Phoenix. He was recognized for his work to set up and run a computer network for collaboration within KEEN.

MSOE is focused on developing students’ entrepreneurial skills. The university’s Center for Entrepreneurship advances creativity, innovation and entrepreneurialism to develop success in all fields and disciplines. Courses on entrepreneurship, including financing the business venture and writing a business plan, are offered through the MSOE Rader School of Business. MSOE received a grant from the Kern Family Foundation to help build a spirit of entrepreneurship among students, faculty and alumni. The KEEN grant, MSOE’s Center for Entrepreneurship and the Rader School of Business provide resources to launch businesses, create new products and turn innovation into success.

KEEN is a consortium of 20 universities around the U.S. that strive to instill an entrepreneurial mindset in undergraduate engineering and technology students. Its mission is to graduate engineers who will contribute to business success; and in doing so, transform the American workforce.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 30, 2013

Imagine living in a village without a reliable source for fresh water, or living in a remote village without access to food or health care during the rainy season. In the U.S., what we struggle to imagine is what many people in Guatemala face every day. MSOE’s Engineers Without Borders is a student organization that aims to improve the quality of life of those in underprivileged areas by implementing economical and sustainable engineering projects.

“EWB is a great organization for people who are looking to serve others with the technical abilities they learn in school,” said Marly Trier, an MSOE sophomore who is double majoring in architectural engineering and construction management. “I love being a part of this organization because I am surrounded by other like-minded people who genuinely want to help improve others’ lives. The projects we work on are in Guatemala, so it’s nice to able to practice my Spanish language skills as well.”

EWB-MSOE members are busy preparing for trips to Guatemala the last week of February. One group will travel to Chortiz to build protective enclosures around the shallow wells providing most of Chortiz’s potable water, and construct a tank and lavadero to minimize losses from overflow and inefficient use. They’ll ensure that the village council develops its own protocol for fair distribution of water in dry months. Dr. Willie Gonwa, assistant professor, and a professional engineering mentor will travel with the students and oversee their work, which came as the result of previous trips to the area.

“Designing and implementing water systems is a way I can serve others with the skills I am acquiring as a student at MSOE,” said Alli Zimont, biomolecular engineering junior. “My experience with EWB has motivated my school work more than I had anticipated

A second group will travel with Dr. Doug Stahl, professor, and two Milwaukee professional engineer mentors. Their mission is to build a bridge in the Mayan village of Muculinquiaj that will link the village to the regional road system and the town of Joyabaj. The existing road is impassable when a small river rises during the rainy season, leaving residents without reliable access to marketplaces, health care and schools.

“I am most looking forward to working together with the local workers to construct this bridge that will greatly improve their access to the city, health care, school and other necessities,” said Trier. “While the main reason we work on these projects is to serve others by providing engineering solutions to real-world problems, I think us students get more back from them in return than what we could ever give.”

In 2012 Trier and other students from EWB-MSOE visited the site to conduct final surveys and evaluation, and the students spent the past year completing their design. Their trip in February will focus on excavating bedrock and constructing the bridge abutments. A third group of students will return to Muculinquiaj in late March with Dr. Todd Davis, assistant professor, to finish the reinforced concrete vehicular bridge.

Originally published January 30, 2013

We are down to the finishing touches in the new nursing center. This week we’re doing some touch-up painting, installing baseboards and putting some IT infrastructure into place. The home care lab is being painted, and furniture is being moved in! All of our computers, monitor screens, appliances and medical equipment are here and ready for staging.

We’re busy packing up books, taking down pictures and display cases, and getting ready for moving day (Feb. 7). We’re also scheduling training for faculty on the conference doors, AV equipment, nurse call, and new simulation mannequins.

Walking through the space, you can really see the community we have created.  The student lounge area is spacious and inviting.  The Student Nurses Association and Honor Society officers will have ample storage space; students can practice presentations on the oversized monitor screen and students will be able to reserve conference space for study groups.

Mr. Mose (our high fidelity mannequin) is also getting ready for his transport to the new facility. Professors Paige and Corso are working with Bell Ambulance to transfer Mr. Mose as part of a lab simulation with the senior nursing students. Stay tuned for more information about this.

Originally published January 2013

MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student chapter is one of four finalists in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition. Twenty-five universities from across the nation submitted entries. Teams had to submit proposals on a project involving the installation of the HVAC and plumbing systems in the Space Exploration Center Building at the NASA Research Park in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Bidders were also encouraged to propose design features that exceed LEED Platinum requirements and a post-construction service component.

MSOE’s team will travel to San Antonio in March to present their proposals at MCAA’s national convention. They will compete against Northeastern University, Southern Polytechnic State University, and University of Washington.

David Taylor (MCAA student president), Brittany Campos (MCAA student vice president), Julie Burg, Matt Brophy, Mitch Cooper, Jason Jacobson and Brittany Leis will give a 15-minute presentation and answer questions in front of a panel of mechanical contractors and conference attendees. Several other students worked on the proposal and will attend the conference and competition as alternates: Haily Fernald, MaryBeth Groth, Nick Lehman, Tyler Mrowiec and Marly Trier. Blake Wentz, assistant professor and construction management program director in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 13, 2013

For me, January has always been the toughest month; it’s dark, cold and seems way too long. This year, with the new nursing space construction, January feels so much better. The space looks amazing. In the two weeks since break, so much has been done: painting, all the flooring, the curves in the ceiling, countertops, doors and windows are all in. The home care lab is the only lab still under construction. Last week we made decisions on the programming of the nurse call system.

I’ve given tours to a couple small groups and I’m still struck by the spaciousness and the work flow we’ve created for students, faculty and guests. Some of the furniture is here and the remainder is scheduled for delivery. Department faculty and staff are moving in Feb. 7. We’ve all started to purge and pack. Students are helping this week to pack up the supplies in the lab cabinet. Mark your calendars for our grand opening celebration on May 6, 2013, which is also the first day of Nurses Week.

Originally published January 29, 2013

James Madison Memorial High School won the Wisconsin regional championship in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Science Bowl® for high school students held January 26 at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). The winning team, comprised of Srikar Abidhatla, Brian Luo, Sohil Shah, Thejas Wesley, William Xang and Coach Sowmya Partha, advances to Washington, D.C., to compete against 69 other regional winners at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl® from April 25-29.

Arrowhead High School, of Hartland, Wis., won second place at the event. Team members were Zachary Bednarke, Meridith Johnson, Alex Strange, Maxwell Strange, Griffin Tschurwald and Coach Cheryl Kaiser.

A second team of students from James Madison Memorial High School finished in third place. Kevin Cao, David Ho, Trang Nguyen, Rutvi Shah, Newton Wolfe and Coach Sowmya Partha were on the team.

Twenty teams of high school science and math students from Wisconsin competed. Many of these teams spent months preparing for the National Science Bowl’s regional competition, which features head-to-head competition in a fast-paced question and answer format similar to the popular television game show, “Jeopardy.” The students were quizzed on all science disciplines including biology, chemistry, earth and science, physics and astronomy, as well as math. Most questions are so challenging many scientists would have trouble finding an answer.

The DOE created the National Science Bowl in 1991 to encourage students to excel in mathematics and science and to pursue careers in these fields. More than 225,000 students have participated in the National Science Bowl throughout its history, and it is one of the nation’s largest science competitions.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 15, 2013

Dr. Eric Durant has been named the Young Engineer of the Year by STEM Forward. Durant is an associate professor in Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, and the computer engineering program director.

The STEM Forward Young Engineer of the Year Award is presented annually to an outstanding contributor to the engineering profession from the greater Milwaukee area. Honorees are recognized for their work in raising the visibility of the profession and the region, while also serving as a role model to others who have or may select the engineering profession as a career.

Durant received bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering and computer engineering from MSOE in 1998. He continued his education at the University of Michigan, where he earned an M.S.E. in electrical engineering in 1999, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 2002. In 2011, he completed an executive M.B.A. from UW-Milwaukee.

Durant joined the MSOE faculty in 2002. He teaches courses in software development and design, digital logic, embedded systems software, computer and software architecture, operating systems, computer graphics and more.

In addition to teaching at MSOE, Durant is a Senior DSP Research Engineer II at Starkey Laboratories Inc. He is on sabbatical for the 2012-13 academic year, and is conducting digital signal processing (DSP) research for hearing aids at Starkey.

A respected expert, Durant frequently gives presentations at conferences and has published a number of papers. He is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). He has given presentations at the International Hearing Aid Research Conference and the Best Assessment Processes Symposium, hosted by ABET, the recognized accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology. ABET is among the most respected accreditation organizations in the United States.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 15, 2013

A group of MSOE students and faculty from Alverno College recently traveled to Africa to set up a computer lab for students at St. Joseph Comprehensive High School in Mambu, Bafut, Cameroon. The initiative was spearheaded by Project Community Computers, an organization headed by Jeff Hanson, electrical engineering and computer engineering senior at MSOE. The used laptops, which otherwise would have been recycled, were donated by MSOE’s Information Technology Department and loaded with a free, open-source operating system.

For the students at St. Joseph’s, the computers will provide a valuable link to information and a brighter future. “They will use the computers for both research and for the Internet,” said Keenan Quick, management information systems senior. “Many of the universities in Cameroon require online applications, so the computers will help them find and apply to universities.  It will also help them secure good jobs after graduation.

For Sharyn Warren, institutional research manager at MSOE and staff representative who was part of the group, the highlight of the trip “was to see the appreciation and the celebration enjoyed by all the people at St. Joseph’s, as well as the nuns at the convent who now have access to technology. The teachers are now able to incorporate technology in their studies, and students are able to use the Internet and the laptops to type papers, do research and learn more about social networking.”

The trip was supported in part by MSOE’s Office of Servant-Leadership. The volunteers transported the computers, flash drives, keyboards, mice, monitors and power cords in their own personal luggage. The school and dormitories are guarded 24 hours a day, and the laboratory is locked behind steel doors whenever a teacher is not present.

Originally published January 14, 2013

Sixty first grade students will be the first to see a new interactive honey bee robot based on “A Busy Bee: The Story of Bella the Honey Bee,” a book recently published by SHARP Literacy. Tim DeLeo, an MSOE electrical engineering student, designed the robot to help children learn and have fun at the same time. The robot will be unveiled Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. at MSOE’s Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway.

SHARP Literacy Inc. and MSOE joined together to develop the interactive robot as a learning tool for children in first through fifth grade who attend schools with the SHARP Literacy curriculum. SHARP students helped create the book for which the robot was built.

The honey bee robot is three feet tall and has a 10.5 inch LCD display screen with an 11 button capacity touch pad. Buttons can be depressed to ask questions, learn about bee parts, learn about the waggle dance and more. The robots antennas and wings move and the rear end shakes which illustrates a bee’s waggle dance. There are also LEDs on the mandibles, pollen basket and stinger. DeLeo collaborated with local sculptor Tom Queoff who donated his time and developed a urethane mold of the bee which produced the translucent exterior or shell. Queoff is an internationally acclaimed sculptor.

DeLeo, an Air Force veteran and electrical engineering student at MSOE, developed the interactive robot as part of an independent study class called Project Management and Servant Leadership. Dr. Leah Newman was his professor. The course blends project management with the tenants of servant leadership. Funding for the robot was provided by the Brady Corporation Foundation Inc., and DeLeo collaborated with Chris Thuss, a project management consultant from Brady Corp. This was one of 23 Brady-funded projects last year at MSOE that promoted servant leadership in project management and benefitted the community. DeLeo’s robot helps children learn and have fun at the same time. The interactive display includes information about a bee’s life, based on the book’s content.

Students who participate in the SHARP Literacy curriculum research different topics. Last year’s theme was honey bees, based on science and the life cycle of growing things. More than 500 students from 15 Milwaukee-area schools submitted writing and drawing samples that were used to develop the 10th book in SHARP’s “Love to Learn” book series titled “A Busy Bee, The Story of Bella the Honey Bee.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 11, 2013

Things are much quieter at the athletic field and parking complex job site. Crews recently completed the pile driving, so we won’t hear the pounding anymore. In total, they drove in 851 piles which added up to 28,072 feet (that’s about 5.32 miles)!

The construction crews are pouring concrete now for the foundation walls and will start putting the precast concrete in place next week. Pictured in the middle of the job site is the “stitch wall” where the parking ramps will come in and out of the structure.

Originally published December 18, 2012

A quick video visit through the new School of Nursing facility to check on the construction progress. Today the sheetrock is going up! Now the rooms are taking shape and the size of the new space becomes more apparent. Construction is moving along quickly.

Originally published January 8, 2013

Following the widely-acclaimed exhibition of David Plowden’s railroad photographs—Requiem for Steam—the artist returns to the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, to present images from his years of work photographing dozens of bridges across the American landscape as part of a Guggenheim fellowship. Bridges: The Spans of North America will be on display from Jan. 18 through April 28.

Many of these engineering marvels no longer exist, except for in the memory and in these captivating works. In Plowden’s words, “there is no more overt, powerful or rational expression of accomplishment—of man’s ability to build.” This exhibition is a tribute to the artist and those expressions of accomplishment.

As part of Milwaukee’s Gallery Night and Day event on Friday, Jan. 18 from 5 to 9 p.m., the museum is hosting a Gallery Talk with Plowden at 7 p.m.

Visitors of all ages are invited to a K’nex bridge building workshop on Saturday, March 16 from noon to 4 p.m. with John and Sylvia Peine. Patrons will be shown how to use their creative and problem-solving skills to build a 48-foot-long suspension bridge using K’nex, and other structures using Lego and Duplo blocks.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Originally published December 20, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering and Fox Valley Technical College announced today the creation of a new 2+2 transfer agreement. Graduates of FVTC’s construction management technology program can more easily pursue a baccalaureate degree in construction management at MSOE, as their associate degree credits will transfer seamlessly to MSOE.

    “Construction management is a strong industry that is going to see continued growth as our economy continues to recover,” said Blake Wentz, MSOE assistant professor and construction management program director. “Our new agreement with Fox Valley Technical College gives students with an associate degree the opportunity to advance their education and make themselves even more attractive to employers. The average starting salary for the 2011-2012 graduates of MSOE’s construction management program was $54,562.”

    “Fox Valley Technical College is excited about adding another chapter to its longstanding partnership with MSOE,” said Rich Cass, instructor in FVTC’s construction management technology program.  “This new agreement gives students from Fox Valley Tech an outstanding pathway to a broader range of career opportunities.  Students can also immediately enter the workforce with an associate degree from FVTC, while continuing their education toward a baccalaureate degree at MSOE.  This roadmap to success is also cost-effective and anchored by great reputations on behalf of both institutions.”

    This new agreement is a win-win for both institutions, and for students. There is a definite advantage for students to continue their education and pursue a bachelor’s degree. Many larger firms will command a 4-year undergraduate degree. A bachelor’s degree enhances the marketability of the graduate with more refined skills in communication and design.

    FVTC already has several transfer agreements in place with MSOE.  Through these agreements, FVTC’s associate degree graduates who meet admission requirements can enter MSOE’s bachelor’s degree completion program in Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) or Management. FVTC students must be graduates of one of the following programs for either the EET or Management pathway through MSOE: Mechanical Design Technology, Accounting, Administrative Assistant, Banking and Financials Services, Business Management, Human Resources, IT-Computer Support Specialist, IT-Network Specialist, IT-Programmer/Analyst, IT-Web Development and Design Specialist, Marketing, Paralegal, or Supervisory Management.

    For more information, contact Marge Rubin, FVTC’s coordinator of articulated programs/credit transfer, at (920) 735-4878; Richard Cass, FVTC construction management technology program director at (920) 232-6018; or Blake Wentz, MSOE assistant professor and construction management program director at (414) 277-2204.

    MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, mathematics, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

    FVTC is Wisconsin’s largest technical college, serving nearly 53,000 people a year. The college offers more than 230 associate degree, technical diploma, certificate programs, and instruction related to 15 apprenticeship trades, in addition to serving as a leader in providing customized training for business and industry. On average, 90% of FVTC graduates are employed within six months of graduation, and the college has nearly 30 programs with 100% graduate placement, based on the 2011 graduating class. FVTC has regional centers, campuses, and specialized training sites throughout its five-county district, with its main campus located in Appleton.

Originally published December 10, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) held a Fluid Power Challenge on Dec. 7 at MSOE. Teams of eighth-grade students competed to solve a fluid power challenge by designing and constructing a mechanism that used fluid power technology. Twenty teams participated, making it the largest competition to date. Participating schools included: Silverbrook Middle School, West Bend, Wis.; Mitchell Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Starbuck Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Steffen Middle School, Mequon, Wis.; Lake Shore Middle School, Mequon, Wis.; and Waukesha STEM Academy, Waukesha, Wis.

Congratulations to all who participated. The winners were:
Overall Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team B, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Portfolio Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Design Champion: Silverbrook Middle School, coached by Keith Miller
Team Work Champion: Silverbrook Middle School, coached by Keith Miller
Team Challenge Champion: Mitchell Middle School Team B, coached by Keith Kohlmann.

At a workshop in November, the students were given the assignment of designing and constructing a fluid power mechanism to perform a defined task. The mechanisms were required to use fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) to pick up weighted objects, and then place them on a platform for various point totals.

After working for four weeks, the teams came together again to compete against each other in a two-minute competition. Engineers from area companies served as judges, who graded the teams and presented awards in five categories-Overall Champion, Design Champion, Teamwork Champion, Portfolio Champion and Team Challenge Champion.     The program is designed to introduce students, and their teachers, to the world of engineering and careers in fluid power. Through the Fluid Power Challenges, the NFPA hopes to encourage students to select more mathematics and science courses in their high school curricula to keep their options open for technology-based post-secondary studies.

MSOE School of Engineering and its Fluid Power Institute™ would like to congratulate all of the students and teachers who were involved in the competition. To learn more about the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge, call (414) 778-3347.

NFPA provides a forum for the fluid power industry’s channel partners-manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, customers and educators. Its 330+ U.S. and multinational members work cooperatively in advancing hydraulic and pneumatic technology through the association’s many programs and initiatives.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published December 5, 2012

The construction crew from Hunzinger is making great progress on the MSOE School of Nursing laboratory suite. The new space is starting to come to life. All of the framing work is done for the labs, classrooms and offices.

Plumbing, electrical, data and HVAC systems have been installed and soon the crews will be putting up drywall!

Check out the video for a “tour.”

Originally published November 30, 2012

MSOE’s Fall Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

 

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business, math-related and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published December 4, 2012

The foundation work for the athletic field and parking complex project is now 65% complete. Crews worked all summer to excavate the site, put in earth retention systems and prepare the site for the building. In total, 65,000 cubic yards of dirt were removed from the site. (That’s 5,500 dump truck loads!)

Pile driving will wrap up next week, and soon the building will come to life. Crews are busy erecting the foundation wall forms, and in just a few days they’ll start pouring concrete for the foundation walls. They’ve already completed a 4-foot concrete foundation around the perimeter.

Toward the end of December, the precast concrete pieces of the structure will be delivered and crews will start setting the pieces in place.

Originally published November 20, 2012

Edward W. Raether, of Waukesha, Wis., delivered the keynote address at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Fall Commencement on Nov. 17. Raether also received an Honorary Doctor of Engineering from the university. He graduated from MSOE in 1968 with a bachelor’s degree in industrial management.

Raether addressed nearly 100 undergraduate and graduate students during the ceremony. “Each of you has an opportunity to make life better for our world, in nursing, in business and in engineering,” he said. “Write your own roadmap and start with the end in mind. Don’t be afraid to ask for direction from people who have traveled a similar career path. Remember that business is about relationships, so develop them effectively.”

“My personal success in my career is largely related to my ‘hands-on’ experience originating from my course work at MSOE and the knowledge, motivation and guidance received from the instructors and professors,” Raether continued. “My foundation in engineering and management skills served me well, and I am extremely grateful to MSOE. I believe that all of you can look forward to a similar experience, but it will require perseverance and hard work.”

About Edward Raether:
Raether earned a degree in industrial management from MSOE in 1968, but that just started his involvement with the university. He served as president of the Alumni Association Board from 1976-77, became an MSOE Corporation member in 1979 and a Regent in 1985. Currently a Regent Emeritus, he has also served on the Regents’ Facilities and Student Life Committees and on the President’s Golf Outing Committee. He was given the Outstanding Alumnus award and inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame in 2006. Raether and his wife Arlene have been long-time supporters of scholarships and other programs at MSOE through annual and lifetime contributions.

In 2008, Raether retired as vice president and managing director from American Appraisal after 40 years of service. Raether began his career in valuation in 1968, after two years in the U.S. Navy, and 10 years with a manufacturer of welding equipment. He assumed management of the Industrial Valuation Division of American Appraisal in 1973. He was elected assistant vice president in 1977 and vice president later that same year. In 1990, Raether relocated to Budapest, Hungary, where he became the deputy managing director of Central/Eastern European Operations and played a key role in starting valuation practices in Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and Germany.

In his 40-year career, Raether managed/carried out valuation projects in 65 countries. With his extensive international skills and fluency in German, he had a reputation of being an effective “client handler” and worked for many major international clients on a repeated basis. “The applications-oriented approach in the MSOE curriculum laid the foundation for my business success,” said Raether. “The engineering and management skills learned at MSOE enabled me to serve thousands of clients with professional valuations.”

Raether’s professional affiliations include past president of Engineers and Scientists of Milwaukee; accredited member of the American Society of Appraisers; current chairperson of the Endowment Committee and member of the Finance Committee and past president of St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, Waukesha, Wis.; and current president of the Lebanon Historical Society, Lebanon, Wis.

Raether and his wife Arlene will celebrate their 55th wedding anniversary in December and have three grown children, Renee, Scott and Jay, and five grandchildren, Alyssa, Jenna and 7-year old triplets Mira, Luke and Vincent.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 26, 2012

Five area universities have been awarded a federal grant to form a statewide University Center that will stimulate commercialization and startups, and support entrepreneurs with a clearinghouse of resources that aid economic growth.

UW-Milwaukee, Marquette University, Milwaukee School of Engineering, UW-Parkside and UW-Whitewater are officially launching the Wisconsin Center for Commercialization Resources (WCCR) with funding from the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) through its University Centers (UC) program.

The announcement takes place Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 10 a.m. in the second-floor Wisconsin Room in the UW-Milwaukee Union, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd. In addition, the event will feature 10 early-stage entrepreneurs – including students, alumni and private citizens – who have used a university service to help them get started. Each will showcase prototypes of their products.

The WCCR grant was the largest in the Midwest and, with matching funds from the five partners, the grant totals more than $2 million. Unique in its collaborative format, the WCCR offers services to support commercialization of products and technology.

“Because of the WCCR’s collective efforts, we are able to harness the assets of the five major universities in Southeastern Wisconsin to provide a variety of services to faculty, staff, students, entrepreneurs, and first- and second-stage businesses in the state,” says Director Carmel Ruffolo. “The WCCR can help individuals and groups go from an idea to pre-manufacturing.”

Individually, each university offers a range of services to support entrepreneurs. Examples include the Kohler Center for Entrepreneurship at Marquette, the Rapid Prototyping Center at MSOE, the Collegiate Entrepreneurs’ Organization (CEO) at UW-Whitewater, the Student Startup Challenge at UW-Milwaukee, and Small Business Development Centers at UW-Milwaukee, UW-Whitewater and UW-Parkside.

To gauge the needs of entrepreneurs, the WCCR begins with a survey that visitors to the Web portal fill out at www.wi-wccr.org. This tells service providers where in the process each entrepreneur’s intervention needs to begin.

Adding to the complement of services are the WCCR nonacademic partners, BizStarts Milwaukee, the Milwaukee Water Council, Wisconsin Energy Research Consortium (WERC), the Milwaukee 7 and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).

Originally published November 13, 2012

The MSOE men’s basketball team will host the fifth All-Engineers Classic Saturday, Nov. 17 and Sunday, Nov. 18 at the Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway. The tournament will feature four of the nation’s most prominent engineering and technological institutions underneath one roof.

In addition to MSOE, other Division III opponents include Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology of Terre Haute, Ind.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) of Troy, N.Y.; and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) of Pasadena, Calif.

The tournament will begin at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 when Rose-Hulman takes on RPI. MSOE and Caltech will battle at 6 p.m. The consolation game will be played Sunday, Nov. 18 at 1 p.m., and the championship game will be at 3 p.m. While all four schools are well known for their academic reputation, they all have well established athletic programs at the Division III level.

Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students. Tickets may be purchased one hour before each game at the MSOE Kern Center Ticket Office. For more information, contact the MSOE Athletic Office at 414-277-4552.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 19, 2012

High school students and their parents are invited to MSOE’s Open House on Saturday, Dec. 15, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. They’ll experience first-hand the warm atmosphere and high-tech learning offered by the university. During the Open House, attendees can:

  • Tour the sophisticated labs where students get the ‘application of theory’ experience that makes them worth so much when they graduate.
  • Learn about some of the great activities students take part in, such as intramural sports, orchestra, servant leadership, professional organizations, student government and gaming.
  • Meet faculty and speak one-on-one with a counselor.

To register for the Open House, please call (800) 332-6763, email explore@msoe.edu, or Schedule a Campus Visit.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 7, 2012

MSOE will offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Actuarial Science and a Bachelor of Science degree in Operations Research in Fall 2013. These degrees will be offered by MSOE’s Mathematics Department.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2010-2020, employment for actuaries is predicted to increase by 27 percent and employment for operations research analysts is predicted to grow by 15 percent.

“At MSOE we continuously evaluate industry needs and offer degree programs to meet the demands of employers,” said Dr. Fred Berry, vice president of academics. “Given the outlook presented by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and our strong ability to offer degrees rooted in business and engineering, it is a natural step for MSOE to offer degrees in actuarial science and operations research.”

“Actuarial science is consistently rated as one of the best jobs in the United States,” said Dr. Yvonne Yaz, the MSOE mathematics professor who developed these degree programs. “We are excited to be offering these programs, and are proud to be the only university in Wisconsin to offer a bachelor’s degree in operations research.”

Actuaries are professionals who find ways to manage risk, evaluate the likelihood of future events and reduce the likelihood and impact of undesirable events. Many work for the insurance industry to calculate costs and determine premiums for policy holders. Others design pension and benefit plans; evaluate assets and liabilities; and help the government manage its programs and ensure compliance with regulatory laws. Actuaries also work for colleges, universities, banks, investment firms, public accounting firms, labor unions and rating bureaus.

Operations research is the mathematical discipline devoted to the study of complex systems through the creation and analysis of mathematical models. Operation research analysts use simulation (which gives them the ability to try out approaches and test the ideas); optimization (which narrows the choices to the best); and probability and statistics (which helps them measure risk, test conclusions and make reliable forecast) in a number of industries, including insurance, government and transportation.

Courses will focus on applied mathematics, mathematical modeling, general computer programming skills, economics, accounting, finance, ethics and business. These degrees prepare graduates for careers and graduate degree programs in actuarial science and operations research. For more information, visit www.msoe.edu/math.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 6, 2012

Nearly 100 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Winter Commencement, which will be at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from MSOE Regent Emeritus Edward W. Raether ’68. Raether also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree.

James Franke is the class respondent. Franke is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. Hannah DiPalomares will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering and the Alumni Association Award. The award which is given to a student who has made time in his or her hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

About Edward Raether:

  Raether earned a degree in industrial management from MSOE in 1968, but that just started his involvement with the university. He served as president of the Alumni Association Board from 1976-77, became an MSOE Corporation member in 1979 and a Regent in 1985. Currently a Regent Emeritus, he has also served on the Regents’ Facilities and Student Life Committees and on the President’s Golf Outing Committee. He was given the Outstanding Alumnus award and inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame in 2006. Raether and his wife Arlene have been long-time supporters of scholarships and other programs at MSOE through annual and lifetime contributions.

In 2008, Raether retired as vice president and managing director from American Appraisal after 40 years of service. Raether began his career in valuation in 1968, after two years in the U.S. Navy, and 10 years with a manufacturer of welding equipment. He assumed management of the Industrial Valuation Division of American Appraisal in 1973. He was elected assistant vice president in 1977 and vice president later that same year. In 1990, Raether relocated to Budapest, Hungary, where he became the deputy managing director of Central/Eastern European Operations and played a key role in starting valuation practices in Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and Germany.

In his 40-year career, Raether managed/carried out valuation projects in 65 countries. With his extensive international skills and fluency in German, he had a reputation of being an effective “client handler” and worked for many major international clients on a repeated basis. “The applications-oriented approach in the MSOE curriculum laid the foundation for my business success,” said Raether. “The engineering and management skills learned at MSOE enabled me to serve thousands of clients with professional valuations.”

Raether’s professional affiliations include past president of Engineers and Scientists of Milwaukee; accredited member of the American Society of Appraisers; current chairperson of the Endowment Committee and member of the Finance Committee and past president of St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, Waukesha, Wis.; and current president of the Lebanon Historical Society, Lebanon, Wis.

  Raether and his wife Arlene will celebrate their 55th wedding anniversary in December and have three grown children, Renee, Scott and Jay, and five grandchildren, Alyssa, Jenna and 7-year old triplets Mira, Luke and Vincent.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 5, 2012

Business leaders from the Midwest will converge at MSOE for the Czech-American Business/Technology Conference on Tuesday, Nov. 13 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

More than 20 Czech companies looking to explore American business partnerships will be showcased at the conference. The companies represent a broad range of industries, including ICT services, industrial automation and logistics, biomedical devices and software, research development, technology, innovation and business accelerators.

“Our conference is a great opportunity for business leaders to learn about doing business in the Czech Republic and in the U.S.,” said Dr. Steven Bialek, chair of MSOE’s Rader School of Business. “The convergence of global business leaders will help to catalyze economic development in both countries.”

The event is designed to promote and expand business and technology development opportunities between the Czech Republic and the United States business entities. Through sharing of actual experiences and examples, the participants will gain valuable insight on how to leverage their business and profit potential.

Czech-American Business/Technology Day Conference is being sponsored and organized by HSP Inc.; Milwaukee World Trade Association; MSOE Rader School of Business; Czech Technical University; CzechInvest Investment and Business Development Agency; Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic; and Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic.

The conference is open to the public. There is a $25 registration fee. For more information and to register for the conference visit: http://www.mmac.org/events/ Contact Dr. Bialek at 414-277-7279 or rsob@msoe.edu with questions.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 2, 2012

MSOE offers free email service to its alumni. The university is upgrading alumni email accounts to Google. Features include extra storage space, access to Google Drive, and single login if you have other Google accounts. Hundreds of alumni have already moved their accounts over and found it easy to set up! If you are an alumnus and don’t have an MSOE email account, you may also sign up for a new (free!) address.

Benefits include:
  • An email address showing your affiliation with MSOE (@alumni.msoe.edu)
  • Increased mailbox size to 25GB
  • Access to Google Drive with Docs, Google Talk and Google Calendar
  • All data is automatically backed up on Google’s servers
  • Alumni may link existing Gmail accounts to their new account and login in with one password
  • Google guarantees 99.9% uptime
  • Access, edit and share emails, documents and calendars from anywhere, on almost any mobile device
  • Emails from your old MSOE account may be forwarded to your new account
To upgrade your alumni email, simply visit this website and follow the three easy steps: https://gapps.msoe.edu/alumni/docs/

 

All alumni must upgrade their @msoe.edu email address by Feb. 1, 2013. Any alumni email address not updated by Feb. 1, 2013 will be deleted. Your email address will change to Your.Name@alumni.msoe.edu. This change does not affect current students (graduate and undergraduate), current faculty or current staff. Alumni do not need an existing @msoe.edu to sign up for the new account.

For any questions, please call MSOE’s Help Desk at (414) 277-7288.

Originally published October 17, 2012

MSOE was one of only three universities to advance to the final round of the National Design-Build Student Competition, sponsored by the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA). Congratulations to team members (pictured, left to right): Blake Gleason, Meghan Scanlan, Matthew Graziano and Evan Crayford. Associate professor Robert O. Lemke is their faculty advisor.

The three teams that will move on to the final phase of the competition are Milwaukee School of Engineering’s “Atlas Design & Construction,” Washington State University’s “Northwest Affinity Constructors” and Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo’s “IS&D.”

  The winners were selected from nine teams that emerged as frontrunners at the regional level. The other teams were “Foresight Building” of Arizona of State University, “Cal Summit” of California State University, Chico, “DB Performance Partners” of University of Missouri, Kansas City, “Paulson Pittman Group” of Georgia Southern University, “Colorado Builders” of Colorado State University and “iBuild” of Penn State University.

DBIA is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals. Unlike other student competitions, DBIA’s design-build competition is designed to mirror best practices in design-build procurement by breaking the competition into a two-phase best value process in which the regional and national jury serves as the owner’s project team.

Phase 1, the request for qualifications phase, was conducted in late September when a general project description was issued for a hypothetical Performing Arts Center on a college campus in the United States. Teams of four students were required to provide their qualifications as well as a broad-based response to the statement, outlining their approach to meeting the owner’s goals which included performance and office spaces, screening rooms, lecture areas and classrooms and an aesthetic that, incorporates the historical, cultural and architecture of the college and community. Regional judges reviewed the submissions and moved the most responsive teams forward to the national competition. Following DBIA best practices, the National Design-Build Student Competition jury shortlisted just the three teams above to respond to the request for proposals (RFP).

  Phase 2 began Oct. 15 when Atlas Design & Construction, Northwest Affinity Constructors and IS&D received the complete RFP from the national jury. These three shortlisted teams will have just one week to respond in full to the RFP. The teams will present their complete packages in person to the National Jury on Nov. 8. This 45-minute oral presentation/interview sessions will take place during the 2012 Design-Build Conference and Expo in New Orleans. Composed of DBIA members, the following distinguished design and construction professionals are serving on the 2012 Design-Build Student Competition Jury: Dennis Ray Ashley, chair, preconstruction manager, Swinerton Builders, Denver; Patrick Crosby, SE, LEED AP, DBIA, president, Crosby Group, San Mateo, Calif.; Greg Gidez, DBIA, AIA, LEED AP, corporate design manager, Hensel Phelps Construction Co., Greeley, Colo.; Everette L. Herndon, Jr., P.E., DBIA, building construction management engineer, City of Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach, Va.; Jim Pattee, DBIA, vice president, electrical systems, M.C. Dean, Inc., Dulles, Va.; and Janet White, FAIA, Janet White Consulting,Washington, D.C.

DBIA Executive Director Lisa Washington, CAE, expressed appreciation to all of the student teams participating in the competition, noting, “DBIA’s goal is to familiarize future design-builders with best practices in design-build project delivery. Whether they work as practitioners in design and construction firms or lend their talents and training to owner agencies, these students will carry forward the best practices that achieve integration and create high expectations of project teams. These proven means and methods are at the heart of what DBIA calls ‘design build done right.’”

About DBIA

Established in 1993, the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA) is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build project delivery. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals. Learn more about design-build, and DBIA’s certification and other programs at www.DBIA.org.

About MSOE

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published October 22, 2012

Since it was founded in 1903, MSOE has benefitted from the advice  and support of volunteer leaders. Meaningful involvement is the most accurate  way to describe the manner in which MSOE’s Board of Regents and Corporation  members assume their responsibilities. Comprised of representatives of business,  industry, government and education, the Board of Regents governs the operations  and the future planning of the university. This fall, MSOE welcomed two  new Regents to the Board and three new Corporation members.

Adams_Todd_Rexnord.jpgTodd A. Adams has been the president and CEO of Rexnord Corporation  since 2009. Adams joined the company in 2004 as vice president, treasurer and  controller; and served as senior vice president and chief financial officer from  April 2008 to September 2009 and as president of the water management platform  in 2009. Prior to joining Rexnord, Adams held various positions at The Boeing  Company, APW Ltd., Applied Power Inc. (currently Actuant Corporation), and RBS  Global Inc. He is a Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science  in Finance from Eastern Illinois University.

 

Tabat_Dawn.jpgDawn Tabat is the chief operating officer of Generac Power  Systems, a position she has held since 2002. Tabat joined Generac in 1972 and  served as personnel manager and personnel director before being promoted to vice  president of human resources in 1992. During this period, Tabat was responsible  for creating the human resource function within Generac, including recruiting,  compensation, training and workforce relations. In her current position, Tabat  oversees manufacturing, logistics, global supply chain, quality, safety and  information services. She also serves as a member of The Kern Family Foundation  Board of Directors.

 

New Corporation members:

  • Matt Alagna ’91, ‘02, CEO-North America, Thomas Magnete USA LLC,  Brookfield, Wis.
  • Thomas J. Riordan, president and CEO, Neenah Enterprises Inc.,  Neenah, Wis.
  • Matthew Teuteberg, president, Teuteberg Inc., Milwaukee

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students.  MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering,  engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related  engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a  national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry;  dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates;  and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university  according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically  experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published October 17, 2012

Construction has begun on the MSOE School of Nursing laboratory suite. The new labs are being built on the first floor of the Student Life and Campus Center, in what was known as “CC130.” So far, the carpeting, drywall and dropped ceiling have been removed. Crews will soon begin work on the mechanical systems for the space.

Originally published October 16, 2012

Friday, Oct. 19, 5-9 p.m.

  The Grohmann Museum will be open for Milwaukee’s Gallery Night and Joe Rondinelli, lead designer at Rexnord, will present the Grohmann Museum with a gift from Rexnord of a 1918 drawing of the Falk facility at 6:30 p.m. The evening also will feature a gallery talk with Dr. Eckhart Grohmann, MSOE Regent.

  “The Falk Company” is an ink and gouache drawing done by F. Otto Becker (1854-1945) in 1918. The original drawing was likely a piece used for lithographic reproduction. Becker is known primarily for his paintings from which prints were made, especially one titled “Custer’s Last Stand,” 1895.More than a million copies were made and distributed in an advertising campaign by Anheuser-Busch Brewery. Becker was born in Dresden, Germany, and arrived in the United States in 1873.He worked briefly in Boston and St. Louis before settling in Milwaukee.

  The Falk Company has a long history, beginning when Herman Falk, who had an interest in mechanics, decided to start his own business and began producing wagon axles. Falk began working with electric street railways in 1888 and developed a portable cast welding machine on wheels that would earn his share of work in the rail industry. His invention helped him incorporate the Falk Manufacturing Company on May 23, 1895. Falk broadened his work by opening gear shops. The brand eventually expanded worldwide and became part of the Rexnord family in 2005.

  “The Falk Company” is the third gift the Grohmann Museum has received from local industry. The first was a 1930s five-piece gouache set from Rexnord, and the second was a painting from Modern Equipment Co. The Grohmann Museum is home to Man at Work, the world’s largest art collection dedicated to the evolution of human work. Given the museum’s focus, and MSOE’s longstanding ties to business and industry, the Grohmann Museum is a natural place for companies to gift their historical art pieces.

 

Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 20-21

  The Grohmann Museum continues its fifth anniversary celebration throughout the weekend with free admission and tours. The museum is open Saturdays from Noon to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. Guests are encouraged to visit three floors of galleries where the art collection is displayed, as well as a spectacular rooftop sculpture garden. The Man at Work art collection comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work. In addition to the core collection, the museum also presents special exhibitions. Currently on display are MSOE at Work: Selections from the Campus Archives and Carl Spitzweg’s The Poor Poet, one of the museum’s latest acquisitions.

  The Grohmann Museum is located at MSOE, an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields.

Originally published October 15, 2012

  Manipal International University, Malaysia, and Milwaukee School of Engineering, recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) formalizing a collaboration in human capital development and research. The MoU opens the door for students of both MIU and MSOE to participate in an exchange program and experience life at both campuses.

  “At MIU, we are dedicated to providing our students with global exposure and enriching student-life experience,” said Iskandar Mizal Mahmood, managing director and CEO of MIU. “Through this collaboration with MSOE, our students will not only benefit from the chance to experience a different campus and culture, but also training and employment opportunities through the industry partnerships formed by both universities. These partnerships expand opportunities for graduates.”

  “Today’s global economy demands leaders who are adept at working with colleagues from around the world,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “A great way to develop this skill—and prove it to prospective employers—is by studying abroad.”

  The MoU also stipulates that MIU and MSOE will be exchanging teaching faculty and engaging in joint educational research and laboratory development. Students from Malaysia are expected to begin their studies at MSOE in Fall 2015.

  The signing of this MoU marks the continuation of a long and successful relationship between MSOE and Manipal campuses. Over the past 18 years, about 200 students from Manipal have completed their degrees at MSOE and several MSOE students have studied in Manipal.

  “Our collaboration with the Manipal Group stretches back to 1994, when we entered a MoU with Manipal Institute of Technology in India to share common objectives in educating students for professional careers in engineering and technology, as well as for Technology Development. This partnership with MIU Malaysia expands on the mutual commitment we have with the Manipal Group to enhance research and talent development,” said Viets.

About Manipal International University (MIU)

  MIU is a member of the Manipal Global Education Group, and is a fully-fledged Malaysian university focusing on engineering, life science and business. It offers foundation, degree and post graduate programs. Manipal Group is India’s largest private institute of higher learning. MIU is an innovative, global, multidisciplinary university with nationally accredited foundation, undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Focusing on the disciplines of engineering, life sciences, business and management, the university fosters excellence, a passion for innovation, a sense of civic and social responsibility and the quest for life-long learning.The university currently operates from its temporary campus in Kelana Jaya. Its new 140 acre campus in Nilai will open by the end of 2012. www.miu.edu.my

About Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE)

  MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; an extremely high placement rate of 95%; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

​ 

Originally published October 12, 2012

What is that noise?!

Anyone who lives or works in downtown Milwaukee is, by now, probably familiar with the methodical “thud, thud, thud” echoing through the streets. That’s the sound of the pile driver, driving hollow steel pipes into the ground at up to 58′ deep in some places.

After the pile reaches its proper depth, it’s filled with concrete to provide added structural support. “When we get to a point where it takes 60 hammer strokes to drive the pile one foot, we know we’ve reached the proper depth,” said Will Wright, field superintendent with Hunzinger Construction.

The hammer weighs 6,615 lbs, and each stroke provides an estimated 55,000 foot-pounds of force to the pile. In total, 774 piles will be driven into the ground at the construction site. But don’t worry—the hammering will be done by Thanksgiving.

Originally published October 8, 2012

  Dr. Russ Meier, professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, was awarded the title “International Engineering Educator Honoris Causa” by the International Society for Engineering Education on September 27, 2012 in Villach, Austria. Meier received the award for his outstanding contributions in the field of engineering education and for long time dedicated work as an engineering educator.

At the awards ceremony, Meier was recognized for his quality teaching record, his knowledge of engineering education research and practice, and his dedication to disseminating that knowledge to the international engineering education community through his roles within the IEEE Education Society. Meier is currently the IEEE Education Society Vice President of Conferences. He served six years on the IEEE Education Society Board of Governors and is a member of the IEEE Education Society Strategic Planning Committee. The International Society for Engineering Education (IGIP) is a world leader in training, certifying, and accrediting professors of engineering through a standard curriculum in engineering education pedagogical theory and practice offered at training universities in Europe and South America.

In 2009, Meier was named “Young Engineer of the Year” by Engineers & Scientists of Milwaukee Inc. (now known as STEM Forward. The Young Engineer of the Year Award is presented annually to an outstanding contributor to the engineering profession from the greater Milwaukee area. Honorees are recognized for their work in raising the visibility of the profession and the region, while also serving as a role model to others who have or may select the engineering profession as a career.

His received the Iowa State University Teaching Excellence Award and Warren B. Boast Award for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence, and was the 2009 ASEE/IEEE FIE Conference Ronald J. Schmitz Meritorious Service Award winner.

Meier received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in computer engineering from Iowa State University. His research interests include: evolutionary digital design using genetic algorithms to search the space of design solutions, the design and analysis of circuits generated using rapid prototyping frameworks and heuristics, the exploration of adaptive architectures using field programmable gate arrays, the exploration of parallel computing systems within the networks of field programmable gate arrays, and the design of modern computer architectures. His education research interests focus on embedded systems and the use of computer technology and social media as pedagogical delivery agents.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; an extremely high placement rate of 95%; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published October 7, 2012

The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) has announced that Dr. Jim Mallmann, a professor in MSOE’s Physics and Chemistry Department, will receive the association’s Homer L. Dodge Citation for Distinguished Service during the 2013 Winter Meeting in New Orleans, La.

Mallmann is also the R.D. Peters Professor of Materials Science and director of the Photonics and Applied Optics Center at MSOE. He earned his B.S. and M.S. in physics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His Ph.D. from Marquette University is in materials science.

He has served as Wisconsin Section Representative for many years and has twice served as the president of the Wisconsin Section of AAPT. His service to AAPT has also included the Committee on Apparatus, which runs the Apparatus Competition, chairing the committee in 2002. He has also served as chair of the Committee on Laboratories. A member of AAPT since 1978, he has presented a paper at every summer AAPT meeting since 1981.

Wisconsin activities include the development of a course titled “A Hands-On Introduction to Electronics” that was taken over four semesters by 96 high school and middle school science teachers in southeastern Wisconsin. Funds for those courses were provided by NSF and by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Education Program.

Mallmann co-authored, with Norman C. Harris and Edwin M. Hemmerling, Physics: Principles and Applications and Experiments in Physics with Norman C. Harris which were published in 1990 by McGraw-Hill Companies.

About the Homer L. Dodge Citation for Distinguished Service to AAPT
Established in 1953 and renamed in recognition of AAPT founder Homer L. Dodge in 2012, the Homer L. Dodge Citation for Distinguished Service to AAPT is presented to members in recognition of their exceptional contributions to the association at the national, sectional, or local level.

About AAPT
AAPT is an international organization for physics educators, physicists and industrial scientists and has more than 10,000 members worldwide. Dedicated to enhancing the understanding and appreciation of physics through teaching, AAPT provides awards, publications and programs that encourage teaching practical application of physics principles, support continuing professional development, and reward excellence in physics education. AAPT was founded in 1930 and is headquartered in the American Center for Physics in College Park, Md.

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; an extremely high placement rate of 95%; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published October 5, 2012

Governor Scott Walker visited MSOE on Manufacturing Day, Oct. 5, to present the university and Snap-on Incorporated with proclamations commending both institutions for their contributions to manufacturing in Wisconsin. Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president, and Tom Kassouf, president, Snap-on Tools Group, were on hand to accept the proclamations. Gov. Walker also declared October Manufacturing Month in Wisconsin.

Manufacturing Day
Manufacturing Day has been designed to expand knowledge about and improve general public perception of manufacturing careers and manufacturing’s value to the U.S. economy. Manufacturing Day is for students, parents, educators, media, customers, suppliers and the community at large. Manufacturers across the country will open their doors to visitors who will learn about real career opportunities, training, and resources. In addition, manufacturers will learn about business improvement resources and services delivered through manufacturing extension partnerships. www.mfgday.com

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

About Snap-on
    Snap-on Incorporated is a leading global innovator, manufacturer and marketer of tools, equipment, diagnostics, repair information and systems solutions for professional users performing critical tasks. Products and services include hand and power tools, tool storage, diagnostics software, information and management systems, shop equipment and other solutions for vehicle dealerships and repair centers, as well as customers in industries, including aviation, aerospace, agriculture, construction, government and military, mining, natural resources and power generation. Products and services are sold through the company’s franchisee, company-direct, distributor and Internet channels. Founded in 1920, Snap-on is a $2.9 billion, S&P 500 company headquartered in Kenosha, Wisconsin. www.snapon.com

Originally published October 5, 2012

The annual MSOE Career Fair will take place Thursday, Oct. 11 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway. There are 189 employers expected to attend the fair (a 15 percent increase over last year), which is open to MSOE students and alumni. Employers are looking for seniors, juniors, sophomores and even freshmen to fill internship and employment positions.

“The fall is the busiest time of the year for employers to seek new talent. The registration for this year’s career fair is evidence of that,” said Mary Spencer, MSOE’s director of career services. “MSOE students and graduates are in demand, and employers are coming from across the country to recruit our talent.”

MSOE students come with an educational background that is strongly integrated in theory and applications which employers value. Students spend an average of 600 hours in high-tech, industrial grade labs, gaining real-world experience during their college career. There is no shock value or learning curve for MSOE students – they are able to contribute and start working immediately when they begin their internships and jobs, setting them apart from students at other universities.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; an extremely high placement rate of 95%; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders. www.msoe.edu

Originally published September 27, 2012

The Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, hosts its third annual festival celebrating the activities and ways of work captured in the paintings and bronzes in the museum’s permanent collection. On Saturday, Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., six artisans will demonstrate their craft as the museum and its surroundings become a laboratory for the creation of “Lost Arts.” Regular museum admission applies: $5 adults; $3 students and seniors; Free for children under 12 and MSOE students, faculty, staff and alumni (with I.D.).

Helena Ehlke and the Grohmann Museum Master Painters: painting
The Grohmann Museum Master Painters use Old Masters’ techniques in order to create a sense of real depth in their art.  In contrast to modern photo-realism, the Old Masters focused on creating three-dimensionality on a flat canvas.  “Old Masters’ techniques” generally refers to a method of using indirect or layered painting techniques.  By using the indirect method of painting, oil-painting artists of the past were able to stretch the ability of oil paints to create optical illusions of a three-dimensional world.  The artists will be demonstrating these techniques by showing how artists of the past used layered painting techniques to create their works.

Kate Ehlke: lace making
Kate Ehlke has been a 19th century living-historian specializing in bobbin lace since 2004. She has done extensive research on the history of lace-making, which was a primary industry in Europe in previous centuries. Ehlke will be working on an 18th-century lace pattern from Pomerania (present-day Germany and Poland) and wearing the traditional costume (or tracht) of that region.

Kent Knapp: blacksmith
Kent Knapp began his study of blacksmithing and Milwaukee’s history at the age of 19. His passion for working with iron is matched only by his aptitude for working with it. The delicate leaves and scrolls within the immense strength of his projects are the perfect marriage for functional artistry. Capturing the classic designs or creating new ones in the old traditions, Knapp finds every challenge a new adventure. Knapp will tend to the forge and create unique pieces specifically for the Lost Arts festival.

Cheryl Myers and the MSOE Yarn Engineers: spinning, knitting, crocheting
A self-taught fiber artist, Cheryl Meyers started working with yarns and fibers almost 25 years ago. Along the way she has learned the art of knitting, crocheting and hand-spinning. She has taught knitting and crocheting to hundreds who have crossed her path, and today she still enjoys making all sorts of creations out of both handmade yarns as well as store-bought fibers. Some of her creations include wool needle-felted bears, knit wool felted hats, nuno wool felted items, crocheted baby afghans, shawls and many more handmade items. Meyers also directs a group of MSOE Yarn Engineers in their textile creations.

Bob “Sieg” Siegel and Luke Traver: wooden shoe carvers
Having studied with 12 master carvers in the Netherlands, Bob “Sieg” Siegel is the last master wooden-shoe carver in America. Luckily, he has enlisted two apprentices, one of whom will carve for the Lost Arts festival. Luke Traver hand carves wearable wooden shoes from log sections using three traditional tools: a side ax, block knife and spoon auger.

Mary L. Spencer: glass artist
Like many artists, Many Spencer has dabbled and experimented with a variety of media. She fell in love with glass after being introduced to it by a friend. It was love at first score and snap of the glass. Her work includes home décor or wearable glass art using the traditional (Tiffany) copper-foil method, glass fusing and mosaic. She frequently incorporates copper, brass, and/or silver in the design piece. Much of her work is influenced by African and Asian culture. The joy derived from working with glass is evident in the color, texture and beauty of the final piece.

Frogwater
The Lost Arts festival will feature live music by Milwaukee’s own Frogwater, the acoustic musical pairing of John and Susan Nicholson. Renowned for their musical virtuosity and exuberant live performances, they like to think of themselves as musical ambassadors, and describe their style as “eclectic acoustic peoples’ music.” Their repertoire spans from Celtic to delta blues, classical to pop, with a healthy dose of unique, original material filling out the mix. Their innovative interpretations of traditional tunes span the centuries and the miles and defy categorization.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is located at MSOE, an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields.

Originally published September 28, 2012

Graduates of Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) earn the highest starting salary and have the highest mid-career salary of any college or university in Wisconsin, according to the 2012-2013 PayScale College Salary Report.

PayScale Inc. reported on starting salaries and mid-career salaries for graduates at more than 1,000 colleges and universities nationwide. According to the report, MSOE graduates’ average starting salary is $56,200, and the average mid-career salary is $87,500.

“We are pleased to see that the extra effort our students put into their studies pays off when they enter their professions,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “At MSOE we are very concerned about student debt and it is comforting to recognize that our graduates are in an income position to handle reasonable debt repayment.”

MSOE students gain an average of 600 hours of laboratory experience during their undergraduate careers and are ready to hit the ground running when they graduate. MSOE faculty members are experts in their fields, with an average of seven years of professional experience in addition to teaching experience. Professors incorporate their real-world experience into the curriculum. Employers know that when they hire MSOE alumni, they are getting top-notch talent and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded and technologically experienced.

Originally published September 19, 2012

Outstanding full-time and part-time faculty members recently were honored at MSOE.

Dr. Bass Abushakra, associate professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction ManagementDepartment, received the Karl O. Werwath Engineering Research Award. Karl O. Werwath was an innovator in engineering education and the application of technology, and believed that teaching effectiveness was enhanced through applied research and consulting. He felt that MSOE should make an effort to contribute to the advancement of technical knowledge for the benefit of business and industry for the good of the community and the nation. This award was initiated to recognize the vision of Karl O. Werwath and the contribution of MSOE faculty and staff who have fostered the advancement of applied scientific knowledge. Abushakra was nominated for this award by MSOE faculty and staff members, alumni, Regents and Corporation members. The award recipients are chosen based on criteria including their contribution to engineering, scientific research, consulting, the engineering profession and scholarship, promoting research at MSOE, patentable concepts and publications.

The Falk Engineering Educator Award was presented to Dr. Mohammad Mahinfalah, a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department. The award is given annually to a full-time faculty member with less than seven years experience. It is a testament to exemplary dedication and performance. Mahinfalah received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in engineering mechanics, all from Iowa State University. His areas of specialization are experimental mechanics, composite materials, impact testing and vibrations.

Dr. Debra Smith ’92, a lecturer in the Mechanical Engineering Department, received the Johnson Controls Award, presented to outstanding part-time faculty. The award was inspired by Robert C. Moore, a long-time faculty member in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department. The award recognizes the contributions of part-time faculty to the education, motivation and support of the students at MSOE; encourages and recognizes excellence in teaching, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels; recognizes commitment and assistance to students outside of the classroom; and  recognizes contributions to the improvement of educational programs and the effectiveness of the learning process at MSOE. Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison, a master’s degree in engineering management from MSOE, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Marquette University.

Three members of the faculty were named Professors Emeriti. They are: James Dieball, professor, Physics and Chemistry Department; Professor Tom Labus, Mechanical Engineering Department; and David Tietyen, adjunct professor, Rader School of Business. Dieball and Tietyen will continue to teach as adjunct faculty members at MSOE.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 21, 2012

MSOE will welcome hundreds of visitors to campus this weekend. Prospective students are attending an MSOE Open House, and folks from near and far will tour the Grohmann Museum, Alumni Partnership Center and Kern Center as part of Doors Open Milwaukee.

MSOE Open House
High school students and their parents will tour campus during MSOE’s Open House on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. They’ll experience first-hand the warm atmosphere and high-tech learning offered by the university. During the Open House, attendees can:

  • Tour the sophisticated labs where students get the ‘application of theory’ experience that makes them worth so much when they graduate.
  • Learn about some of the great activities students take part in, such as intramural sports, orchestra, servant leadership, professional organizations, student government and gaming.
    Meet faculty and speak one-on-one with a counselor.

To register for the Open House, please call (800) 332-6763, email explore@msoe.edu, or Schedule a Campus Visit.

Doors Open Milwaukee
    On Saturday and Sunday Sept. 22-23, Doors Open Milwaukee will open the doors to hundreds of wonderful buildings free-of-charge to the public –buildings that hold hidden treasures and special stories – from churches to office buildings, theaters to work sites, museums to hotels, clubs to universities; all sites of historic, architectural, cultural, or commercial interest. MSOE buildings on the tour include the Kern Center, Grohmann Museum and the Alumni Partnership Center. Last year nearly 1,000 people visited MSOE’s buildings, and the campus community is excited to welcome even more visitors this year.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 18, 2012

The construction crew is in the final stages of installing the earth retention system at the athletic field/parking complex site. A layer of rock has been spread throughout the site. Because the base of the building will be so deep into the ground, the rock is needed as a drainage layer. This will ensure water doesn't enter the building once it’s built. At the end of September, the crew will start putting in the footings and foundation for the building.

Originally published September 18, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering has been named a Military Friendly School® by Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning into civilian life. The 2013 Military Friendly Schools® list honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

“Inclusion on the 2013 list of Military Friendly Schools® shows MSOE’s commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students,” said Sean Collins, director for G.I. Jobs and vice president at Victory Media. “As interest in education grows we’re thrilled to provide the military community with transparent, world-class resources to assist in their search for schools,” said Sean.

Visit www.militaryfriendlyschools.com for the complete list of schools on the list, interactive tools and search functionality to help military students find the best school to suit their unique needs and preferences.  The 1,739 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year’s list exhibit leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience. These schools have world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility, and other services to those who served.

Veterans students at MSOE were featured in the Summer 2012 issue of Dimensions magazine, and more information about veteran’s education benefits at MSOE are available online.

Now in its fourth year, the 2013 list of Military Friendly Schools was compiled through extensive research and a data-driven survey of more than 12,000 VA-approved schools nationwide. The survey results that comprise the 2013 list were independently tested by Ernst & Young LLP based upon the weightings and methodology established by Victory Media.

Each year schools taking the survey are held to a higher standard than the previous year via improved methodology, criteria and weightings developed with the assistance of an Academic Advisory Board (AAB) consisting of educators from schools across the country.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 18, 2012

High school students and their parents are invited to MSOE’s Open House on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. They’ll experience first-hand the warm atmosphere and high-tech learning offered by the university. During the Open House, attendees can:

    • Tour the sophisticated labs where students get the ‘application of theory’ experience that makes them worth so much when they graduate.
    • Learn about some of the great activities students take part in, such as intramural sports, orchestra, servant leadership, professional organizations, student government and gaming.
    • Meet faculty and speak one-on-one with a counselor.

To register for the Open House, please call (800) 332-6763, email explore@msoe.edu, or Schedule a Campus Visit.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 12, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering earned the 19th spot on U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 list of Best Universities in the Midwest. MSOE was ranked 14th in the Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs category among engineering schools whose highest degree is a bachelor’s or master’s. In addition, MSOE’s Mechanical Engineering Program was ranked 11th.

About the rankings:
The 2013 rankings by U.S. News provide an examination of how nearly 1,400 accredited four-year schools compare on a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Among the many factors weighed in determining the rankings, the key measures of quality are: peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

MSOE officials noted that while the survey results are very gratifying, results should not be overemphasized by students or their families during the college selection process. Choosing a college is an individual decision that should be made by students and families based on the student’s individual needs. Students come to MSOE because of its focus on laboratory experience and career practice, expert faculty dedicated to student learning, its small college feeling within a vibrant downtown neighborhood, extremely high placement rates for graduates and the success of its alumni.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 12, 2012

Students at Milwaukee School of Engineering now have access to the latest technologies available from Apple. The Gene Carter Apple Technologies Learning Suite was made possible thanks to a generous donation from Dr. Gene P. Carter, MSOE Regent Emeritus and alumnus.

The learning suite has been outfitted with iMac computers, iTouch mobile devices, iPad tablets and Apple TV digital streaming technology. In addition, the classroom layout was redesigned to allow for small group collaboration. The modular concept is intended to capitalize on Apple’s mobile technology and includes global multi-media connections that will allow students and faculty to connect live audio and video to any place in the world.

Carter has supported MSOE’s efforts to provide students with high-tech computer equipment since 1989, when he established the Carter Desktop Media Laboratory. Several renovations and upgrades to the laboratory have occurred since then, and Carter’s most recent contribution brings the total to just over $300,000.

“Gene Carter has led a very successful career at Apple Computer and with his own companies. We are proud to call him an MSOE alumnus,” said Dr. Hermann Viets. “We are grateful for the continued dedication Gene and his wife Patricia have shown to MSOE.”

Students in the technical communications program and MSOE’s Rader School of Business use the new technology in their promotions/advertising and desktop publishing classes. Software engineering students use the space for a mobile programming course featuring Apple’s iOS.

“The renovation of this learning suite will serve as a template for future classroom upgrades in Rosenberg Hall, including the integration of mobile technology, modular teaching and learning space, and digital connections to a world of resources,” said Dr. Steven Bialek, chair of the MSOE Rader School of Business.

About Gene P. Carter
Gene P. Carter earned a degree in electronic communications technology from MSOE in 1960. After graduation, Carter worked for Sandia Corp. as a technical staff assistant until 1966 when he accepted a position with Fairfield Semiconductor.

Carter was vice president of sales and a member of the original Apple Computer Inc. management team from 1977 to 1984. He was responsible for creating the sales and distribution strategy for the company’s growth from zero to $938 million. Carter has worked as a private investor in electronics start-up companies and real estate partnerships since leaving Apple in 1984. He is the co-founder of Productivity Software Inc., Tigan Communications Inc. and Portable Energy Products Inc. Carter, who was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree from MSOE in 1995, lives in Saratoga, Calif., with his wife, Patricia. They have two grown children, Pam and Brian.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 7, 2012

The Grohmann Museum presents MSOE at Work: Selections from the Campus Archives, from Sept. 7 through Dec. 17. The exhibit is the first of several events and exhibits to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway.

msoe_at_work.jpg

Taken in the early 1900s, this photo captured MSOE’s humble beginnings. Here students build storage batteries, which they sold to help cover the cost of tuition.

MSOE at Work highlights and showcases the university throughout its history. Photos, prints and documents capturing the evolution of the university and the work of its students are presented to pay tribute to the impact of the dynamic institution. Also featured will be work documenting the development of the museum itself.

Museum visitors are also encouraged to view a significant addition to the Grohmann Museum’s Man at Work art collection: Carl Spitzweg’s The Poor Poet. Spitzweg was one of Germany’s preeminent 19th century painters. In addition to The Poor Poet, several of Spitzweg’s paintings have been assembled for display, including The Bookworm from the Milwaukee Public Library collection. Carl Spitzweg: The Poor Poet and Other Characters will be on display through Dec. 30.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related engineering fields.

Originally published September 6, 2012

MSOE welcomes the following full-time faculty members:

Dr. Todd Davis, P.E., assistant professor, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
Dr. Davis holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree in structural engineering from University of Florida, and a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Auburn University. He previously taught at University of Florida and has industry experience as staff civil engineer in the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps, and as a director and civil engineer with Engineering Ministries International in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Dr. Eryn Hassemer, assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
Dr. Hassemer earned her Ph.D. in cell biology, molecular biology and genetics from Medical College of Wisconsin, and a bachelor’s degree in human biology from UW-Green Bay. She previously taught part-time at MSOE, and was a graduate research assistant and laboratory technician at Medical College of Wisconsin.

Jonathan Howard ’08, ’10, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Howard graduated from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and a Master of Science degree in perfusion. He is a licensed perfusionist in the State of Wisconsin and board certified by the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. He is active in clinical research, updating protocols and quality control initiatives, and has clinical affiliations at multiple hospitals and medical centers in southeastern Wisconsin.

Dr. Shafagh Jafer, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Dr. Jafer holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering, and a bachelor’s degree in systems and computer engineering, all from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She previously taught at Carleton University and University of Virginia. She was also a research assistant at Carleton University in the Center for Advanced Studies in Visualization, Simulation and Modeling, and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Dr. Anthony Van Groningen, assistant professor, Mathematics Department
Dr. Van Groningen earned his Ph.D. and master’s degree in mathematics, and bachelor’s degree in computer science from UW-Milwaukee. Prior to joining the MSOE faculty, he was an assistant professor and associate chair of the Mathematics Department at University of Wisconsin Barron County.

Dr. Hope Weiss, assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Dr. Weiss holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree in mechanical engineering from University of California-Berkeley, and a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University. She previously taught at University of California-Berkeley and Cornell University. She has industry experience at Sandia National Laboratories.

Dr. Wujie Zhang, assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
Dr. Zhang earned a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at University of South Carolina, a master’s degree in food science from University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, and a bachelor’s degree in food science and engineering from Tongji University in Shanghai, China. He is a postdoctoral researcher in the biomedical engineering department and Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute at Ohio State University, and also conducted research at University of South Carolina and University of Shanghai for Science and Technology.

MSOE also welcomes the following part-time faculty members:
Dr. Omar Abdel-Baqi, adjunct assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Dr. Anne Alexander, adjunct assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
Jill Bolanowski, lecturer, Mathematics Department
Dr. Anthony Bowman, adjunct assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Dr. Jenne Meyer, adjunct assistant professor, Rader School of Business
Tiffany Miner, lecturer, Rader School of Business
Kim Pemble, adjunct assistant professor and interim program director for Master of Science in Medical Informatics, Rader School of Business
Beth Slayman, lecturer, Rader School of Business
J.W. Spear, Sr., P.E., lecturer, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published September 4, 2012

On Sept. 4, 2012, Direct Supply Inc. opened the Direct Supply Technology Center at MSOE. Continuing the company’s 26-year history of offering computer and software technology opportunities for interns and graduates, the Technology Center will house up to 60 Direct Supply computer engineers and technology interns.

Bob Hillis, president and CEO of Direct Supply Inc. and a member of the MSOE Board of Regents, said that the Technology Center “is an important and exciting step in the continued growth of our employee-owned company and an opportunity for our engineering interns and full-time engineers to collaborate more closely with the MSOE faculty and students on new technology and innovation.”

“Milwaukee produces remarkable engineering and IT talent, and we’re proud to open our Technology Center in the heart of the MSOE campus,” said Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer Bill Avery.  “The center will be a key resource for us as we continue to develop and attract top-level IT professionals for our Milwaukee headquarters.”

The Technology Center occupies more than 9,000 square feet in the German-English Academy building on the MSOE campus.

“MSOE and Direct Supply have a long history of working together, and I am pleased to welcome them to our campus,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “There are 57 MSOE alumni who work at Direct Supply, and 15 students who are interning there this year. This move further strengthens our relationship with the company.”

Headquartered in Milwaukee, Direct Supply Inc. is the nation’s leading provider of equipment, eCommerce and service solutions to the senior living profession, serving more than three million seniors. Direct Supply Inc. works for the success of its customers by providing quality products, unmatched response to customer needs and industry advocacy. Learn more at www.directsupply.com.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 95% placement rate; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published August 28, 2012

MSOE student-athlete Carol Cayo (Lake Mills/Lake Mills, Wis.) was chosen as one of the top 30 honorees for the NCAA Woman of the Year award. A 2012 graduate, Cayo was selected from a group of nearly 430 nominees. The top 30 women are composed of 10 honorees from each NCAA division and span various NCAA sports.

Cayo has been honored numerous times throughout her four-year career including most recently the Northern Athletic Conference Woman of the Year award. Cayo, a three-sport student-athlete for the Raiders’ basketball, tennis and outdoor track & field teams, attended Lake Mills High School and graduated from MSOE this spring with a degree in industrial engineering and a 3.98 GPA. She was a two-time selection on the Capital One Academic All-America Team selected by CoSIDA, and led the women’s basketball 2012 First Team as the Division III Academic All-American of the Year. Additionally, Cayo was a three-time Capital One Academic All-District selection and a four-time NAC Scholar-Athlete.

She earned All-NAC First Team honors in women’s tennis this season as the Raiders’ No. 1 singles and doubles player, and received an All-NAC honor all four seasons in basketball including three-straight First Team selections. She was named NAC Freshman of the Year in her rookie campaign, and was named both the NAC Women’s Basketball Player and Defensive Player of the Year this past season, when she became the league’s all-time leader with 1,141 career rebounds.

In addition to being named a WBCA All-American honorable mention this season, Cayo was a finalist for the prestigious Jostens Trophy, an award that honors the most outstanding women’s and men’s Division III basketball players of the year.

“Carol is very deserving of this award,” MSOE head women’s basketball coach and SWA Jessica Ott commented. “She has really exemplified the Division III philosophy with her commitment and success in academics, athletics and all her service projects she has done at MSOE. Carol truly is a student-athlete.”

At MSOE’s spring commencement, Cayo was honored with the Alumni Association Award for Student Achievement as a leader in community, and received the Fred F. Loock Outstanding Student Award — presented annually to the MSOE student who combines an excellent academic record and has demonstrated leadership and professional bearing in extracurricular or community service activities. It is the most prestigious student testimonial MSOE bestows.

In the community, Cayo volunteered at the St. John’s Cathedral Soup Kitchen, Sam’s Hope Book Drive, Our Next Generation program, and was a peer tutor in the MSOE Learning Resource Center. Cayo is a currently a project manager at Epic Systems Corporation in Verona, Wisconsin.

“Carol’s accomplishments and honors at MSOE have been extraordinary,” MSOE Director of Athletics Dan Harris said. “She has represented us with excellence, honor, dignity and intellect. We have been blessed to have her as an MSOE student-athlete.”

The top 30 honorees reflect the pillars of the Woman of the Year award, with outstanding achievements in academics, athletics, community service and leadership.  In September, three finalists will be chosen from each division to form nine finalists for the award. The 2012 Woman of Year will be announced and the top 30 women will be honored during an Oct. 14 ceremony in Indianapolis.

Originally published August 28, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) is one of the best colleges and universities in the Midwest according to The Princeton Review. The New York City-based education services company selected the school as one of 153 institutions it recommends in its “Best in the Midwest” section on its website feature 2013 Best Colleges: Region by Region.

For this project, The Princeton Review asked students to rate their own schools on several issues—from the accessibility of their professors to quality of the campus food—and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students and their campus life.  Comments are included on The Princeton Review site.  About MSOE, students said, “The primary focus is on ‘Producing high quality engineers that are immediately prepared to contribute to the workforce upon graduation.’” To that end, “Most of the professors have been in the industry before teaching, so they understand what employers are looking for.” For many, MSOE’s strong local reputation and “great placement rate after graduation” are irresistible lures. In addition to engineering the students said, “MSOE has a very respected nursing program and business program.”

The 153 colleges that The Princeton Review chose for its “Best in the Midwest” list are located in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The Princeton Review does not rank the colleges in its “2013 Best Colleges: Region by Region” list hierarchically or by region or in various categories. The Princeton Review, headquartered in Framingham, Mass., with editorial offices in New York City and test preparation locations across the country and abroad, is not affiliated with Princeton University and it is not a magazine.

In addition to being named one of the “Best in the Midwest,” MSOE was included in The Princeton Review’s “2013 Fire Safety Rating Honor Roll.” The honor roll honors colleges and universities concerning their on-campus housing fire safety and fire prevention practices and policies. MSOE was the only university in Wisconsin to be named to the Fire Safety Honor Roll. Said Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP/Publisher, “We salute the schools on this Honor Roll for their outstanding fire prevention programs. From installing fire alarm systems and smoke detectors to equipping a high percentage of their dorm rooms with sprinkler systems, these schools have demonstrated an exemplary commitment to safeguarding the lives of their students living in residence halls.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published August 22, 2012

Much like they were back in July, construction crews are still digging. So far they’ve removed approximately 45,000 cubic yards of earth, out of a total 60,000 cubic yards. As they dig they continue to construct the earth retention system with integral erosion control, which prevents the ground from caving in. We Energies has been working on the utility relocation, laying conduits and pulling cables, all of which will provide power to the structure.

Originally published August 17, 2012

Now there are even more reasons to attend MSOE’s School of Nursing: new labs! Construction will begin soon for new nursing labs and classrooms on the first floor of the Student Life and Campus Center. The $3 million, 25,000 square-foot facility is expected to be completed this winter, and will be the new location for the School of Nursing classrooms, labs and faculty offices. Read more in this recent article by The The Business Journal.

Originally published August 15, 2012

Innovation and collaboration inspired MSOE students to spend their summer at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), learning the latest in biotechnology and bioengineering techniques in the Innovation Center’s laboratories. During the ten week program, the college sophomores and juniors got hands-on experience in the laboratory. They used mass spectrometers to peer inside cells and learn the role proteins play in healthy and diseased cells. Students from Marquette University also participated in the program, and worked on designing and developing custom-built laboratory equipment to support research in the Innovation Center.

“This collaboration provides students from Marquette and MSOE with opportunities to gain hands-on experience in the use of cutting edge technology and to develop critical thinking skills in designing their research project. We are happy to host these students as they explore careers in biotechnology. Having them in our labs allows them to see firsthand how complex diseases are studied and research is applied,” said Andrew Greene, Ph.D., Director of the Innovation Center.

Jared P.  Barfknecht, biomedical engineering major, investigated protein-DNA interactions on a genome-wide scale. As part of the Wisconsin Center of Excellence in Genomics Science, GENECAPP (Global ExoNuclease-based Enrichment of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics) was developed as a methodology to analyze the conditional binding of proteins to DNA anywhere in the genome.

Michelle E. Hasse, biomolecular engineering major, worked to develop an in vitro model of heart development (cardiogenesis) that exists outside of a living organism. This tool could be used to study cases of congenital heart disease in which the cause and/or mechanisms of the disease are unknown.

Kirsten Mahuta, biomolecular engineering major, conducted studies to test a novel drug treatment for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which infects 50-80% of adults in the United States. There is currently no vaccine available to prevent infection. The objective of these studies was to inhibit a vital protein necessary for HCMV replication—and then to quantify the changes in cellular gene expression to help understand how the infected cell responds to the treatment.

Rebecca L. Majewski, biomolecular engineering major, studied a unique treatment for diseases that involve problems with blood vessel growth. Treatment is based on the administration of the patients’ own stem cells. This research could potentially impact a broad range of diseases linked to blood vessel growth including obesity, cancer and retinal disease.

Robert J. Nogle, biomolecular engineering major, studied biopsy samples from patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme brain tumors to better understand what proteins are linked to the success or failure of the drug Bevacizumab. Currently, only about 40% of patients who receive Bevacizumab respond to the drug. This research can lead to predicting in advance if a patient will be able to respond to Bevacizumab.

Michael P. Sgarioto, biomolecular engineering major, conducted research focused on the entry of pharmaceuticals into tissue to determine the efficacy of both existing and novel drugs. How a drug acts on the tissue depends on its chemical properties, as well as its transport into the tissue. Transport phenomena are essential to understanding many processes in engineering, physiology, biology, pharmacy and many other areas.

Jordan Wagner, biomolecular engineering major, studied a newly discovered receptor protein called the Mas1 proto-oncogene because of its role in capillary growth. Studies of Mas1 and the proteins it interacts with will help us learn more about the growth of blood vessels, so that others might be better equipped to research and treat diseases involving capillary development.

The Innovation Center is the result of a generous gift to MCW from Dr. Robert D. and Dr. Patricia E. Kern to promote the advancement of biomedical science in Southeastern Wisconsin. The mission of the Center is to nurture a research enterprise at the high school, undergraduate and postdoctoral levels; to promote collaborations across institutions of higher learning in the greater Milwaukee area; to encourage collaboration within MCW through internal research grants, and to invite visiting faculty to present seminars on topics related to the Innovation Center research.

More information about the Innovation Center and the Biotechnology and Bioengineering Center can be found at: www.bbc.mcw.edu

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published August 14, 2012

Traffic is flowing smoothly through downtown Milwaukee again on the roads and down the river, thanks in part to MSOE’s Fluid Power Institute™. Students and staff were involved in the design of the hydraulic systems powering the new vertical lift bridges at Wisconsin Avenue and Juneau Avenue, over the Milwaukee River.

FPI became involved in the project in August 2011 when one of the subcontractors, Dan Krall & Company, needed their assistance testing components for the bridges.

FPI designed the hydraulic system and tested the functionality of the hydraulic assemblies for these bridges. They conducted performance testing on the flow divider/combiners that will be used to split and combine the flow to lift the cylinders on each end of the bridge, as well as pump performance testing for each of the four pump-motor assemblies.

They also conducted functionality testing on the main manifolds and cylinder manifolds to ensure they operated as designed and all valve adjustments were made properly. After testing, the components were shipped directly to the bridge for installation. FPI provided on-site start up assistance, and complete hydraulic system drawing and documentation information (operational and maintenance manuals).

Russ Steinmetz ’91, FPI project engineer, managed the project, while Dave Gerow, P.E., ’81, adjunct associate professor in Mechanical Engineering; was contracted to design and create drawings for the hydraulic cylinders and a structural enclosure to protect the hydraulic power units from the elements. The power units and enclosures are located in the pier structures underneath the bridge.
Four mechanical engineering students also were involved in the project: Max Kubicki, Eric Lovelady and Steve Shaffroth, all FPI undergraduate research assistants, and Dane Jones, FPI senior lab technician.

The Wisconsin Avenue bridge opened Aug. 9, 2012, and work is expected to be complete on the Juneau Avenue bridge in November 2012.

Originally published August 8, 2012

Nine undergraduate students from around the country were selected to participate in Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), an innovative 10-week summer program at MSOE. As part of the REU program, students researched projects advancing state-of-the-art applications in the biomedical, aerospace, manufacturing, composite, biomolecular and fluid power industries.

REU is an innovative, interdisciplinary program funded by the National Science Foundation, MSOE’s Rapid Prototyping Center, MSOE’s Fluid Power Institute™ and the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP) to give undergraduates hands-on experience in research. This program focuses on applications of fluid power and rapid prototyping technology.

Hands-on access to solid freeform fabrication devices and fluid power laboratories, close partnerships with advisors, industry mentors and other educational institutions, paired with a creative learning environment provided students with a high probability of success in research focused on solving industrial problems through advanced manufacturing technology.

Students conducted research, took field trips to visit professionals and problem solved with advisors from the MSOE faculty, teammates and other resources. They participated in poster sessions, group discussions, research documentation, learned new software, attended Rapid Prototyping Consortium and Fluid Power Institute meetings, made presentations, built models, designed and completed experiments and wrote research papers.

Participants
Maya Bates, Milwaukee School of Engineering, biomolecular engineering major
Hometown: Milwaukee
Project: Three-Dimensional Mammalian Cell Culture Using Hydrogel Filled Scaffold
Advisor: Dr. Vipin Paliwal, associate professor, Physics and Chemistry Department

Laura Biersteker, Vanderbilt University, biomedical engineering major
Hometown: Grayslake, Ill.
Project: Creation of Patient-Specific Bone Densitrometry Models from 3D Imaging Data
Advisor: Dr. Jeff LaMack, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department

Tyler Capek, UW-River Falls, math and physics major
Hometown: Gilman, Wis.
Project: Modeling the Human Brain’s Major Structures and White Matter Connectivity Using Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Advisor: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, Mechanical Engineering Department

Marissa Castoro, Hofstra University, mechanical engineering major
Hometown: Beechhurst, N.Y.
Project: Impact of Laser Power on the Mechanical Properties of Selectively Laser Sintered Parts
Advisor: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, Mechanical Engineering Department

Paul Hausch, Ripon College, science, math and art major
Hometown: Madison, Wis.
Project: Creation of a Physical 3D **** Sapiens Single-Cell Model Using Confocal Microscopy Data via Rapid Prototyping
Advisor: Dr. Vipin Paliwal, associate professor, Physics and Chemistry Department

Courtney Kodweis, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, biomedical engineering major
Hometown: Hilton, N.Y.
Project: Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Pediatric Airway
Advisor: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, Mechanical Engineering Department

Khaled Mougharbel, University of South Florida, electrical engineering major
Hometown: Tampa, Fla.
Project: Creation of a Flow-Through Replica of a Diseased Arterial Segment for Recreating Realistic Hemodynamic Environment
Advisor: Dr. Jeff LaMack, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department

Chris Stovall, Illinois Institute of Technology, aerospace engineering major
Hometown: Chicago
Project: An Experimental Investigation of Aeration in Hydraulic Sensors
Advisor: Paul Michael, research chemist, Fluid Power Institute™

Men Young, Florida International University, mechanical engineering major
Hometown: Miami, Fla.
Project: Applications of Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting for use in Fluid Power Systems
Advisor: Doug Cook, research engineer, Rapid Prototyping Center

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published August 7, 2012

Social media is widely used in marketing, advertising, customer service and customer awareness, but is there a place for it in engineering, business and technical professions?

The answer is yes, and Milwaukee School of Engineering is now offering a Social Media for Business certificate that will teach participants how to use social media to benefit themselves and their company’s bottom line. Visit http://socialmediacertificate.msoe.edu/ to learn more and register for courses, which begin in September.

There is a recognized need for social media education. Less than 15 percent of manufacturing firms report that they are well-prepared or very well-prepared to use social media to the advantage of their firms, according to a recent survey by the Midwest University Consortium for Advanced Manufacturing, which includes MSOE.

MSOE has established itself as a local leader in social media with the launch of its online social community for admissions, which was developed in conjunction with 7Summits, a Milwaukee-based social business agency. The award-winning community experience provides prospective students, parents and counselors with a place to deepen engagement throughout the admissions process.

With its new Social Media for Business certificate, MSOE is taking the next step to show technical professionals how to incorporate social media best practices into their organizations. The university co-developed the certificate program with 7Summits. The three-level program offers a broad perspective of social media and its applications, teaches participants how to evaluate the performance of social media and finishes by developing a detailed social media strategy for each participant’s organization, complete with defined outcomes. 7Summits staff will lead the courses, providing instructor-led lectures and hands-on class work.

“At MSOE, our commitment to learning does not end at graduation. The mission of MSOE’s Continuing Studies and Outreach Department is to be a leader in professional development education, with a particular focus on business, engineering and technical professions. Social Media is changing the way companies do business,” said Dr. Kathy Faggiani, director of continuing studies and outreach for MSOE. “Partnering with 7Summits to provide social media training leverages some of the best resources available to provide a certificate that will help organizations and professionals stay ahead of the curve of social business.”

MSOE Continuing Studies and Outreach offers professional development courses in business, engineering and technical fields, creating a link between the university and the business community. MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related fields. The university has a national academic reputation and longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The Midwest University Consortium for Advanced Manufacturing is comprised of the five universities of the Wisconsin Center for Commercialization Resources group (Milwaukee School of Engineering, Marquette University, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Parkside and UW-Whitewater) and Purdue University. Their recent survey of 400 manufacturing firms in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin indicated that firms are seeking continuing education options for social media.

Originally published July 30, 2012

Social business agency 7Summits has partnered with Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE), an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students and a reputation for ingenuity, to provide education in social media for business. Social Media for Business courses will be provided through MSOE’s Continuing Studies and Outreach Department beginning Sept. 4, 2012, to give engineering, business and technical professionals the opportunity to earn a Social Media for Business Certificate.

“At MSOE, our commitment to learning does not end at graduation. The mission of MSOE’s Continuing Studies and Outreach Department is to be a leader in professional development education, with a particular focus on business, engineering and technical professions. Social Media is changing the way companies do business,” said Dr. Kathy Faggiani, director of continuing studies and outreach for MSOE. “Partnering with 7Summits to provide social media training leverages some of the best resources available to provide certification that will help organizations and professionals stay ahead of the curve of social business.”

MSOE began its relationship with 7Summits through the launch of its online social community designed to revolutionize the admissions process. The award winning community experience, Bridge, provides prospective students, parents and counselors with a place to deepen engagement throughout the admissions process.

Having co-developed the Social Media for Business curriculum with MSOE, 7Summits staff will also lead the course, providing instructor-led lectures and hands-on class work.

“7Summits has spent the last three years exclusively supporting Fortune companies’ adoption of social media and online communities to drive measureable business results. We are pleased to more broadly introduce the best practices that we have developed by offering these important curricula along with MSOE,” said 7Summits CEO Paul Stillmank. “MSOE has already proven they are a leader in the evolution of business teaching and it’s no surprise that they saw the importance of supporting business leaders as they prepare for this new world of business.”

Divided into three levels, each course meets once a week for three weeks.

Level one, Social Media Specialist, provides a broad perspective of social media and its application both internally and externally. Participants gain insights regarding how to become active members of a social media team and evaluate which technologies and/or social outlets are best suited to support their organization’s specific business needs, while transforming to a more socially connected organization.

Level two, Community/Social Media Manager, leverages the understanding of the foundational knowledge gained in level one and provides skills and tactics necessary to research, participate in and create social media communities. Participants will achieve the necessary skills to support their organization’s participation in a managed social media program, while gaining an understanding of how to evaluate performance.

Level three, Social Business Strategist, is the capstone of the Social Media for Business Certification. It allows participants to apply the knowledge learned in levels one and two of the program to a comprehensive, holistic and broader understanding of social media in conjunction with driving business value and outcomes. Participants will begin to develop a detailed social media strategy for their organization, complete with defined outcomes linked to an overall business and organizational strategy with specific measurements to monitor and evaluate performance.
Upon completion of level three, participants will receive their Social Media for Business Certification.

Visit http://bec.msoe.edu/social_media/ to learn more and register for courses, which begin in September.

About 7Summits
7Summits, www.7SummitsAgency.com, is a Social Business Agency founded in 2009 to help clients engage customers, partners and employees to grow their business. 7Summits’ solutions deliver results by improving both social relevancy and community enablement. The firm refers to this approach as Applied Social Media, and has helped many Fortune 500 brands to become more socially connected organizations. 7Summits offers deep expertise in social business strategy, community experience design, platform development, and community activation.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering
MSOE Continuing Studies and Outreach offers professional development courses in business, engineering and technical fields, creating a link between the university and the business community. MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related fields. The university has a national academic reputation and longstanding ties to business and industry.

Originally published August 2, 2012

For the fifth year in a row, Milwaukee School of Engineering was named one of America’s Top Colleges by Forbes. MSOE has been included on the list every year since Forbes began ranking colleges and universities in 2008.

To compile the list, Forbes reviewed postsecondary institutions in the U.S. in five general categories: post graduate success, student satisfaction, debt, four-year graduation rate, and competitive awards. According to Forbes, “The 650 institutions of higher education in this ranking are schools which award undergraduate degrees or certificates requiring 4 or more years of study, according to the U.S. Department of Education, and only those schools categorized by The Carnegie Foundation as Doctorate-granting Universities, Master‘s Colleges and Universities, or Baccalaureate Colleges are included in this sample of schools.” There are more than 2,500 colleges and universities in the United States.

Read more about the Forbes ranking and view the complete list of America’s Top Colleges.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 27, 2012

Construction will begin soon on an innovative and experiential learning center for the MSOE School of Nursing. New nursing labs and classrooms are being built on the first floor of the Student Life and Campus Center. The $3 million, 25,000 square-foot facility is expected to be completed this fall, and will be the new location for the School of Nursing classrooms, labs and faculty offices. MSOE Regent Kathy Ruehlow, an MSOE graduate through the merger with the Milwaukee County General Hospital School of Nursing, is a major supporter.

The new space is nearly quadruple the size of the existing nursing labs, and will allow faculty to enhance the already innovative education experience that is the hallmark of an MSOE education. Nursing students actively engage in simulation-based learning opportunities in authentic representations of actual healthcare situations. They integrate theoretical learning into practice through experiential learning opportunities that allow for repetition, feedback, evaluation and reflection.

“Students and faculty are extremely excited about this new space,” said Dr. Debra Jenks, School of Nursing department chair. “We educate nurses to care for patients, families and communities in incredibly complex systems. The quality of this space will match what faculty are currently doing in the curriculum.”

The new nursing experiential learning and simulation center will include:

  • Four simulation suites connected by a central nurses station, similar to a hospital intensive care unit
    • Each simulation suite includes a patient room with computer-controlled mannequins and medical equipment, a control room for nursing faculty, and an area for students to debrief following a simulation.
  • Two assessment, or “studio” labs, which can function as labs or classrooms
  • Two general labs
  • Two traditional classrooms featuring retractable walls that, when open, will connect to simulation rooms.
  • One home care lab, which will be set up like a studio apartment. Nursing students will learn how to care for patients in their homes, monitor chronic illnesses at home, use e-health applications, and experience end-of-life and hospice situations.
  • Twenty faculty offices

In addition, the center will be cross-disciplinary. Biomedical engineering, mechanical engineering and industrial engineering students will access the home care lab to test medical equipment and evaluate its technological fit and function in a patient’s home. Graduate students in MSOE’s perfusion program will access the simulation suite replicated as a hospital operating room.

With the expansion of the School of Nursing facilities, MSOE will be able to increase enrollment in the nursing program by 20 percent. Since 1995, the MSOE School of Nursing has been educating students who become excellent nurses. The proof is in the 100% placement rate for graduates, and the May 2012 pass rate of 100% on the NCLEX licensing exam. Graduates leave MSOE prepared to tackle some of the most challenging but rewarding positions out there, including emergency, pediatrics and end-of-life.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 24, 2012

Thanks to dedicated alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends, MSOE won the local bracket of the Social Madness Competition, which was sponsored by The Business Journal.

The competition began June 1 with the goal of increasing the number of followers and connections MSOE has on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn through its institutional accounts. MSOE’s followers were also encouraged to vote for the university on the Social Madness website.

On July 17, MSOE was named the Milwaukee Social Madness champion in the medium companies category, and earned the chance to participate in the competition at the national level.

From June 1-July 20, MSOE saw a 13% increase in the number of Twitter followers; a 25% increase in Facebook fans; and a 9% increase in LinkedIn connections.

The national competition is underway, and MSOE is taking on companies across the country in the medium companies category. Please vote for MSOE; Like MSOE on FacebookFollow MSOE on Twitter and Connect with MSOE on LinkedIn.

Originally published July 19, 2012

The Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM) at Milwaukee School of Engineering has been awarded a five-year, $1.3 million Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support a project entitled Teachers FIRST (From Interesting Research to Scientific Teaching).

Teachers FIRST is a professional development program for high school science teachers that is focused on the emerging fields of genomics and personalized medicine. CBM staff will work closely with high school teachers to develop innovative instructional materials that will engage their students in an active, inquiry-driven exploration of these new fields of science. In addition, the project will train participating teachers to measure the impact of using the instructional materials on their students’ learning, i.e., to use the scientific teaching approach to classroom instruction.

Building on the success of previous CBM projects, the Teachers FIRST instructional materials will include both physical models and molecular animations of proteins that play key roles in the research being conducted. These tools will help teachers tell their students stories of “interesting research” currently being carried out in biomolecular research laboratories. In addition, the cellular context in which the proteins function will be illustrated in unique cellular landscapes created by molecular artist David Goodsell, of Scripps Research Institute.

“Interesting research” currently being conducted in active biomolecular research laboratories that will be featured in Teachers FIRST materials includes:

  • The use of zinc finger nucleuses (ZFNs) to engineer human genomes.
  • The generation of a universal flu vaccine, directed against the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein.
  • Variation in drug metabolism by cytochrome p450 enzymes: a story of personalized medicine.

This is the third in a series of major NIH SEPA awards to the CBM. Previous projects have focused on the development of innovative instructional materials related to basic concepts of molecular structure and function in two student-enrichment programs, each of which is currently being disseminated at the national level: The SMART Team program (Students Modeling A Research Topic) matches teams of high school students and their teacher with a local research lab; and The Science Olympiad Protein Modeling event, which was developed by the CBM as a large-scale way to introduce high school students to basic concepts of protein structure and function.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 19, 2012

The Fluid Power Institute™ at Milwaukee School of Engineering has been a leader in motion control and fluid power education, research and evaluation since 1962 (watch MSOE Fluid Power Institute Milestones video). FPI held a 50th anniversary celebration July 12 featuring an afternoon of presentations and tours, followed by an awards dinner where four individuals were recognized for their contributions to fluid power.

Thomas S. Wanke, director of the Fluid Power Institute, received the first ever MSOE Fluid Power Achievement Award for his tireless efforts and steadfast insistence for excellence that has led to the outstanding reputation of the MSOE Fluid Power Institute. This award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated exemplary service in the field of fluid power, including the development of successful products or services; applying research to deliver safe, clean and efficient energy designed to better our society; and providing leadership in developing well-educated engineers. In addition, the award recipient shows evidence of continued improvement of fluid power education by connecting the educational experience with the professional practice of engineering.

The Otto Maha Pioneer in Fluid Power Award was given to Dr. Medhat Khalil, director of professional education, MSOE; Eric Lanke, CEO of the National Fluid Power Association; and Paul Michael, research chemist, MSOE Fluid Power Institute.

Otto Maha was a pioneer in the fluid power industry through his leadership, personal contribution and generous financial support of fluid power education and research all through his professional life. He was one of the earliest leaders to use fluid power in manufacturing and his developments helped establish Parker-Hannifin Corporation as a world leader in the field of motion and control technologies.  The Otto Maha Award was instituted at MSOE in 2007 to honor individuals who exemplify Maha’s spirit of advancement of fluid power education and research through their contribution and leadership.

About the award winners
Thomas S. Wanke ’78, ‘96
Tom Wanke has been an innovator in the study and development of motion control and fluid power education ever since 1975 when he became an MSOE student. In addition to providing hydraulic training to countless fluid power industry leaders, he has directed programs in fluid power systems design and endurance testing, electrohydraulics, fluid development and contamination control. Wanke has served the profession in numerous ways, including leadership in the development of industry standards through the National Fluid Power Association and the educational portion of the International Fluid Power Exposition. He has created an environment of learning, experimenting and discovering that will leave an imprint on MSOE for decades to come.

Dr. Medhat Khalil
Dr. Medhat Khalil is the director of professional education at MSOE, where he oversees the fluid power and motion control professional education seminars. He has more than 20 years of experience in fluid power control. Prior to joining MSOE, Dr. Khalil was a hydraulic system simulation software developer for CAE Incorporated. He also was the technical officer and training manager for Mannesmann Rexroth in Egypt. He is a member of education outreach of the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power. He has extensive experience in modeling and simulation of hydraulic systems and designing electro-hydraulic systems.

Eric Lanke
Eric Lanke is the CEO of the National Fluid Power Association, which represents more than 300 companies serving the hydraulic and pneumatic industries. He works with the NFPA board of directors to set the strategic direction of the association. He oversees all association programs and communications. Prior to the NFPA, Mr. Lanke worked at Executive Director Inc. where he held leadership positions with the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. He also serves on the board of the Wisconsin Society of Association Executives, where he led a task force focused on the adoption of for-profit innovative practices by non-profit organizations.

Paul Michael
Paul Michael is a research chemist in the Fluid Power Institute. He has more than 30 years of experience in the formulation and testing of hydraulic fluids and lubricants. He is an STLE Certified Lubrication Specialist. Since coming to MSOE, Mr. Michael has been influential on U.S. Marine Corps hydraulic and power train lubricants projects. In addition to his research in contamination analysis, he is currently investigating energy efficient hydraulic fluids in the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power. He has written several papers on hydraulic fluid viscosity, motor wear, and torque ripple in addition to several books on lubrication and tribology.

About the Fluid Power Institute
FPI conducts research and testing for some of the largest hydraulic companies including Parker Hannifin, Caterpillar Inc., John Deere and others, as well as system evaluations for the U.S. military. FPI’s on-campus 2,400 square-foot Fluid Power Research Laboratory has the capacity and horsepower to operate a wide variety of hydraulic components under high-pressure and flow conditions. It has specialized equipment for pump, valve, motor, cylinder and filter testing. In 2012 FPI opened an off-site facility in the Chase Commerce Center on the south side of Milwaukee. It features 8,800 square feet of open space, a 21-foot ceiling and large overheard crane capacity for evaluation of large components, systems and complete machines.

FPI conducts endurance testing, performance testing and environmental evaluations as well as component and system design, modeling and simulation, reliability analyses and system integration. In addition, a fully instrumented Tribology laboratory supports research and conducts separate analysis projects.

Graduate and undergraduate research students interested in the fluid power industry work directly with companies in a real world hands-on environment that directly involves them in applied research, thus fostering purposeful and effective research training.

The Professional Education and Technology Outreach department of the Applied Technology Center™ consults with FPI’s corporate clients to determine their training needs to build customized training programs.

FPI has been a member of the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) for more than 30 years. MSOE faculty and staff are active on several NFPA and ISO fluid power standards development committees, including the Technical Board, and Fluids and Education Committees. FPI also supports the activities of the Fluid Power Educational Foundation and the International Fluid Power Society.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 10, 2012

MSOE students, faculty and staff will welcome nearly 400 high school students to campus starting this week. The students are moving in to the MSOE residence halls for the university’s “Focus on the Possibilities” summer programs, which are filled to near-capacity with students anxious to learn more about some of the most in-demand careers: engineering, nursing and business.

Recognizing that there will be tremendous job growth in these fields in the near future, these students aren’t wasting any time diving in and planning for their college career. Those with a broad interest in engineering will participate in “Discover the Possibilities,” a week-long program that introduces students to a variety of engineering disciplines.

Students who want to concentrate on a specific engineering discipline can take part in “Focus on Engineering.” In these intense, week-long camps, they choose to focus on one of the following: architectural engineering and construction management; biomedical engineering; computer engineering; electrical engineering; mechanical/industrial engineering; or software engineering. Students get hands-on experience working in MSOE’s labs on exciting projects with faculty.

Other students will become a nurse for a week during “Focus on Nursing.” They will learn about the different levels of nursing (CNA to Ph.D.); organ donation, nursing assessment of adult and pediatric patients; the history of nursing; and the current U.S. health care system. The students will tour specialty areas inside local hospitals, including a hyperbaric chamber, intensive care unit, neonatal intensive care unit and intervention radiology. They’ll also participate in hands-on activities in MSOE’s state-of-the-art critical care laboratory.

Business-minded students will run their own business for a week during “Focus on Business.” They’ll learn about the business functions that make companies successful, and how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. Students will study market-oriented mission statements, leadership and teamwork in business, integrated marketing strategies, financial and economic aspects in business, and professional presentation techniques.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 15, 2012

Starting July 16, 25 middle school girls from the Waukesha School District will spend an energetic week exploring the fun of hands-on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), and initiating mentoring relationships with women in STEM careers. The week-long learning program, GE Girls at MSOE, is sponsored by GE Healthcare Women’s Network in collaboration with Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the Waukesha STEM Academy.

“Studies show that while a majority of today’s girls have a clear interest in STEM, they don’t prioritize STEM fields when thinking about future careers. Furthermore, girls express that they don’t know a lot about STEM careers and opportunities,” says Dee Mellor, GE Healthcare’s Vice President and Chief Quality Officer, and executive champion of the GE Women’s Network, an employee group that provides leadership development, advancement and career broadening opportunities. “With help from our partners, the GE Women’s Network is working to foster lasting interest in STEM among girls in our community and share our enthusiasm for these fields.”

This is the first time this program is taking place in Milwaukee. This summer, GE is also conducting GE Girls at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in Massachusetts for the second consecutive year and GE Girls at Rensselaer (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) in New York for the first time.

In Milwaukee, students will be bused daily to MSOE where they will gain instruction from two Waukesha STEM Academy teachers and MSOE faculty. Daily lessons will focus on construction, programming, electronics, healthcare and chemistry. The exclusive GE Healthcare curriculum includes activities featuring medical technologies, physiology and biomedical engineering. Girls will have the opportunity to experiment with X-ray physics, operate ultrasound technology, and measure metabolic function with real medical devices. Before the week is over, each program participant will also meet an accomplished female mentor from the GE Women’s Network, primarily with engineering or technology backgrounds.

“Getting more girls on board with STEM requires deliberate strategies on the part of educators to connect learning with real-life experiences,” said Principal Ryan Krohn, Waukesha STEM Academy. “Teaming with GE Healthcare and MSOE creates a wonderful opportunity to show our participating students how classroom math and science can translate into higher education and rewarding careers.”

Interested sixth- and seventh-graders applied this spring, and participants were selected by Waukesha Public School faculty. GE worked with MSOE to develop curriculum and exercises.

“The GE Girls at MSOE program enables us to reach girls during their middle school years, before many of them start losing interest in math and science,” said Olga Imas, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at MSOE. “It would be incredibly satisfying to see any of these girls again as MSOE students someday.”

GE Healthcare has a long history of supporting education in the Milwaukee area through a host of GE Volunteer efforts, the GE Foundation grant to Milwaukee Public Schools, and an annual Community Service Day. GE Girls at MSOE is another way GE Healthcare is investing in the greater Milwaukee community.

About GE Healthcare
GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services that are shaping a new age of patient care. Our broad expertise in medical imaging and information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies, performance improvement and performance solutions services help our customers to deliver better care to more people around the world at a lower cost. In addition, we partner with healthcare leaders, striving to leverage the global policy change necessary to implement a successful shift to sustainable healthcare systems.

Our “healthymagination” vision for the future invites the world to join us on our journey as we continuously develop innovations focused on reducing costs, increasing access and improving quality and efficiency around the world. Headquartered in the United Kingdom, GE Healthcare is a $16 billion unit of General Electric Company (NYSE: GE). Worldwide, GE Healthcare employs more than 46,000 people committed to serving healthcare professionals and their patients in more than 100 countries. For more information about GE Healthcare, visit our website at www.gehealthcare.com.

For our latest news, please visit http://newsroom.gehealthcare.com.

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published June 28, 2012

In May, Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce (WMC) awarded WAICU one of its nine annual Friend of the Environment Awards. WAICU won the Friend of the Environment: Environmental Innovation award for its EPA/DNR Environmental Health and Safety Audit program. Milwaukee School of Engineering is a member of the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (WAICU), the official organization of the private, nonprofit institutions of higher learning in this state.

MSOE, with the other WAICU members, saved hundreds of thousands of dollars as a result of this one WAICU program. Even more important, the program and the WMC award reinforces WAICU’s and MSOE’s deep commitment to protecting the environment.

MSOE was the first private university in Wisconsin to begin voluntary environmental health and safety inspections. MSOE joined 19 other private colleges and universities in Wisconsin in stepping forward with a green initiative that won the support of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in September 2008. The colleges and universities performed voluntary self‐audits to assure compliance with major environmental laws.

“There are a large number of laboratories on the MSOE campus with industrial-grade equipment and hazardous material, and we have a long history of safely operating these labs. As a result of the peer audit and subsequent upgrades to our policies, we have raised safety and related compliance matters even further,” said Armund Janto, MSOE vice president of finance and CFO. “We belong to WAICU so we can work together to advance educational opportunity. Our faculty, staff and students are extremely cooperative and safety-conscious. We care about the environment and being responsible citizens.”

“Our peer audit program continues to evolve,” explained WAICU president Dr. Rolf Wegenke. “It is through WAICU members’ willingness to collaborate and innovate that we have been successful in our efforts to safeguard the environment.”

“Wisconsin businesses are dedicated to protecting our natural resources, not only because it’s smart business, but because it’s the right thing to do,” said Mr. Kurt Bauer, WMC president/CEO. “The winners of this award are the best of the best when it comes to keeping Wisconsin clean and creating jobs.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published July 9, 2012

The Fluid Power Institute™ at Milwaukee School of Engineering has been a leader in motion control and fluid power education, research and evaluation since 1962. On Thursday, July 12, FPI will celebrate its 50th anniversary and the continuing growth of fluid power with a day of seminars and tours followed by dinner on the MSOE campus. Afternoon presentations include:

  • Matthew Blieske, director of systems development, General Compression
    “Creating a New Frontier in Energy Conversion and Renewable Power Generation”
  • R. Edwin Howe, president, Enfield Technologies
    “Advanced Pneumatics in Medical Devices”
  • Jeff Insch, senior product Manager, Olmsted Products Group, Oilgear
    “Oil Rig Active Ballasting System Application”
  • Kim Stelson, director, Engineering Research Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power
    “Future Directions for the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power”
  • Eric Lanke, CAE, CEO, National Fluid Power Association
    Moderator, Panel Discussion
  • Thomas S. Wanke, director of the Fluid Power Institute, will receive the first ever MSOE Fluid Power Achievement Award during the anniversary dinner.
  • John E. Duncan, MSOE Regent and President, Off-Road Driveline Technology & Axel Systems at ZF Inc. is the master of ceremonies.
  • Douglas R. Oberhelman, chairman and CEO of Caterpillar Inc. will offer congratulatory remarks via video.
  • Jim Baumgartner, director of corporate public affairs, Caterpillar Inc. will deliver the keynote address.

About the Fluid Power Institute
FPI conducts research and testing for some of the largest hydraulic companies including Parker Hannifin, Caterpillar Inc., John Deere and others, as well as system evaluations for the U.S. military. FPI’s on-campus 2,400 square-foot Fluid Power Research Laboratory has the capacity and horsepower to operate a wide variety of hydraulic components under high-pressure and flow conditions. It has specialized equipment for pump, valve, motor, cylinder and filter testing. In 2012 FPI opened an off-site facility in the Chase Commerce Center on the south side of Milwaukee. It features 8,800 square feet of open space, a 21-foot ceiling and large overheard crane capacity for evaluation of large components, systems and complete machines.

FPI conducts endurance testing, performance testing and environmental evaluations as well as component and system design, modeling and simulation, reliability analyses and system integration. In addition, a fully instrumented Tribology laboratory supports research and conducts separate analysis projects.

Graduate and undergraduate research students interested in the fluid power industry work directly with companies in a real world hands-on environment that directly involves them in applied research, thus fostering purposeful and effective research training.

The Professional Education and Technology Outreach department of the Applied Technology Center™ consults with FPI’s corporate clients to determine their training needs to build customized training programs.

FPI has been a member of the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) for more than 30 years. MSOE faculty and staff are active on several NFPA and ISO fluid power standards development committees, including the Technical Board, and Fluids and Education Committees. FPI also supports the activities of the Fluid Power Educational Foundation and the International Fluid Power Society.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published June 15, 2012

Students at Milwaukee School of Engineering continually push the limits when it comes to their design projects, and this year’s Supermileage Vehicle Team is no exception. Members of the MSOE Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) created a single-person, fuel-efficient vehicle by redesigning and modifying a 150cc Briggs and Stratton engine, sleeved down to 47cc with a Honda overhead cam and adjustable, stock Honda carburetor.

The project began at the start of the school year and ended in June when the team took their finished supermileage vehicle to Marshall, Mich., for the SAE Supermileage Vehicle Competition. Teams are given basic guidelines and then work to create a vehicle that gets the best miles per gallon while meeting safety requirements.

Thirty-two collegiate teams from around the world converged on the Eaton Proving Grounds to see how their vehicles would stand up to the competition. The first challenge was passing technical inspection. This year, MSOE’s team was the first one to make it through the technical inspection on the first try—they didn’t have to make any modifications to their vehicle and they passed all of the dynamic events. Only 13 out of the 32 vehicles passed technical inspection and were allowed to compete on the track!

Next, the team had to declare what their predicted fuel economy would be. Based on their design and the performance of previous MSOE vehicles, the team predicted their vehicle would achieve 843 miles per gallon.

Finally, it was time to head out to the track for some test runs. They tried a few different driving strategies and made their plan. Rising early the next day, the team completed five competitive runs on the course, with three runs halted by minor electrical problems. Their first run achieved 812 mpg. The following runs ranged between 779 and 800 mpg. At the end of the day, they decided to hit the track one more time—right before the track was set to close—to see if they could beat the fuel economy of their first run. The ninth time was the charm: they reached 842 mpg.

Their final run was good enough to land them a 6th place finish overall in the competition. They also brought home the award for “Closest to Predicted Fuel Economy.” The team was led this year by Meghan Krause, a mechanical engineering sophomore, and was advised by Dr. Chris Damm, associate professor of mechanical engineering.

Read more about the team’s success in Michigan and also at the Shell Eco-Marathon in April in Houston on their website: http://sae.groups.msoe.edu/smv

Congratulations to all members of the team: Meghan Krause, president; Charlie Scanlon, vice president; Caleb Nitz, media manager; Patrick Comiskey, sponsorship manager; Chris Dostal, treasurer; Todd Brooke, David Doyle, Matt Drea, Ethan Ensign, Michael Fricke, Scott Gray, Joseph Hoffmann, James Ihrcke, Kyung Kwan Jang, Greg Kucab, Chi Hin Lui, John Ohme, James Reed, Robert Runte, Michael Rutas, Evan Schilling, Michael Storm, Alex Weise, Steven Weyer and Thomas Wojtowitcz.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published June 21, 2012

Rhonda Powell, MSOE adjunct nursing clinical instructor, is also a doctoral candidate in nursing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). She has been chosen by the The Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence as members of the prestigious Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholar Program. Read more…

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published June 13, 2012

Each academic quarter, graduating students from MSOE are invited to nominate an individual from their own secondary school experience or their working experience—someone who not only “knew her/his stuff,” but could communicate it, and whose commitment to others included encouragement of further educational and career goals. MSOE is proud to recognize those who have had a significant influence on their students’ futures. Not only does MSOE shine a spotlight on its graduates, but also thank those, who in some important way, motivated them, inspired them and helped make it happen for them.

Congratulations to the following:

Steve Akin, Sussex (Wis.) Hamilton High School
Akin was nominated by his former student Joshua Kapelke, who graduated from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering. He  said, “Mr. Akin’s regular lectures were very fast paced, yet he made sure that every topic was being taught in its entirety. The casual yet informative lectures made sure that every student understood the material and was comfortable.”

James Anderson, McHenry (Ill.) West High School
Anderson was nominated by his former student Marshall Schaeffer, who graduated with high honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. Schaeffer said, “The primary trait that made Mr. Anderson an exceptional teacher was his genuine interest in his students. This coupled with his extreme patience and dedication as he helped guide his students to ‘find the answer within themselves.’”

Todd Everson and Joan Hartung, Milwaukee School of Languages
Both were nominated by their former student John Eggert, who graduated with honors from MSOE with bachelor’s degrees in architectural engineering and construction management. Eggert said, “Mr. Everson is an incredible educator and has motivated me to pursue a career in architectural engineering. He is an extremely effective educator who gives his students one-on-one, direct instruction and incorporates a variety of teaching strategies to assist his students in understanding the abstract and difficult concepts of physics. Ms. Hartung is a very dedicated, passionate and patient teacher and is always willing to go the extra mile for her students. She has given me the resources and motivation to pursue my goals.”

Rich Frost, Neenah (Wis.) High School
Frost was nominated by his former student Paul Gessler, who graduated with honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. He said, “Mr. Frost is an outstanding educator because his teaching style encourages students to ask questions about material rather than take his word for it. His style also promotes the higher-level synthesis-type thought process required in higher education and beyond, especially in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.”

Christopher Kraly, West Bend (Wis.) East High School
Kraly was nominated by his former student Kasteny Knutson, who graduated from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering. Knutson said, “Mr. Kraly gave me the greatest gift a teacher can give a student—a strong work ethic. His high expectations drove me to endure when I wanted to give up and to succeed when all I could see was my failures.”

Fr. James Kurzynski, Regis High School (Eau Claire, Wis.)
Kurzynski was nominated by his former student Brittany Farley, who graduated with honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. She said, “Fr. James is an outstanding educator and truly devoted to the well-being of his students. Fr. James’ dedication to others has positively impacted my life as a nursing student, and he has ultimately helped me succeed by teaching me compassion like no one else ever could.”

Brian Leopold, Manteno (Ill.) High School
Leopold was nominated by his former student Jennifer Anderson, who graduated with honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. She said, “Mr. Leopold went out of his way to be sure that each student got the opportunity to make the most of their high school education. He took great initiative to introduce the students to engineering competitions which would not have been present in such a small high school if he hadn’t done so.”

Mark Margelofsky, Bonduel (Wis.) Middle School
Principal Margelofsky was nominated by his former student Amanda Carpenter, who graduated with honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Margelofsky was Carpenter’s social studies teacher at Bonduel Middle School and basketball coach at Bonduel High School. She said, “What makes ‘Mr. Margo’ stand out in my mind as an outstanding educator and person is his kindness, support and joy for mentoring his students and players. He influenced my future education and life goals by always pushing me to do better.”

Heather Molnar, Rome Corners Intermediate School (Oregon, Wis.)
Molnar was nominated by her former student Alex Izzo, who graduated with high honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. Molnar was Izzo’s sixth grade teacher. Izzo said, “Ms. Molnar made math interesting for the students and also displayed a clear, overwhelming passion for the topic herself. This passion as well as her dedication to students has allowed her to become a teacher and a person who I will always remember.”

John and Carla Radewahn (Wauwatosa, Wis.)
Home school educators John and Carla Radewahn were nominated by their son Daniel, who graduated with high honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. Daniel Radewahn said, “VIPs not only educate, but motivate, inspire and instill the desire for knowledge and understanding. VIPs don’t emphasize the power of knowledge, but the wisdom to use the knowledge properly. My parents have done this and infinitely more. They have instilled the importance of hard work, enabled and motivated me to always do my best.”

Theodor Struck, Fachgymnasium Oldenburg (Holstein, Germany)
Struck was nominated by his former student Mareike Redder, who graduated with high honors from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. Redder said, “Mr. Struck made the electrical engineering really easy to understand and interesting. I never would have started this career path without the guidance and education of Mr. Struck.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published June 6, 2012

On Saturday, June 9, Fondy Food Center (Milwaukee) will dedicate a new electric motor designed and installed by Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) students on the Center’s 1950s era Allis Chalmers G tractor.  Brady Corp. (Milwaukee) funded the conversion project. The tractor, which is operated by farmers participating in the Center’s Fondy Farm Project in Port Washington, had a non-functioning gasoline engine.  The converted motor is powered by a 48-volt battery, significantly quieter than its gasoline predecessor, and extremely fuel efficient (just $6 a year in fuel costs). The dedication will take place Saturday, June 9 at 10 am at Fondy’s Port Washington farm.

The work was completed by students Jordan Balcerzak (mechanical engineering), Alex Rode (business management) and Andy Stoginski (management information systems). Alumnus James Connelly ’05 donated his time and tools to the project, and allowed the students to work on the tractor in his garage.
The conversion to an electric motor has a far-reaching impact, from the farmers using the tractor to the local ecosystem to families who purchase food directly from these farmers at the Fondy Farmers Market. This aspect, together with giving students at MSOE an innovative engineering and design opportunity, appealed to project sponsor Brady Corporation Foundation.  “The mission of the Brady Corp. Foundation is to protect our future through partnerships that build strong and sustainable communities where we live and work – and this project is a great example of our mission in action,” explains Steve Hasbrook, Brady’s director of sustainability. “It was an excellent opportunity to introduce and educate engineering students on real-life applications that minimize air and noise pollution, support local economies, and ensure the long-term availability of high-quality, locally grown food to residents on Milwaukee’s north side, many of whom do not have regular access to affordable, fresh, locally grown food.”

Dr. David Howell, associate professor in MSOE’s General Studies Department and Pieper Family Endowed Chair for Servant-Leadership at MSOE, is also the academic coordinator for the Fondy tractor conversion project. “The students working on this conversion gained real-life insight into applications for electrical and mechanical engineering,” explains Dr. Howell. “This project also presents a potential business opportunity as skyrocketing demand for local, sustainably grown food is calling more people to farm on a small scale. These farmers will need innovative, specialized machinery like this tractor. The service component is also particularly meaningful for our students. Many of the farmers participating in the Fondy Farm Project are immigrant and minority farmers who have faced considerable language and cultural obstacles in achieving their dreams. By giving these farmers a high-functioning tractor, our students help those farmers succeed.  This in turn increases the availability of locally grown food to families living on Milwaukee’s North Side.”

According to Stephen Petro, Fondy Farm Project director, “An electric motor not only will save us significant fuel costs but it will also allow our farmers to control speed more precisely – vital when weeding or planting small-seeded vegetables like lettuce. And with less moving parts – no carburetor, no radiator, and no clutch – the tractor will be much more reliable and easier to use for our farmers.”

About the Fondy Food Center
The Fondy Food Center manages two programs: the Fondy Farmers Market at 2200 W. Fond du Lac Avenue, Milwaukee, and the Fondy Farm Project, an 80-acre farm in Port Washington.  The Fondy Farmers Market is a seasonal, producers only, 48,000-sq. food open air market with a permanent roof. Approximately 30 local farmers and vendors sell at the Market, serving up to 2,500 customers a week. The Fondy Farm Project was established in 2011 to address the declining availability of affordable, long-term farmland leases, insufficient agricultural infrastructure and equipment, and limited business skill sets of many of the Market’s farmers.  Nearly 94% of the Market’s farmers are low-income Hmong immigrants.  The Fondy Farm Project gives participating farmers access to affordable, long-term, high-quality farmland plus the amenities they need to succeed. This includes irrigation, greenhouses, tractors, and assistance with business practices and cost-accounting.  Currently there are 10 farmers participating in the Farm. Last year the farmers harvested approximately 370,000 pounds of food, with nearly all of it sold at the Fondy Farmers Market. 

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

About Brady Corp.
Brady Corporation is an international manufacturer and marketer of complete solutions that identify and protect premises, products and people. Its products help customers increase safety, security, productivity and performance and include high-performance labels and signs, safety devices, printing systems and software, and precision die-cut materials. Founded in 1914, Brady has millions of customers in electronics, telecommunications, manufacturing, electrical, construction, education, medical and a variety of other industries. The company is headquartered in Milwaukee and as of July 31, 2011 employed approximately 6,500 people in operations in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Brady’s fiscal 2011 sales were approximately $1.34 billion. More information is available at www.bradycorp.com.

Originally published June 6, 2012

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic with music and stories from the Titanic era at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway. The museum’s popular concert series, “Piano Portraits: The music of Jeffery Hollander,” continues and guests are invited to hear Dr. Jeffrey Hollander create a living concert. The Piano Portraits concert series was created specifically for the Grohmann Museum, and takes thematic inspiration from the museum’s exhibitions. Each concert includes a short tour of the current museum exhibition.

Inspired by classical compositions, popular tunes and jazz improvisations, Hollander weaves a series of fantasies touching on sentiment, brilliance, humor and deep pathos. He shares interesting anecdotes about the composers and requests themes from the audience for improvisation at the conclusion.

Memories of the Titanic
Sunday, June 10, 2 p.m.
Music and stories from the Titanic era as presented by Dr. Jeffrey Hollander, followed by audience requests.

From Gershwin to Grohmann
Saturday, Oct. 13, 2 p.m.
Celebrate the 75th anniversary of George Gershwin’s passing and the 5th anniversary of the Grohmann Museum with the concert works of Gershwin and Tin Pan Alley songs as presented by Dr. Jeffrey Hollander, followed by audience requests.

Tickets are $20 at the door. Members of the Grohmann Museum are admitted for $15. Call 414-277-2300 or email ricea@msoe.edu for more information.

At the age of seven, Hollander was the youngest scholarship winner at the prestigious Eastman School of Music. He received a doctorate in piano performance from legendary Hungarian concert pianist György Sandor.  He often appears in the beautiful lobby of the majestic Pfister Hotel in downtown Milwaukee, and his CD, “Nice Work if You Can Get It,” was created there. Hollander’s stunning concerts have thrilled audiences in America and Europe.  He has appeared as soloist with the Milwaukee and Chicago Symphonies.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 800 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related fields.

Originally published June 6, 2012

MSOE’s Spring Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

 

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 23, 2012

MSOE’s Class of 2012 will be on hand to explain their Senior Projects, Designs and Proposals on Friday, May 25 at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave.; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Collaboration and team work are key components to an MSOE education, whether a student is an engineering major or pursuing a degree in the School of Business or School of Nursing.

Throughout the senior year, students work on a Senior Project. These are an opportunity for students to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. Often, it’s a real-world project for a company or business that’s looking to solve a problem, while other projects are driven purely by a student’s interests and ideas from the classroom.

It all comes to fruition right before graduation at Senior Project Day—the culmination of all that they’ve learned and accomplished in this always interesting, sometimes frustrating and ultimately satisfying experience.

More than 80 senior projects will be on display. Here is a short list of examples:

SAE Baja Vehicle: One of the largest team projects this year, mechanical engineering students worked together to re-design and manufacture an off-road recreational vehicle that meets standards for the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Baja competition. The vehicle can traverse all types of terrain including mud pits, hill climbs, jumps and obstacle-filled trails. Location: Student Life and Campus Center

ASME Human Powered Vehicle:  The primary focus of this design was on the vehicle frame aerodynamics, ergonomics, drive-train, steering and stability. It features a Trek, hands-free recumbent bicycle. The vehicle was designed to compete in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Human Powered Vehicle Challenge. Location: Student Life and Campus Center

Portable Postural Sway Monitor:  This device will monitor how much a patient sways while standing still. The data from the device will help clinicians who treat patients who suffer from instability and in the diagnosis of several neuromuscular conditions. Location: Walter Schroeder Library

ABBSS Detector (Automated Baseball Ball, Strike and Swing Detector):  The ABBSS Detector uses an array of sensors to create a virtual grid that can determine whether a pitch is a ball or strike, which eliminates the inconsistency of umpires’ calls during a game. Location: Werwath Mall

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 29, 2012

Congratulations to the more than 50 Milwaukee School of Engineering students who were nominated for leadership awards this year. The following awards were presented at the annual President’s Student Leadership Awards Dinner on May 9:

Outstanding Student Award
Carol Smith Cayo, of Lake Mills, Wis., was chosen as the 2012 recipient of the Fred F. Loock Outstanding Student Award. This award is presented annually to the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) senior student, who, in the opinion of the faculty, most notably combines an excellent academic record and has at the same time demonstrated leadership and professional bearing in extracurricular or community service activities. It is the most prestigious student testimonial that MSOE bestows. Smith Cayo graduatedwith high honors on May 26 with a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from MSOE.

Other Awards
Vincent R. Canino Outstanding Biomedical Engineering Senior Student Award – Emily Dieringer, Saukeville, Wis., biomedical engineering
Nursing Leadership Award – Brittany Ann Farley, Eau Claire, Wis., nursing
Matt W. Fuchs Outstanding AE&BC Senior Student Award – Noelle Layman, Hubertus, Wis., architectural engineering
Thomas W. Davis Student Leadership Award – Tyler Loehrl, Beloit, Wis., architectural engineering and structural engineering
Daniel E. Sahs Award for Service – Sherri Biendarra, West Bend, Wis., biomolecular engineering
Outstanding Peer Mentor Award – John Ziegler, Elgin, Ill., industrial engineering
Marine Commandant’s Trophy – Casey Kinders, Mt. Pleasant, Wis., mechanical engineering
Resident Assistant Programming Award – Jordan Wagner, Cedarburg, Wis., biomolecular engineering
Greek of the Year Award – Amanda Barrett, Kenosha, Wis., electrical engineering
Student Employee of the Year Award – Daniel Warnke, Oneida, Wis., mechanical engineering
Senior Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Connor Toomey, Burlington, Mass., hockey, construction management
Senior Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Jessica Axt, Germantown, Wis., soccer, biomolecular engineering
Scholar Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Dan Hosko, Pittsburgh, Penn., soccer, architectural engineering
Scholar Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Carol Smith Cayo, Lake Mills, Wis., basketball and tennis, industrial engineering

Faculty/Staff Awards
Several faculty and staff members also were recognized this year:
Oscar Werwath Distinguished Teacher Award – Dr. Frank Mahuta, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management
Johanna Seelhorst Werwath Distinguished Staff Award – Valerie Kimball, Registrar’s Office
Student Advocate Award – Erik Oswald, Career Services Office
Outstanding Mentor Award – Amy Chisnell, TRIO
Greek Advocate of the Year – Julie West, Office of Student Life

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 21, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering is pleased to announce four high school seniors have been awarded a Presidential Scholarship for four years of full tuition. To qualify for MSOE’s most prestigious scholarship, students needed a minimum 3.80 cumulative GPA and 28 or higher composite score on the ACT (1240 SAT) and be accepted for enrollment by February 1. In addition, the students attended and competed at a scholarship event, took part in an interview process and provided an essay. Congratulations to all of the scholarship winners:

Jonathan Braaten
Glasgow, Mont.
Glasgow Senior High School
Mechanical Engineering

Sofia Garcia
Hartland, Wis.
Arrowhead Union High School
Biomedical Engineering

Mitchell Gieske
Mequon, Wis.
Homestead High School
Nursing

Ana Sofia Larraga Martinez
Monroe, Wis.
Monroe High School
International Business

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 21, 2012

More than 350 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Spring Commencement, Saturday, May 26, at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from Michael J. Barber ’82, MSOE Regent and vice president of molecular imaging for GE Healthcare. Barber also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree.

Alexander G. Izzo is the class respondent. Izzo is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. Izzo and Carol Smith Cayo, who is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering, will receive the Alumni Association Award. The award is given to students who have made time in their hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

About Michael Barber:
Michael J. Barber, MSOE Regent and supporter, is a GE officer and vice president of the molecular imaging business for the corporation. He graduated from MSOE in 1982 with a B.S. in electrical engineering. His career with GE Healthcare has spanned 30 years and started with an internship while attending MSOE. “I was interning in an electronics lab and I was able to be more proficient, more so than the interns from other schools, and I directly attribute that to doing labs at MSOE; not just learning the theory, but also the practical application,” said Barber.

In his role as VP of molecular imaging, Barber and his team are responsible for developing innovative ways to detect diseases earlier and monitor disease progression. Molecular Imaging is positioned to help solve the clinical and research challenges in oncology, neurology and cardiology.

Prior to this position Barber was vice president of GE’s business strategy on global health, called healthymagination. The healthymagination goal is to improve the quality of care, to reduce the cost of procedures and processes through the appropriate use of GE technologies and services and to increase the access to essential technologies and services essential to health. Barber was the first leader of healthymagination and delivered 50 products targeting cost, quality and access as well as established key partnerships for GE in the cancer, maternal and newborn health and emerging markets.

During his career, Barber has had a variety of roles in engineering, operations and product management. As the manager of the Digital X-ray Detector Platform, Barber led a team that eliminated the need for film in X-ray procedures. Barber holds patents for novel X-ray system designs and has been directly involved with many product advances in the field of diagnostic imaging. As VP and chief technology officer for GE Healthcare he led a team of more than 7,000 engineers, technologists and scientists working in diverse fields such as MRI, CT, ultrasound, patient monitoring, anesthesia, life sciences, imaging contrast agents and health-related R&D.

Barber is an active champion of GE’s African American Forum and has also served as chair of the Milwaukee Chapter of GE Volunteers (a volunteer organization of GE employees). He is active in combating health care disparities in the United States, was named to the Business Journal’s Top 40 Under 40 in 1997 and was named as a “Master of Innovation” in 2009 by Black Enterprise. He and his wife Jackie Herd-Barber ’84, who is an MSOE Corporation member, have both been inducted into the MSOE Alumni Hall of Fame. They also established the Jackie Herd-Barber and Michael Barber Scholarship, which supports MSOE students.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 22, 2012

Three industrial engineering majors at Milwaukee School of Engineering were recognized by the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE). The awards were announced at IIE’s Annual IE Conference and Expo. Students from around the world were nominated for these awards.

Carol Smith Cayo, from Lake Mills, Wis., received the third place James W. Barany Student Award for Excellence which recognizes undergraduate students who, since the beginning of their junior year, have distinguished themselves through excellence of scholarship and campus leadership. The award singles out those who have brought distinction to industrial engineering at their institution. Cayo will graduate this spring with a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and has accepted a job offer to be an implementation consultant/project manager for a health care software company.

Adam Van Handel, a junior from Appleton, Wis., received the Presidents Scholarship for $1,000 in recognition of his excellence in scholarly activities and leadership of the industrial engineering profession. To be eligible for the scholarship, candidates must be active in an IIE student chapter and must have demonstrated leadership and promoted IIE involvement on campus.

Spenser Brown, a sophomore double majoring in industrial engineering and business management, from Lafayette, Ind., received a $3,000 Dwight D. Gardner Scholarship, which is given to undergraduate students majoring in industrial engineering at any school in the United States, Canada or Mexico with an accredited industrial engineering program.

“These three students epitomize the skills and behaviors needed to excel in business today through their high standards, focus, drive and ability to manage their time while juggling classes, work and extracurricular activities,” said Dr. Charlene Yauch, MSOE assistant professor and industrial engineering program director. “It is great for a small industrial engineering program to get this level of recognition, and it is a tribute to the high caliber of students at MSOE.”

IIE is the world’s largest professional society dedicated solely to the support of the industrial engineering profession and individuals involved with improving quality and productivity. Founded in 1948, IIE is an international, nonprofit association that provides leadership for the application, education, training, research and development of industrial engineering.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 23, 2012

Seniors will be on hand to explain their Senior Projects, Designs and Proposals on Friday, May 27 at Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave.; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; and Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway.

Collaboration and team work are key components to an MSOE education, whether a student is an engineering major or pursuing a degree in the School of Business or School of Nursing.

Throughout the senior year, students work on a Senior Project. These are an opportunity for students to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. Often, it’s a real-world project for a company or business that’s looking to solve a problem, while other projects are driven purely by a student’s interests and ideas from the classroom.

It all comes to fruition right before graduation at Senior Project Day—the culmination of all that they’ve learned and accomplished in this always interesting, sometimes frustrating and ultimately satisfying experience.

More than 85 senior projects will be on display. Here is a short list of examples:

SAE Formula Hybrid Car: One of the largest team projects this year, mechanical engineering and electrical engineering students worked together to design, build and test an efficient race car that met the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Formula Hybrid car specifications. The car’s power source 48 M28™ LITHIUM-ION Battery Packs from Milwaukee Electric Tool powering two electric motors, supplemented by an onboard gasoline electric generator. Location: Student Life and Campus Center

ASABE ¼ Scale Tractor Pull:  See MSOE’s first-ever entry for the International ¼-Scale Tractor Student Design Competition. The team will compete against 26 other colleges and universities in a four-hook tractor pull, a maneuverability competition, design judging and presentation. Location: Student Life and Campus Center

Wave Power Generation:  A prototype designed to harness the energy and power that can be generated by waves on small, inland lakes.  Location: Student Life and Campus Center

Lunar H-Axis Washer:  A conceptual design of a method to clean clothing in a lunar habitat, such as the International Space Station.  Location: Walter Schroeder Library

MSOE is an independent university with 2,600 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and starting salaries. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 17, 2012

MSOE’s student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers took second place overall in the regional ASCE Student Steel Bridge Competition. They earned first place in stiffness and display category and second place in the construction speed, lightness, economy and efficiency category. The Concrete Canoe Team placed fourth overall, and the students took third place in the environmental competition.

The MSOE ASCE Steel Bridge Team will now travel to Clemson University May 25-26, 2012 for the 2012 ASCE/AISC National Student Steel Bridge Competition, where they’ll compete against 46 other university teams from across the United States.

Congratulations and good luck to all of the Steel Bridge Team members (pictured, left to right):

  • Alex Flunker, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Eau Claire, Wis.
  • Matt Dixon, software engineering, Walworth, Wis.
  • Patrick Flaherty, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Carson City, Nev.
  • Brett Kash, architectural engineering and construction management, Homer, N.Y.
  • Ryan Kaput, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Chicago
  • Collin Keeton, architectural engineering, Machesney Park, Ill.
  • Brandon Shea, architectural engineering, Merrillville, Ind.
  • Blake Gleason, construction management, New Lenox, Ill.
  • Gabe Bonn, architectural engineering and construction management, Freeland, Mich.
  • Matt Schultz, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Brookfield, Wis.
  • Jeff Henriksen, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Eau Claire, Wis.
  • Austin Heide, construction management, Stevens Point, Wis.
  • Brittany Leis, architectural engineering, Watertown, Wis.
  • Dustin Kuderer, architectural engineering, Brookfield, Wis.
  • Not pictured: Julie Windish, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Tinley Park, Ill.; and Dr. Frank Mahuta, ASCE faculty advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 14, 2012

MSOE’s Architectural Engineering Institute student chapter took second place in the construction management category at third annual ASCE Charles Pankow Foundation Architectural Engineering Student Competition at the AEI National Student Conference in Omaha, Neb. in April.

The competition project challenged the student teams to provide a design development submittal for a new Government Office Building with significant building security requirements in Omaha along the Missouri River. The student participants were encouraged to work together in multi-disciplinary teams and consider how the engineered systems work with or enhance the architecture of the building. Space programming for the building was shown on the schematic plans. Additionally, the design submittals were required to address the challenge to integrate and optimize on a life cycle basis all major high performance attributes, including energy conservation, environment, and safety, building security, durability, accessibility, cost-benefit, productivity, sustainability, functionality and operational considerations.

Nine teams participated in the competition from the University of Nebraska, Tennessee State University, Drexel University, Kansas State University, Oklahoma State University, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Milwaukee School of Engineering and University of Wyoming.

Congratulations to the team, pictured above. Back row, left to right: Steve Reed, construction management, Glendale, Wis.; Josh Szmergalski, architectural engineering, Wauconda, Ill.; Jordan Borst, architectural engineering, Wauwatosa, Wis.; Eric Rybold, architectural engineering and construction management, Oconomowoc, Wis. Front row, left to right: Thomas Martin, architectural engineering and structural engineering, Wausau, Wis.; John Eggert, architectural engineering and construction management, Milwaukee; Jessica Phillips, architectural engineering, Freedom, Wis.; Eric Schmidt, architectural engineering and environmental engineering, Kaukauna, Wis. Not pictured: Jake Roberts, construction management, Pontiac, Ill.; and Zane Witt, architectural engineering, Albuquerque, N.M. Professor Mike McGeen was the team’s faculty advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 8, 2012

MSOE presents Great Lakers at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from May 11 through Aug. 6. Hand-selected from the collections of the Milwaukee Public Library, the exhibition features paintings, prints, photos and ephemera from Great Lakes boats of the 19th and 20th centuries. Works by such artists as Edmund Lewandowski, Robert von Neumann and Fritz Gerlach are featured alongside photos and effects from Great Lakers like the W.F. Fitzgerald, Edmund Fitzgerald, Christopher Columbus, and the Meteor, among others. Boat models by Jerry Guenther and “Working Boats” slideshows from the Wisconsin Marine Historical Society are also included in this unique display.

An opening event will take place on Friday, May 11 from 6 to 8 p.m. with guest speaker Captain Matthew Sibley, U.S. Coast Guard Commander, Sector Lake Michigan. As part of Milwaukee’s Gallery Night and Day event on July 27 from 5 to 9 p.m., the museum is hosting a Gallery talk with Peter Hirthe, president of the Wisconsin Marine Historical Society. Free admission and parking are available for both of these events.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 800 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related engineering fields.

Originally published May 5, 2012

MSOE’s groundbreaking event on May 4 kicked off construction for the new athletic field and parking complex. The event was well attended by MSOE students, faculty and staff, as well as local political dignitaries and supporters of the institution. Nearly every speaker remarked that the project will be vital to the continued growth of the university, as well as the surrounding Park East neighborhood.

Originally published May 4, 2012

The MSOE campus will be buzzing with activity this weekend. The fun kicks off Friday night at 5 p.m. with the groundbreaking ceremony for the Athletic Field and Parking Complex. Afterward, join the Theatre Troupe as they present “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” in the Todd Wehr Auditorium at 7 p.m. Admission is free with an MSOE I.D., and $5 for the general public. The production will be repeated Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m.

Concinnity XII takes place on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. There’s free admission to the sci-fi and gaming convention, which is presented by MAGE (MSOE’s Sci-fi, Gaming, Anime and Chess Club) on the third floor of the Student Life and Campus Center Building. Find a complete schedule online.

MSOE students, faculty and staff are invited to the Campus-Wide Rummage Sale from 2 to 5 p.m. in Room CC130 of the Student Life and Campus Center. Get great deals on DVDs, CDs, electronics, video games, clothing, collectibles and more!

As always, the Grohmann Museum is open on the weekend. Visit on Saturday from Noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Don’t miss the rooftop sculpture garden!

Originally published May 2, 2012

All are invited to hear Larry Korta, retired MSOE industrial engineering professor, deliver his “Last Lecture” on Thursday, May 3 at 6 p.m. in the Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway. He will give the third annual lecture in MSOE’s Last Lecture series, in which one member of the MSOE staff or faculty is invited to pass on their greatest and most succinct knowledge and life-experiences to the MSOE community. Korta, who taught at MSOE for more than 20 years, will reflect on his time at MSOE and also share his life experiences and accomplishments.

The purpose of the series is twofold: to recognize a faculty or staff member for his or her years of service and contributions to the university, and for those in attendance to learn what the speaker truly believes are the most important facets of their human life experiences and accomplishments. Students, faculty and staff have the opportunity to nominate speakers from a list of eligible individuals, and the speaker is chosen by the Student Life Office.

Korta joined MSOE as director of the industrial engineering program in 1986. Prior to that, he was employed in industry for approximately 20 years, serving in a variety of technical and administrative capacities including research, product development, quality assurance and value engineering. While at MSOE he taught a variety of industrial engineering courses, as well as Creative Thinking and Human Factors in Design for the General Studies Department. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he served as the chair of the campus-wide student retention committee.

For nine years, Korta served as coordinator of the Rockwell Automation Global Development Program, working closely with Czech Technical University in Prague. He was recognized twice by CTU for contributions to international engineering education and improving university/industry collaboration.

Korta received the Outstanding Mentor Award in 1995 and the Falk Engineering Educator Award in 1990 from MSOE. In 1995, he received the Service and Commitment Award from the Creative Education Foundation. Korta retired from MSOE in 2007, but continued to serve the university in his capacity as chair of the campus-wide student retention committee until this year.

Korta and his wife are always looking forward to the next opportunity to travel to visit their children and grandchildren around the U.S. (Atlanta to Alaska!) or to visit friends in Europe.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 26, 2012

Freshmen James Maki and Sean McGarry have declared Friday, April 27, to be St. Baldrick’s Day at Milwaukee School of Engineering. The two students put their very hairy heads together to organize a head-shaving event for their fellow Delta Sigma Phi fraternity brothers and MSOE students.

Maki and McGarry worked with members of the IE-340 Project Management class to plan and promote the event, which is designed to raise money for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The foundation funds childhood research grants across the country, and also locally at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Ten Milwaukee-area barbers from Supercuts are donating their time and talent to shave heads in the Multipurpose Room on the third floor of MSOE’s Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway. The shaving begins at 10 a.m. and Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity members will band together and lose their hair at 11 a.m.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 26, 2012

What: Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium 2012 Collegiate Rocket Competition
Where: Richard Bong State Recreation Area Runway, Parking Lot F
             (26313 Burlington Rd., Kansasville, WI 53139
When: Saturday, April 28 – 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  (Rain date: Sunday, April 29)
Parking: Ask park ranger or at visitor’s center for specific location of launch and parking
Cost: Park admission is $7 per vehicle
Launch Hotline: Call (262) 677-2249 for recorded message verifying that launch will occur.

Twenty-two teams from 14 Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa and Ohio colleges and universities will test their engineering and “rocket scientist” skills on Saturday when they compete in the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium’s Great Midwestern Regional Space Grant Student Rocket Design Competition.

Each team’s six-foot-tall rocket will soar to a minimum of 3,000 feet in the air (that’s over half of a mile). Each one-stage, high-powered rocket will, during its ascent, transmit live video from a downward looking camera to a ground receiver. The winner of the flight portion of the competition will be the team whose rocket completes a successful flight, produces the best combination of length of good video during ascent, reaches at least 3,000 feet and is recovered safely in a flyable condition. The competition will also include design analysis, oral presentation, and assessment of data results, scored by professional engineers from both academia and industry.

Teams from Milwaukee School of Engineering, UW-Madison, Marquette University, Carroll University, Ripon College, UW-La Crosse, UW-River Falls, DePaul University, University of Illinois, Iowa State, University of Minnesota, Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College (Minnesota), Lorain County Community College (Ohio) and University of Cincinnati are scheduled to compete.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 26, 2012

MSOE’s Rapid Prototyping Center helped the Chipstone Foundation create an artifact to display at the Milwaukee Art Museum (watch video of creation). The exhibit, “Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th-Century South Carolina,” features face jug vessels that were created by slaves in the Edgefield District of South Carolina. Vince Anewenter, RPC manager of operations, used 3D laser scanning to create an exact digital copy of an original face jug. Using the digital file, Anewenter and biomedical engineering student Nora Huang worked with Brian Gillis, the commissioned artist, to convert the model into a time capsule. Huang used a variety of specialized CAD softwares to manipulate the original scan file into a functional time capsule design. Using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) technology the RPC additively manufactured the actual time capsule. The nylon SLS model was then coated with .005 nickel by Repliform Inc. which will be on display at the Milwaukee Art Museum April 26-Aug. 5.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 2, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering will soon start construction of an athletic field and parking complex in the vacant Park East area adjacent to campus. On March 20, the university completed its purchase of land at the northwest corner of Broadway and Knapp St., immediately north of the Kern Center.

An official groundbreaking ceremony was held May 4, 2012.

The athletic field will be constructed on top of an in-ground, 780-car parking facility. A small, ground-level public park will be developed and maintained by MSOE. The athletic field will be used for collegiate soccer and lacrosse and youth sports. As an extension of the Kern Center, it further supports MSOE’s commitment to student wellness and development as a whole person.

This project not only benefits MSOE, but also provides an important catalyst for additional development in the Park East. It will create an attractive green space in the Park East and provide much-needed parking, both of which will prove beneficial for other commercial development.

The $30 million project will have a significant impact on the Park East Corridor, as the first major development of its kind in the area. The development is largely supported with a very generous donation from Drs. Robert and Patricia Kern. Uihlein-Wilson Architects are the project developers.

Impact on downtown Milwaukee
MSOE’s investment will provide an important catalyst for additional development in the Park East area. Approximately 150 people will be employed during the construction of the facility. It creates an attractive green space and provides much-needed parking, both of which are likely to prove attractive for other commercial development. Of the 780 parking spaces, approximately 500 may be leased to business and the public, thereby generating taxable revenue. There also will be space for a small restaurant and/or coffee house adjacent to the park in the lower levels of the parking facility, offering potential for additional tax revenue.

This project will provide shared parking opportunities for the Park East area, while maintaining the existing street grid with an accessible, contemporary construction design. The development will serve as an attractive addition that provides much-needed green space and parking in the area and creates an inviting amenity that complements the urban residential and retail mix prescribed for the area.

About the Kerns
Drs. Robert and Patricia Kern founded Generac Power Systems of Waukesha, Wis. in 1959 out of their garage with one employee, and grew it into a 2,000-person operation with a number of facilities in Wisconsin, the Midwest and overseas. The company produces generators for industrial and consumer markets. The Kerns sold the business in 2006. They are longtime supporters of MSOE and benefactors of MSOE’s scholarship programs. Through their phenomenal support of the Kern Center, which opened in 2004, the Kerns have provided first-class wellness, exercise and sports facilities for all MSOE students, alumni, faculty and staff. Robert Kern has served the university as a member of the Board of Regents since 1992, and he holds an Honorary Doctor of Engineering from MSOE. Patricia Kern holds an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from MSOE.

Originally published April 20, 2012

High school students and their parents are invited to MSOE’s Open House on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. They’ll experience first-hand the warm atmosphere and high-tech learning offered by the university. During the Open House, attendees can:

  • Tour the sophisticated labs where students get the ‘application of theory’ experience that makes them worth so much when they graduate.
  • Learn about some of the great activities students take part in, such as intramural sports, orchestra, servant leadership, professional organizations, student government and gaming.
  • Meet faculty and speak one-on-one with a counselor.

To register for the Open House, please call (800) 332-6763, email explore@msoe.edu, or Schedule a Campus Visit.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 16, 2012

MSOE’s annual Health and Wellness Fair will be Thursday, April 19, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the MSOE Kern Center. This FREE community event will include more than 70 booths with free or low-cost health screening tests ($6 cholesterol screening), give-aways, healthy snacks, live demos, mini massages and information on preventative, environmental and holistic health, exercise, cardiac and cancer awareness and much more. Aurora Vision Center is featuring a vision acuity test, eyeglass adjustments, and more than 800 frames to try.  Additionally, April is National Oral Cancer Awareness Month and free screenings will be offered.  Also The Health and Wellness Fair is for adults of any age or stage of life.

The Health and Wellness Fair is sponsored by MSOE Health Services, MSOE School of Nursing and WPS. For information, contact MSOE Health Services, (414) 277-7590 or health@msoe.edu. A complete schedule of events can be found online at www.msoe.edu/healthfair.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 12, 2012

Matthew S. Levatich, president and chief operating officer of Harley-Davidson Motor Company, has been named to the MSOE Board of Regents.

Levatich joined Harley-Davidson in 1994 and has held positions of increasing responsibility in the U.S. and Europe, including vice president and general manager of the Motor Company’s Parts and Accessories business, vice president of materials management, and president and managing director of MV Agusta.

Prior to joining Harley-Davidson, Levatich held positions with FMC Corporation and Albany International Corporation in engineering and in manufacturing management.

Levatich holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and master’s degrees in Business Administration and Engineering Management from Northwestern University.  He currently serves on Northwestern University’s Board for the Master of Management and Manufacturing Program.  He also serves on the Board of Trustees for the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design.

MSOE’s Board of Regents governs the operations and the future planning of the university. The mutual benefit that results from the relationship between corporations and the university would not be possible were it not for strong leadership. This value-added synergy is a hallmark of MSOE.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 11, 2012

Kailey Lietzke, architectural engineering/construction management freshman and Turner Swanson, mechanical engineering sophomore have been named Academic All American by the National Collegiate Bowling Coaches Association. Lietzke and Swanson are members of the MSOE Bowling Club. To be selected to the NCBCA team, a bowler must be a United States Bowling Congress collegiate athlete who has a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50 based on a 4.00 scale.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 9, 2012

Blake Wentz, assistant professor and construction management program director in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, received the Mechanical Contractors Association of America’s (MCAA) 2011 Educator of the Year Award. Wentz is also the MCAA Student Chapter advisor at MSOE.

MCAA President Mark Rogers (left) and Career Development Committee Chairman Brett Christiansen (right) presented the award to Wentz (center) at MCAA’s annual convention. The committee chose Wentz for his mentoring ability, industry knowledge and involvement, and active participation in Student Chapter Program activities. Perhaps the best proof of his outstanding abilities is the success of the MCAA Student Chapter at MSOE, which won the 2010-2011 MCAA Student Chapter Competition and made the finals for this year’s competition.

MCAA serves the unique needs of approximately 2,500 firms involved in heating, air conditioning, refrigeration, plumbing, piping and mechanical service. MCAA provides members with high-quality educational materials and programs to help them attain the highest level of managerial and technical expertise. MCAA includes the Mechanical Service Contractors of America, the Plumbing Contractors of America, the Manufacturer/Supplier Council, the Mechanical Contracting Education and Research Foundation and the National Certified Pipe Welding Bureau.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 4, 2012

Whether you’re a high school student looking for the perfect college, or an adult ready to continue your studies, Milwaukee School of Engineering is the place for you.

Continuing Studies Information Session
On Monday, April 16 from 5 to 6:30 p.m., MSOE’s Center for Continuing Studies and Outreach is holding an information session. MSOE the perfect place for adult students to prepare themselves for a new future. To accommodate the busy lifestyles of adult students, MSOE offers degrees during evenings and weekends, and through blended Internet courses.

There are a number of undergraduate degree programs for those with an associate degree or prior college experience, as well as graduate degrees and professional development courses. All classes are taught by MSOE faculty (not teaching assistants) and meet one evening per week for 11 weeks. In addition, the university offers courses taught in blended, Internet-hybrid format featuring face-to-face class meetings in alternating weeks.

MSOE’s Continuing Studies programs enroll hundreds of individuals in graduate, undergraduate or professional development courses each quarter. These adults continue their education to advance their careers, stabilize their employment, increase their marketability, increase their earning potential and stay on the cutting edge in their discipline.

Open House
High school students and their parents are invited to MSOE’s Open House on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. They’ll experience first-hand the warm atmosphere and high-tech learning offered by the university. During the Open House, attendees can:

  • Tour the sophisticated labs where students get the ‘application of theory’ experience that makes them worth so much when they graduate.
  • Learn about some of the great activities students take part in, such as intramural sports, orchestra, servant leadership, professional organizations, student government and gaming.
  • Meet faculty and speak one-on-one with a counselor.

To register for the Open House, please call (800) 332-6763, email explore@msoe.edu, or Schedule a Campus Visit.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 2, 2012

MSOE’s student chapter of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) was the Class 2 recipient of the 2011 SAE Honeywell Outstanding Collegiate Branch Award. This award recognizes SAE Collegiate Branches for exemplary performance in the areas of technical meetings, networking opportunities, Collegiate Design Series competitions, promoting SAE membership and community service programs.

The group will be recognized during the SAE 2012 World Congress in April in Detroit where they will receive an $850 award. Chapter officers are Paul Gessler, chairperson; Marshall Schaeffer, vice chairperson; Patrick Comiskey, treasurer; Meghan Krause, secretary; Charlie Scanlon, program coordinator; Jim Day, fundraising coordinator; Alex Zelhofer, senior design liaison; and Mike Ajax, webmaster. Dr. Christopher Damm is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 13, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering students won first place in five events and finished in second or third place in 10 other categories at the annual Wisconsin Future Business Leaders of America / Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA/PBL) Conference held March 10-11 in Madison, Wis.

The state conference and competitions served as a qualifying round for the FBLA/PBL National Conference to be held in June in San Antonio. By virtue of placing first or second in their events, all 10 of the MSOE students competing at the state conference qualified for the national competitions this summer. Students earning third place awards are considered national competition alternates.

This year’s event marked MSOE Rader School of Business’ sixth year of competition at the state level. Competitive events included both written examinations and judged demonstrations in business and information technology subjects. The following students qualified to compete at the FBLA/PBL National Conference:

1st Place: Sports Management
Sid Bickle, Management Information Systems

1st Place: Telecommunications
Garrick Jannene, International Business

1st Place: Marketing Concepts / 2nd Place: Management Principles
Steve Luecht, Business Management

1st Place: Business Communication / 3rd Place: Macroeconomics
John von Helms, Mechanical Engineering

1st Place: Project Management / 2nd Place: Business Law
Mollie Zuberbier, International Business

2nd Place: Cyber Security / 3rd Place: Contemporary Sports
Jake Larson, Management Information Systems

2nd Place: Impromptu Speaking / 3rd Place: International Business
Henry Luecht, International Business

2nd Place: Microeconomics
Spencer Rode, Business Management

2nd Place: Project Management
Samantha Thorn, Business Management

2nd Place: International Business
Carly Uuskallio, Management Information Systems

More than 100 college students attended this year’s state conference and competitions. The 10 students representing MSOE are members of the university’s Phi Beta Lambda Chapter, a student organization open to all MSOE majors. Several Midwest business schools were represented at the state event including UW-Madison, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Whitewater, UW-Green Bay and University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. The Rader School of Business has been affiliated with FBLA/PBL since 2006. Dr. Michael Payne, assistant professor, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 13, 2012

Two athletes at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) have helped the university gain the first ever, back-to-back national honor of having Academic All-Americans in the same sport.

Carol Cayo was named the Capital One Academic All-America of the Year for Division III women’s basketball (the only one in the country). Cayo, from Lake Mills, Wis., is a senior majoring in industrial engineering. Last year, Austin Meier, from Oshkosh, Wis., received the same honor for men’s basketball. Meier will graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering and a master’s degree in structural engineering.

This is the first time in the history of this prestigious award, which has been granted by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) since 1952, that one university or college has received the honor two years in a row for the same sport.

Cayo was also named Player of the Year for the Northern Athletics Conference. Meier received the same honor last year – making this another back-to-back win for MSOE!

MSOE has had a very strong academic reputation throughout its 109 year history, but the basketball program hasn’t been as strong. This begs the question of why these standout athletes, who could have chosen to play basketball at nearly any university, chose to attend MSOE and play Division III basketball.

“MSOE had the best balance of everything that I was looking for in college. First, there were a limited number of colleges that offered my specific major, in addition to being a place where I could make a significant contribution to the basketball team,” said Meier. “Given the fact MSOE is located in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, it allowed for small classes with a big city atmosphere. Overall, it had the best of what I was looking for in all my ‘college categories.’”

“When looking at colleges I was definitely more concerned with finding a strong academic school rather than just a place where I could play sports. Luckily, MSOE offered both,” said Cayo. “I was really impressed with the extensive lab experiences for students, the high placement rates and starting salaries, and small class sizes. MSOE’s Kern Center, an amazing athletic facility, also helped finalize my decision.”

Both athletes are involved in activities off the court and outside of the classroom. Meier is a member of Tau Beta Pi, the national engineering honor society. Cayo is secretary of Tau Beta Pi, a member of the Institute for Industrial Engineers, and a recipient of the prestigious MSOE Presidential Scholarship.

Meier and Cayo both have jobs lined up for after graduation this spring. Meier will move to Lenexa, Kan., to work as a structural engineer for Kiewit Power Engineers. Cayo will join Epic in Verona, Wis. as an implementation consultant/project manager.

Originally published March 13, 2012

MSOE’s Winter Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

 

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published March 4, 2012

Junior forward Jordan Keizer scored at the 5:09 mark of overtime as the No. 10 Raiders beat No. 6 Adrian 4-3 to win the Midwest Collegiate Hockey Association Harris Cup and clinch their first berth in the Division III Championship. The tournament begins Wednesday with the first round. For MSOE (22-6-1), it’s their first Harris Cup title since the 2005-06. Also, the Raiders set a new program record for wins with 22.

Jordan Keizer was named MVP of the tournament while sophomore forward Kevin Medina, junior defenseman Carl Lindblad and senior goalie Connor Toomey were selected to the All-Tournament Team.

MSOE got off to a quick start as senior forward Kyle Smith found the back of the net at the 2:40 mark of the first period. Less than two minutes later, sophomore forward Kevin Medina made it 2-0 Raiders with a tally set up by sophomore defenseman Devin Schmitt. Adrian’s Ryan Lowe pulled the Bulldogs within one a little over three minutes later.

Adrian tied the game in the second period when Jordan Watts logged a power play goal at the 1:38 mark of the period. The next goal would come in the third period as Jordan Keizer put MSOE up 3-2 just past the halfway mark in that period. For Jordan Keizer, it was his 100th career point in his 82nd game. The assists went to freshman defenseman Logan Bauman and freshman forward Josh Keizer. The Bulldogs once again tied the game with a goal from Shelby Gray.

In overtime, Jordan Keizer sealed the conference title with his 23rd goal of the year. Junior forward Bradley Tierney was credited with the lone assist. Jordan Keizer now has seven game-winning goals on the year which is tied for the most in the country. Toomey made 35 saves for his 22th win of the year.

The Raiders have won three straight games in overtime when including the mini-game double overtime victory against Lake Forest last Sunday in the MCHA First Round. Adrian outshot MSOE 38-35 in the game. The teams were a combined 1-12 on the power play with the Bulldogs getting the only goal with an advantage.

Originally published February 28, 2012

Model railroad buffs, families and children will want to make tracks to the MSOE campus this weekend for the annual Train Time show, featuring operating model railroad layouts, vendors and displays. One of the largest shows of its kind, Train Time is presented by MSOE’s student-run chapter of the Society of Model Engineers (S.O.M.E.).

Train Time is a free event and takes place Saturday, March 3, and Sunday, March 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the first floor of the Student Life and Campus Center, 1025. N. Broadway. Limited free parking is available in the lot and Broadway and Highland Ave.

S.O.M.E. promotes the practical application of engineering and technology through the design, construction and operation of a large HO-scale model railroads. Members are involved in railroad history and research, construction methods, electrical systems and computer design.

Train Time 2012 will feature many operating layouts and displays from exhibitors and vendors including: Badgerland S-Gaugers, Cedar Creek Central Railroad Club, Fond Du Lac Society of Model Railroad Hobbyists, Jordan Emmett, Kalmbach Publishing Company, Leather Railroad, Lionel Railroad Club of Milwaukee, Little WISE, Guys and Gals, L. J. Schmit Enterprise, METRO Model Railroad Club, Milwaukee Area NTrak (MANTrak), Milwaukee Electric Railway & Transit Historical Society, Milwaukee Light Engineering Society, Milwaukee N Southeastern, Ltd., Milwaukee Transit Archives & Museum, Model Railroad Club of Milwaukee, Overland Western Lines, Paul Brammer’s Railroad Goods, Sommerfeld’s Trains, Southeastern Wisconsin Ntrak Group, Stadelmann Engineering Inc., Stu Baker Alumni Layout, The Pewaukee Road Lego Train Club, The Wisconsin Electric Railway Historical Society, Inc., Waukesha County Gandy Dancers, and Wisconsin Association of Railroad Passengers. (Groups attending subject to change.)

Originally published February 27, 2012

Brent Wiedenfeld, of Franklin, Wis., graduated with honors from Milwaukee School of Engineering on Feb. 25, 2012. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business and a minor in operations management. Students who graduate with honors have achieved a cumulative grade point average between 3.20 and 3.69.

Wiedenfeld received the MSOE Alumni Association Award for Student Achievement. The award is given to a student who has made time in his or her hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

Wiedenfeld’s internship experience includes working at Country Thunder USA where he managed pre-planning and logistics to ensure the execution of great customer experiences during this music festival where the average attendance was 30,000 per day. He represented Country Thunder in negotiations with the Twin Lakes, Wis., city council where he was able to obtain event permits within the budget given him.

Prior to that experience, Wiedenfeld was a dining room supervisor and host at Tudor Oaks Retirement Community in Muskego, Wis. It was his responsibility to ensure good customer experiences, provide solutions for customer problems, and keep schedules on track.

In addition, as a volunteer, Wiedenfeld helped raise over $13,000 for Kapco Charitable Challenge. With this solid background, Wiedenfeld’s post-MSOE plans are to use his business degree to land a professional career in event planning.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 23, 2012

More than 50 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Winter Commencement, Saturday, Feb. 25, at 10 a.m. at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from Charles F. James, Jr., Ph.D., P.E., MSOE Corporation member and former MSOE vice president of academics. Dr. James also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree.

Joseph R. Blanchard is the class respondent. Blanchard is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Information Systems. Brent Wiedenfeld, who is graduating with honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Business, will receive the Alumni Association Award. The award which is given to a student who has made time in his or her hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

About Dr. James:
Dr. James joined MSOE in 1995 as the vice president of academics and served in that position until his retirement in 2000. Since 2001, he has been an MSOE Corporation member. James holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, master’s degree in industrial engineering and Ph.D. in engineering, all from Purdue University.

When James joined MSOE he had in excess of 35 years of professional experience. This included national and international activity in industrial and academic engineering (research, consulting, and academic administration plus arbitration of labor-management disputes). He held several positions in Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers including president of the Milwaukee Chapter. He received the Outstanding Educators of America Award, Eminent Engineer Award from Tau Beta Pi, Silver Medal from Technical University of Budapest and State of Wisconsin Outstanding Professional Engineer in Education Award. He is past-president of Engineers and Scientists of Milwaukee (now known as STEM Forward). He holds life membership in the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and has held numerous positions in American Society of Engineering Education.

As dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at UW-Milwaukee, James negotiated and signed collaborative agreements between UWM and universities in China, Hungary, Czech Republic, Egypt, Mexico, England and Scotland.

James was the C. Paul Stocker Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Ohio University in 1982-83. He also served in faculty positions at University of Rhode Island (chairman of industrial engineering), University of Massachusetts, Purdue University and Massey University (New Zealand).

He was a senior engineer at McDonnell Aircraft and has served as a consultant to numerous educational institutions, companies and organizations both in the United States and abroad. James was well-known for his business, education and community involvement in the Milwaukee area. He served 16 years on the Board of Directors of Badger Meter Inc. in Milwaukee.

James is a Registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin and retains his membership in Institute of Industrial Engineers. He is also still active as an FMCS arbitrator. He is listed in current editions of “Who’s Who in America,” “Who’s Who in the World” and was listed in approximately 15 other listing services.

James, with co-investigators, is responsible for significant research accomplishments in metal cutting tools and in robotics research, both at University of Rhode Island where he was co-founder of the Robotics Research Center. He spent several months in India as consultant for Asian Productivity Organization (Japan), providing extensive manufacturing assistance to five major Indian industries and also gave several lectures on operations research and other areas.

James and his wife Mollie now reside in Excelsior Springs, Mo. They have an adult daughter and two adult sons plus seven grandchildren. They enjoy a wide variety of animals on their small Missouri farm.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 22, 2012

MILWAUKEE –  MSOE senior center Carol Cayo (Lake Mills, Wis./Lake Mills) has been named Capital One Academic All-America of the Year for Division III women’s basketball. The honor comes after being a standout academic athlete for her entire career at the national and district levels.

This marks the second straight year that an MSOE basketball player has earned this honor.  Austin Meier was selected as the College Division Academic All-America of the Year during the 2011-12 season.  Cayo is the 10th CoSida Academic All American recipient at MSOE and the third to be named to the first team. No other school has ever had back-to-back recipients of this prestigious award.

This season, Cayo is also a member of the Academic All-America First Team, and last season, she was part of the Academic All-America Second Team. She has been named to Academic All-District First Teams for three straight seasons. Cayo is an industrial engineering major at Milwaukee School of Engineering and carries a 3.98 grade point average. College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) recognizes the nation’s top student-athletes with this award for their combined performance, both athletic and academic in nature.

Academically, Cayo is actively involved in the Institute for Industrial Engineers and received the UPS Service Scholarship for outstanding academic achievement and leadership at the undergraduate level in 2011-12. Cayo is also a recipient of the prestigious MSOE Presidential Scholarship and secretary for Tau Beta Pi, the national engineering honor society.

Just recently, Cayo reached the 1,500-point plateau and moved to second in the MSOE women’s basketball all-time scoring list. Also this year, she became the first player in Northern Athletics Conference (NAC) history to reach 1,000 rebounds in a career. She is the all-time leader in rebounds and blocks in NAC and MSOE history. Cayo was named First Team All-NAC the past two seasons and was selected NAC Freshman of the Year during the 2008-09 season.

Cayo has helped the Raiders set a new program record for overall wins (16) and conference victories (11) this season. MSOE finished second in the South Division of the NAC with an 11-6 record in conference games and will be the third seed in the NAC Tournament. The Raiders will host Concordia-Chicago, the sixth seed in a NAC Quarterfinal game, Wednesday, February 22, at 7 p.m. in Milwaukee.

Originally published February 20, 2012

The sixth annual MSOE Business Plan Competition ended in a tie for first place. Sharing the top prize are: The Notebook, an online company developing innovative services for college students, and Xeratec, a start-up property development business focused on environmentally sustainable building renovation in downtown Milwaukee. These two teams will represent MSOE at the Mason-Wells BizStarts Collegiate Business Plan Competition, a regional competition among 21 universities in southeastern Wisconsin that will be held at MSOE’s Todd Wehr Auditorium on April 26.

The competition began earlier this school year when students and alumni were invited to present their business ideas. More than 125 students entered the competition. Eighteen teams were asked to submit full business plans and advance in the competition, and five winners were chosen.

The MSOE Business Plan Competition is sponsored annually by MSOE’s Uihlein/Spitzer Center for Entrepreneurship and supported by MSOE’s Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network (KEEN) project grant. Dr. Jeffrey Blessing, professor, Rader School of Business, serves as Kern Fellow and competition coordinator. Business plans are sought from MSOE students and alumni.

The 2012 MSOE Business Plan Winners were:

1st Place Tie ($1,750 each)
The Notebook
Victor Bande, Industrial Engineering
Max Poeske, Biomedical Engineering
Jaren Singh, Business Management

The Notebook is an online company devoted to developing innovative services and web applications for university students through social networking platforms. The company mission is to make students’ tasks simpler, saving time and money in a number of aspects of their daily life by providing personalized, relevant information. This “all-in-one” experience is offered through four applications. The two primary services are the study materials network and the online book exchange. The two secondary applications are the professor rank and online food directory. The goal of the primary services is to attract and obtain users whereas the secondary services will keep users active and enhance their experience.

Xeratec
Andrew Hillstrom, Architectural Engineering & Construction Management
Keith Kumpula, Architectural Engineering & Construction Management

Xeratec is a property development company with a proposed renovation project called the Underwriters Exchange. An existing structure is currently being utilized for office space. It has greater than 50 percent vacancy and commercial and residential zoning. The redeveloped structure would consist of residential apartment spaces, floors 1-9, and a first floor office space. All units would be rented as a mix of studio/efficiency, single, and two bedroom apartments. The market for apartments in downtown Milwaukee is currently 94 to 96 percent occupancy level.

3rd Place ($1,000)
IV AutoChill
Kyle Ewert, Biomedical Engineering
Kate Herrmann, Biomedical Engineering
Jeff Sugar, Biomedical Engineering
Lindsey Youngs, Biomedical Engineering

IV AutoChill is a medical device that induces therapeutic hypothermia, which combines intravenous and surface cooling to create the most efficient cooling system possible. Therapeutic hypothermia, or the controlled reduction of core body temperature, has been proven to increase the survival rate of patients who have experienced temporary loss of circulation brought about by conditions such as sudden cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury and stroke—three very common medical emergencies.

4th Place ($500)
Erik’s LLC
Erik Winer, Electrical Engineering

Erik’s LLC is a diverse company comprised of a number of different entities, each recognized by the local community of Marshfield, Wis. With business roots over a decade deep, Erik’s LLC is established within the lawn maintenance industry, produce growth and distribution industry, and most recently, the plant retail industry. Erik’s LLC is a strong coalition of the following entities: Erik’s Chore Service LLC, Good Earth Produce LLC, and Mill Creek Gardens LLC. Erik’s LLC works each day to maintain a proud and industrious name through each of the represented entities under its title.

5th Place ($250)
Peripheral Neuropathy Device
Brandan Fajardo, Biomedical Engineering
Michael Robertson, Biomedical Engineering
Christa Staudy, Biomedical Engineering
Kevin Zimmerman, Biomedical Engineering

The Peripheral Neuropathy Device provides a more convenient, efficient and accurate way of diagnosing and assessing peripheral neuropathy. The device integrates existing thermal, vibration and force tests. It is a patient-controlled device minimizing need for doctor administration. Peripheral neuropathy is a slow progressing disease that damages the peripheral nervous system, which connects the limbs and extremities to the brain and spinal cord. Diabetics make up 43 percent of the total 20 million peripheral neuropathy patients. There is no cure for peripheral neuropathy, only treatments to alleviate the symptoms.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 15, 2012

More than 50 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Winter Commencement, Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from Charles F. James, Jr., Ph.D., P.E., MSOE Corporation member and former MSOE vice president of academics. He will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree as well.

About Dr. James:
Dr. Charles F. James, Jr. joined MSOE in 1995 as the vice president of academics and served in that position until his retirement in 2000. Since 2001, he has been an MSOE Corporation member. James holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, master’s degree in industrial engineering and Ph.D. in engineering, all from Purdue University.

When James joined MSOE he had in excess of 35 years of professional experience. This included national and international activity in industrial and academic engineering (research, consulting, and academic administration plus arbitration of labor-management disputes). He held several positions in Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers including president of the Milwaukee Chapter. He received the Outstanding Educators of America Award, Eminent Engineer Award from Tau Beta Pi, Silver Medal from Technical University of Budapest and State of Wisconsin Outstanding Professional Engineer in Education Award. He is past-president of Engineers and Scientists of Milwaukee (now known as STEM Forward). He holds life membership in the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and has held numerous positions in American Society of Engineering Education.

As dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at UW-Milwaukee, James negotiated and signed collaborative agreements between UWM and universities in China, Hungary, Czech Republic, Egypt, Mexico, England and Scotland.

James was the C. Paul Stocker Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Ohio University in 1982-83. He also served in faculty positions at University of Rhode Island (chairman of industrial engineering), University of Massachusetts, Purdue University and Massey University (New Zealand).

He was a senior engineer at McDonnell Aircraft and has served as a consultant to numerous educational institutions, companies and organizations both in the United States and abroad. James was well-known for his business, education and community involvement in the Milwaukee area. He served 16 years on the Board of Directors of Badger Meter Inc. in Milwaukee.

James is a Registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin and retains his membership in Institute of Industrial Engineers. He is also still active as an FMCS arbitrator. He is listed in current editions of “Who’s Who in America,” “Who’s Who in the World” and was listed in approximately 15 other listing services.

James, with co-investigators, is responsible for significant research accomplishments in metal cutting tools and in robotics research, both at University of Rhode Island where he was co-founder of the Robotics Research Center. He spent several months in India as consultant for Asian Productivity Organization (Japan), providing extensive manufacturing assistance to five major Indian industries and also gave several lectures on operations research and other areas.

James and his wife Mollie now reside in Excelsior Springs, Mo. They have an adult daughter and two adult sons plus seven grandchildren. They enjoy a wide variety of animals on their small Missouri farm.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 15, 2012

A team of architectural engineering and construction management students from Milwaukee School of Engineering won the Preconstruction National Championship at the 25th annual Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) Student Competition. Congratulations to the Preconstruction Team, which was coached by Dr. Jeong Woo, assistant professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department. Team members are:

  • Matt Bakke, construction management major, Elkhart Lake, Wis.
  • Chris Dublinski, construction management major, Naperville, Ill.
  • Jared Gothard, construction management major, Long Grove, Ill.
  • Josh Halvorsen (team captain), architectural engineering and construction management double major, West Dundee, Ill.
  • Cate Scholfield, construction management major, Wausau, Wis.
  • Nick Zamorski, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Waukesha, Wis.
  • Theodore Bulinski (alternate), construction management major, Minneapolis
  • Bryan Makatura (alternate), construction management major, Pen Argyle, Penn.

Since entering the competition in 1999, MSOE has had 17 top three places in national student competitions and eight national championship teams. No other university in the country has experienced the consistent level of success demonstrated by MSOE.

To win, MSOE competed against several universities, including Arizona State University, Auburn University, Boise State University, Brigham Young University, Colorado State University, Cal Poly, University of Southern California and Washington State.

This year’s preconstruction problem was sponsored by PCL Construction Inc. Students were challenged to prepare a preconstruction proposal for $200 million Ritz Carlton Ski Resort in Veil, Colo. The team was required to submit three proposals including Phase I Prequalification, Phase II CM Proposal and Phase III Oral Presentation. These proposals included the construction estimate, schedule, site logistics plan, safety plan, constructability analysis and BIM solutions. PCL Construction judging panelists commented on the great job MSOE students on all evaluation criteria and the high caliber of students from MSOE at the competition. One of the judges commented that, “The MSOE team is the Yankees of Preconstruction.”

Bob Lemke, associate professor; Blake Wentz, assistant professor; and Larry Palank, adjunct professor, all in MSOE’s Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, helped the team by serving as critics. Alex Schmude ’11 CM, and GE Johnson mentored the team. The Walsh Group, Blake Wentz and Bill Scholfield provided financial support which allowed MSOE students to compete in the national competition this year.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 14, 2012

MSOE presents H.D. Tylle: Touring Germany and Working in Wisconsin at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from Feb. 17 through April 22. German artist Hans Dieter Tylle has spent more than 30 years painting industry, working on location in steel mills, salt mines, foundries, manufacturing facilities and others, creating paintings of industry in both the United States and Europe. As one of the world’s premiere industrial painters, Tylle does not simply document industry. Rather, he celebrates industrial achievement, examines the relationship between man and machine, and pays homage to the businessperson’s entrepreneurial spirit.

After spending the greater part of 2000-09 working in the United States (during which he created works for MSOE and the Grohmann Museum), Tylle returned to Germany for a focused two year project: Touring Germany, when he painted for companies like BASF, BMW and Merck.  This exhibition brings together these recent works with those done previously for local industries such as Charter Manufacturing, Kondex Corp., Pieper Power, and Michels Corp.

As part of Milwaukee’s Gallery Night and Day event on Friday, April 20 from 5 to 9 p.m., the museum is hosting a closing reception with Tylle.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 800 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related engineering fields.

Originally published February 13, 2012

MSOE architectural engineering students have designed and built a rainwater collection system at Cream City Gardens, an urban garden collaboration between the Guest House of Milwaukee and Friedens Community Ministries. Cream City Gardens will utilize the rainwater collection system to expand its existing garden system.

“I’m happy to have a community partner like MSOE invested in the Cream City Gardens project,” said Cindy Krahenbuhl, executive director of the Guest House of Milwaukee. “The rainwater collection system will not only conserve water and save energy, but it will also allow our Cream City Gardens project to grow, providing more produce for Guest House’s homeless individuals.”

The rainwater collection system consists of one 250 gallon tank and four 50 gallon barrels surrounded by a protective shed. The students will receive project management course credit for bringing the project to fruition. The project was made possible through MSOE’s Office of Servant-Leadership, which received a three-year Brady Corporation Foundation Inc. grant to exercise the tenants of Servant-Leadership through MSOE’s project management courses. Brady Corp. is providing financial and intellectual capital for Rader School of Business students to learn project management theory while engendering projects benefitting the greater Milwaukee community.

Click here to watch the Fox 6 news story about the project.

Since 1982, the Guest House has been creating solutions to homelessness in Milwaukee. The Guest House serves men in its emergency shelter with transitional housing programs, and serves men, women, and families in its permanent supportive housing programs. The Cream City Gardens project seeks to provide skills and experiences that will make participants in the garden more desirable as employees, improve the nourishment of the clients we serve and of those in the greater community, and build a neighborhood that will be more attractive to residents, community organizations, and businesses alike.

The Guest House and Friedens Community Ministries are United Way Partner Agencies. This project is just one of many that the United Way has identified at its partner agencies that will benefit the disadvantaged in the community, and also help students exercise the tenants of Servant-Leadership.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 9, 2012

Members of MSOE’s National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) student chapter are preparing for the Green Energy Challenge, which is the 4th Annual NECA/EI (ELECTRI International) Student Chapter Competition. They are one of eighteen NECA Student Chapters across the country that are participating in the 2012 challenge. This year, teams will select a facility on their campus, conduct an energy audit of the building’s power and lighting systems, and design and propose a retrofit for both systems. MSOE’s team is focusing on the Walter Schroeder Library.

The team is hoping to continue their winning streak this year, as they’ve won the championship the past two years. Assistant Professor Dr. Dudley Outcalt is the faculty advisor for MSOE’s NECA student chapter, and members Nicholas Cote, Christopher Kneeland, Courtney Leaf, Brittany Leis, Tonya Otto, Elise Pinkerton, Dylan Sandretto and Derek Underdahl will be representing MSOE.

ELECTRI International’s jury — contractors and industry partners — will judge each written entry and select three finalist teams to bring to the NECA 2012 Convention in Las Vegas for oral presentations. They are also encouraged to use NECAWORKS™ – a web-based energy and economic screening tool — which will be made available to all students participating in the 2012 Green Energy Challenge.

Read more about last year’s project.

Originally published February 1, 2012

Marshfield (Wis.) High School won the Wisconsin regional championship in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Science Bowl® for high school students held Jan. 28 at MSOE. The winning team, comprised of Alma Farooque, Jack Gellerman, Laura Josephson, Michael Josephson, Rahul Pathak and Coach Paul Herder, advances to Washington, D.C., to compete against 68 other regional winners at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl® from April 26-30. This is the third year in a row that Herder coached the regional championship team and is travelling to Washington.

Second place went to Alec Entress, Sam Gaspar, Alex Peterson, Paul Scheid, Jeff Wiltgen and Coach J.R. Collier from Marquette University High School, Milwaukee.

Stoughton (Wis.) High School finished in third place. Matthew Gharrity, Cayley Reif, Nathan Sullivan, Timothy Tyson and Coach Cindy Carter were on the team.

Twenty teams of high school science and math students from Wisconsin competed. Many of these teams spent months preparing for the National Science Bowl’s regional competition, which features head-to-head competition in a fast-paced question and answer format similar to the popular television game show, “Jeopardy.” The students were quizzed on all science disciplines including biology, chemistry, earth and science, physics and astronomy, as well as math. Most questions are so challenging many scientists would have trouble finding an answer.

In 2012, 15,000 high school sophomores, juniors and seniors across the United States will compete.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published February 1, 2012

MSOE is offering its new graduates a tremendous opportunity: the MSOE Graduate Tuition Grant.

“MSOE students now have an amazing opportunity to earn their master’s degree without paying graduate tuition,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “With master’s degrees becoming the norm, we want to see our students reach their fullest potential in industry.”

The Graduate Tuition Grant is just the latest way MSOE is making its education programs more student-centered. It expands on the university’s academic guarantees, which began in 1995 and were likely the first of their kind. MSOE is committed to its undergraduate students and preparing them for their careers in a timely fashion. By offering the Graduate Tuition Grant, a Four-Year Graduation Guarantee, and allowing graduates to re-take undergraduate classes, students who enroll at MSOE can be confident their educational investment will pay off.

Free graduate tuition
MSOE graduates enjoy tremendous success securing jobs once they graduate, but for those who would prefer to immediately continue their education and receive a master’s degree, the university has an incredible offer: the MSOE Graduate Tuition Grant. With this new grant, MSOE bachelor’s degree graduates can earn a master’s degree from MSOE without paying tuition, as long as they meet certain criteria. Read more about this exciting opportunity at http://www.msoe.edu/gtg. Some employment sectors now desire a master’s degree in addition to a bachelor’s degree for their new hires. This offer enables MSOE graduates to be exclusively prepared for these specialized employment opportunities.

The MSOE Four-Year Graduation Guarantee
Since 1995, MSOE has guaranteed to all students who start and stay on track in their chosen degree, that all classes needed to graduate in four years will be available to them when they need them.

Re-take classes
Not every student realizes the importance of every class they took as an undergraduate. The MSOE guarantee is further strengthened by the university’s offer to allow graduates to refresh their knowledge of any undergraduate course they successfully completed at MSOE by re-taking it, free of charge, within three years of graduation. This is a guarantee of sorts to employers, as well. They invest a great deal in new hires and are confident that MSOE graduates are well worth their investment.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 30, 2012

Trees and light poles all around MSOE’s campus are donning purple ribbons this week. MSOE’s new Colleges Against Cancer student organization is sponsoring Cancer Awareness Week from Jan. 30 to Feb. 3. The group has planned a series of events for the week, and any money raised will be donated to the Milwaukee Relay for Life event this spring, which supports the American Cancer Society.

All MSOE students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in Cancer Awareness Week activities, which take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the third floor of the Student Life and Campus Center.

Monday, Jan. 30: T-Shirt Sale
Tuesday, Jan. 31: Great American Smoke Out – get a cold turkey sandwich for quitting smoking “cold turkey”
Wednesday, Feb. 1: Blood Pressure Clinic –MSOE nursing students will check your blood pressure for free. Participates will be entered to win one of three restaurant gift cards
Thursday, Feb. 2: General Cancer Awareness Day – Buy a luminary or a relay foot to remember someone who has been affected by cancer
Friday, Feb. 3: Free Cupcakes – Enjoy free cupcakes and celebrate more birthdays for everyone

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 31, 2012

Students in the MS-3411 “Leading Project Teams” course have been learning the techniques of studying, analyzing, improving, managing and leading the growth, productivity and development of individual and group competencies to enhance project performance. A key component of the course is developing the students’ leadership skills through the tenets of servant-leadership:

  • increased service to others
  • an approach to work that emphasizes the healthy organic and functional relations between humanity and vocational/occupational objectives
  • sharing of power in decision making

Kristin Shebesta, adjunct associate professor, has focused on developing the students’ individual leadership skills and encouraging them to transform the people they are serving with their projects. The students have planned events that will involve humanity and help those who are involved grow and learn.

One of the teams is creating a “Macaroni Mountain” in the Student Life and Campus Center by collecting boxes of pasta from MSOE students, faculty and staff. They have involved the Tau Sigma Nu fraternity. “They are making a large donation and coming by every night to add donations to the mountain,” said student Jack Berry. “We know that in an unstable economy people tend to donate less and unemployment is above 8 percent. Food is a basic need and as a school of engineering we like fundamentals. Also as an engineering school we like to build stuff so we are hoping for community involvement. The mountain started Monday and several students came by just to discuss how to construct the boxes!” The pasta will be donated to the Hunger Task Force on Feb. 3.

The second team also has focused its efforts on feeding the less fortunate. They have organized a group of students who will visit the House of Peace and serve soup to its guests on Feb. 6. “We are reaching out to the MSOE community for volunteer help and donations for making the soup,” said Shannon Jones, MSOE student. “We are currently accepting monetary donations as well as ingredients to make soup.”

The third team of students has planned an Academic All Star event on Feb. 11. John Osmanski, MSOE alumnus and owner of Osmanium Candy Company, will address MSOE students. “Attendees will learn about the unorthodox path that John has taken to lead him to the point where he is currently making brand new types of ice creams, candy and a wide range of caffeinated foods” said Steve Allen, MSOE student. “Our objective is to find individuals who are interested in hearing about entrepreneurship from someone currently in the field.”

Not only do MSOE students have the opportunity to learn about being an entrepreneur and leader at this event, by simply attending the event, they will be helping entrepreneurs around the world. The event organizers have partnered with MSOE’s Student Life Office, which will donate $3 for every person who attends the event. The donation will be given to Kiva, a non-profit organization with a mission to connect people through lending to alleviate poverty.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 24, 2012

Congratulations to MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student chapter. They are one of four finalists in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition. More than 30 universities from across the nation submitted entries. Teams had to design the plumbing systems for the Asian Art Museum in California and develop a project plan, price and schedule for all of the mechanical work in the building.

MSOE’s team will travel to Orlando, Fla., in March to present their proposals at MCAA’s national convention. They are the defending national champions, and the only team from last year’s final four to make it into the final competition. This year they will face Illinois State, Sacramento State and Southern Polytechnic Institute.

Samantha Pekarscik (MCAA student president), Amanda Heller (MCAA student vice president), Julie Burg, Brittany Campos, Dan Hosko, Michael Olk, Ben Sprecher and David Taylor will give a 15-minute presentation and answer questions in front of a panel of mechanical contractors and conference attendees.  Blake Wentz, assistant professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 17, 2012

Visit the Grohmann Museum during Gallery Night this Friday and Saturday, Jan. 20 and 21, and see the special exhibit, Working Legacies: The Death and (After) Life of Post-Industrial Milwaukee. David Schalliol and Michael Carriere will present “Re-Doing Work: A Gallery Night Conversation” on Friday at 7 p.m. Free admission is being offered Friday from 5 to 9 p.m. and Saturday from 12 to 6 p.m.

The Working Legacies exhibit uses the contemporary moment to explore the legacy of work in Milwaukee through documentary photographs and site histories of former and current facilities in the city, keeping a keen eye on the present use and local context. The result is a document of Milwaukee’s industrial past and present–and the hopeful groundwork for its future. From the manufacturing of wind turbines to tech-savvy urban farms, the demise of a working Milwaukee has been greatly exaggerated. The Working Legacies exhibit will be on display at the Grohmann Museum through Feb. 6, 2012.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 800 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields.

Originally published January 4, 2012

Sixteen members of the U.S. Army recently attended Milwaukee School of Engineering’s “Introduction to Hydraulics” course. Dr. Medhat Khalil, MSOE’s director of professional education and research development, travelled to the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in Warren, Mich., where he taught the course.

Dr. Khalil’s training at TARDEC follows similar training he offered in July at the National Maritime Intelligence Center (NMIC). Dr. Khalil offered the class at TARDEC because the attendees wanted to learn more about hydraulics, control systems, and the relationship between hydraulic systems for use in Army systems for improved reliability and operation. Introduction to Hydraulics is a 32-hour seminar designed to acquaint individuals with the fluid power field and provide a practical working knowledge of this important and growing industry.

As a result of completing this course, TARDEC employees are able to identify the distinguishing features of hydraulic systems; apply industry standards to hydraulic and schematic symbols; analyze hydraulic circuits from a schematic drawing using animated schematics modeled by Automation Studio; explain the operation and applications of valves, cylinders, pumps and motors using animation and video clips; identify the chemical and physical properties of fluids as they relate to hydraulic system operation; utilize continuity and energy balance equations; and understand the basic configuration and operation of hydrostatic transmissions.

In commenting on the skills or techniques learned in the course, attendees noted they “gained an understanding of hydraulic symbols, how hydraulic components work and the different types of components available.” Another said they learned “hydraulic systems and device operation, and the equations to perform calculations for sizing of devices.”

Introduction to Hydraulics is just one of many professional education seminars offered through MSOE’s Fluid Power InstituteTM (FPI) which are endorsed by the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) through sponsorship and educational partnership. The FPI is one of the leading academic fluid power research laboratories in the U.S., and it conducts research and testing for some of the largest hydraulic companies, as well as system evaluations for the U.S. military. By offering this course at TARDEC, the FPI further expands its relationship with the U.S. military.

MSOE is a member of the Engineering Research Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP), which develops compact, next-generation, fluid powered devices for use in aerospace, agriculture, construction, health care, manufacturing, mining and transportation.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published January 4, 2012

Milwaukee School of Engineering is the perfect place for adult students to prepare themselves for a new future. To accommodate the busy lifestyles of adult students, MSOE’s Continuing Studies and Outreach Department offers degrees in the evenings, on the weekends, and through blended, Internet-hybrid courses.

There are a number of undergraduate degree programs for those with an associate degree or prior college experience, as well as graduate degrees and professional development courses. All classes are taught by MSOE faculty (not teaching assistants) and meet one evening per week for 11 weeks. In addition, the university offers blended Internet-hybrid courses. These courses are taught in blended, Internet-hybrid format featuring face-to-face class meetings in alternating weeks.

MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. In addition to business and management degrees, MSOE offers working professionals programs in engineering, manufacturing and technology, information technology, construction, health care, Lean, project management, quality and Six Sigma.

MSOE’s Continuing Studies and Outreach programs enroll hundreds of individuals in graduate, undergraduate or professional development courses each quarter. These adults continue their education to advance their careers, stabilize their employment, increase their marketability, increase their earning potential and stay on the cutting edge in their discipline.

For more information, attend one of the upcoming Continuing Studies Information Sessions: Wednesday, Jan. 18 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at MSOE’s downtown campus, and Thursday, Jan. 26 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Bridgewood Resort Hotel & Conference Center in Neenah, Wis. To learn more, visit www.msoe.edu/wp or call (414) 277-7279.

Originally published January 12, 2012

Elementary and middle school students from Our Next Generation Inc. (ONG) will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, Jan. 16 from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Student Life and Campus Center.

Earlier this month, ONG students visited the MSOE campus to create artwork representing King. On Monday, the students will display their watercolor paintings, mingle with university students, faculty and staff, and see the unveiling of a four-foot tall replica cake of the Martin Luther King National Memorial in Washington, D.C. They also will decorate and hand out 500 cupcakes, which were donated by Metro Market and Roundy’s Supermarkets.

Through MSOE’s Office of Servant-Leadership and AmeriCorps VISTA, the university is partnering with ONG to offer programs and tutoring to urban Milwaukee children. One of the current projects has focused on helping the young children learn about and understand the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King.

About the cake
Barbara Meyer, a technical communication student at MSOE and professional cake decorator at Metro Market in downtown Milwaukee, spent 40 hours with one of her colleagues creating a replica of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial. The cake stands four feet tall and three feet wide.

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

About Our Next Generation Inc.
For nearly 20 years, ONG has provided quality academic support and life skills programs for urban Milwaukee children and youth from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. Thousands of children have benefited from the tutoring and guidance of caring and concerned volunteers.

Originally published December 18, 2011

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) held a Fluid Power Challenge on Dec. 9 at MSOE. Fifteen teams of eighth-grade students competed to solve a fluid power challenge by designing and constructing a mechanism that used fluid power technology. Participating schools included: La Causa Charter School, Milwaukee; Mitchell Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Starbuck Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Steffen Middle School Mequon, Wis. and Texas Bufkin Christian Academy, Milwaukee, Wis.

Congratulations to all who participated. The winners were:
Overall Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Portfolio Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Design Champion: Steffen Middle School Team A, coached by Matt Heuser
Team Work Champion: Steffen Middle School Team E, coached by Matt Heuser
Team Challenge Champion: Steffen Middle School Team E, coached by Matt Heuser

At a workshop in November, the students were given the assignment of designing and constructing a fluid power mechanism to perform a defined task. The mechanisms were required to use fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) to pick up weighted objects, and then place them on a platform for various point totals.

After working for four weeks, the teams came together again to compete against each other in a two-minute competition. Engineers from area companies served as judges, who graded the teams and presented awards in five categories-Overall Champion, Design Champion, Teamwork Champion, Portfolio Champion and Team Challenge Champion.

The program is designed to introduce students, and their teachers, to the world of engineering and careers in fluid power. Through the Fluid Power Challenges, the NFPA hopes to encourage students to select more mathematics and science courses in their high school curricula to keep their options open for technology-based post-secondary studies.

MSOE School of Engineering and its Fluid Power InstituteTM would like to congratulate all of the students and teachers who were involved in the competition. To learn more about the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge, call (414) 778-3347.

NFPA provides a forum for the fluid power industry’s channel partners-manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, customers and educators. Its 330+ U.S. and multinational members work cooperatively in advancing hydraulic and pneumatic technology through the association’s many programs and initiatives.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published December 14, 2011

Congratulations to MSOE’s 2010-11 SAE Formula Hybrid Team. As their senior design project, members of the team designed, fabricated and tested a Formula 1-inspired electric-hybrid race car. They repurposed 48 M28™ LITHIUM-ION Battery Packs from Milwaukee Electric Tool (the same battery packs found on common household tools) to power their car.

The students competed at the SAE Formula Hybrid International Competition at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway and won first place in the Hybrid-Electric Class and the second place GM Best Engineered Hybrid Systems Award. They also stopped in Indianapolis to participate in the Indy 500 Emerging Tech Day. While there, they took first place in the “Hybrids in Progress” Autocross!

Originally published November 29, 2011

MSOE’s Spring Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

 

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

**Note: The published Dean’s List and Honors List include only students who have allowed MSOE to release their names.

Originally published November 21, 2011

Each academic quarter, graduating students at MSOE are invited to nominate an individual from their own secondary school experience or their working experience for the VIP/Excellence in Teaching Award. They nominate someone who not only “knew her/his stuff,” but could communicate it, and whose commitment to others included encouragement of further educational and career goals. MSOE is proud to recognize those who have had a significant influence on students’ futures and also thank those, who in some important way, motivated them, inspired them and helped make it happen for them.

Congratulations to the following:

Mark Koch, Rolling Meadows (Ill.) High School
Mark Koch was nominated by Katherine E. Thompson, who received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. In her nomination Thompson said, “Mr. Koch influenced my future education by helping me decide what I was passionate about. He helped develop my skills in the field by guiding me to the right classes. He is an outstanding educator {who} encouraged us to do well in all classes because he knew we should be well-rounded in order to be successful.”

Hal Lunsford, Zion-Benton Township (Ill.) High School
Ian Andrew Ashton, who received a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering, nominated Hal Lunsford and said, “Mr. Lunsford always ensured that things were going well in my classes. He took a serious interest in all his students’ success both in high school and in our further education, and he always pushed us to do the best that we could.”

Gordon Perkins (Retired), James Madison Memorial High School (Madison, Wis.)
Kristine E. Radtke Norris received a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing and nominated Gordon Perkins, who is now retired. She said, “Mr. Perkins was an advocate and championed for his students. He treated each student fairly and with the same amount of respect. He taught his science class with fun and informative experiments that began my interest in science.”

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 21, 2011

Since it was founded in 1903, MSOE has benefitted from the advice and support of volunteer leaders. Meaningful involvement is the most accurate way to describe the manner in which MSOE’s Board of Regents and Corporation members assume their responsibilities. Comprised of representatives of business, industry, government and education, the Board of Regents governs the operations and the future planning of the university. This fall, MSOE welcomed three new Regents to the Board and four new Corporation members. Mark Train, retired president and CEO, Jason Inc., returns to the Board of Regents from Regent Emeritus status.

New Regents:
G. Woodrow Adkins is the chairman and CEO of Adkins Holdings LLC of Waukesha, Wis., a private investment company. He is the first holder of the Uihlein/Spitzer Chair of Entrepreneurship in the MSOE Rader School of Business. Adkins also is chairman, shareholder, managing director or partner of several companies and investment funds. He began in the meat industry and is a longtime food industry executive. Adkins is a member of the International Chief Executives Organization, chairman of Wisconsin Presidents Organization, and past chapter chairman and international director of the Young Presidents Organization.

Thomas A. Burke has been the CEO and president of Modine Manufacturing Co. in Racine, Wis., since 2008. He previously was the company’s chief operating officer, chief technology officer and interim regional vice president of Americas. Burke also served as CEO and president of Composite Solutions Inc. Earlier in his career, he held leadership positions at Visteon Corp. and held a variety of engineering and operations positions at Ford Motor Co. in the U.S. and Mexico.

Robert E. Vieau graduated from MSOE in 1969 with a degree in electrical engineering. He spent his career with high tech companies such as Texas Instruments and Compaq Computer Corp. At Compaq, Vieau served as the senior vice president of corporate operations and was responsible for global manufacturing of the desktop and portable computer lines with operations in Houston, Singapore and Scotland. In 1993 Vieau moved to the Thomas-Conrad Corp., where he became president and CEO. He led the company through massive change, culminating with the company’s acquisition by Compaq. He is currently president and owner of Vieau and Company in Montgomery, Texas, through which he provides consulting services.

New Corporation members:

  • William Beckett, president and CEO, Chrysalis Packaging and Assembly Corp. (Chryspac), Milwaukee
  • Randal S. Howard, president, Forrer Business Interiors Inc., Milwaukee
  • Wendy Burke Slocum, president, Burke Properties, Milwaukee
  • Richard Stangl, chairman and CEO, Weimer Industries, Menomonee Falls, Wis.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 11, 2011

James Kieselburg has been appointed to the position of director of the Grohmann Museum following the retirement of John Kopmeier, founding director. With advanced degrees in anthropology and museology from Beloit College and UW-Milwaukee, Kieselburg worked previously at the Milwaukee Public Museum and the museums of Beloit College, UW-Milwaukee and Marquette University.

Kieselburg started at MSOE in 2006 as collections and exhibition manager of the Eckhart G. Grohmann Man at Work Collection. He was instrumental in the Grohmann Museum opening in 2007, and was promoted to assistant director in 2009. He has been responsible for curating exhibitions such as Working Wisconsin: Selections from the Museum of Wisconsin Art and Lakes Boats: The Photography of Jim Brozek and Christopher Winters, as well as supervising the development of teaching technology such as the Grohmann Collection kiosk and the smART Audio Tour.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 800 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields.

Originally published November 10, 2011

MSOE students traveled to Downers Grove, Ill., in October to compete in the Associated Schools of Construction Region III Student Competition. For the tenth consecutive year, at least one of MSOE’s teams took first place. This year, the Preconstruction Team and the VDC (Virtual Design and Construction) Team took first place in their respective competitions, and the Design Build Team took third place. They competed against large universities, including Texas A&M University, Brigham Young University, Purdue University, Ball State University and Michigan State, in the various events.

MSOE’s Preconstruction Team was asked to submit a proposal for preconstruction and construction services for a $20-$25 million hospital expansion project. They had 30 hours to create their proposal and deliver a presentation to competition judges from Pepper Construction. The Preconstruction Team was coached by Dr. Jeong Woo, assistant professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department. Team members are:

  • Matt Bakke, construction management major, Elkhart Lake, Wis.
  • Chris Dublinski, construction management major, Naperville, Ill.
  • Jared Gothard, construction management major, Long Grove, Ill.
  • Josh Halvorsen, architectural engineering and construction management double major, West Dundee, Ill.
  • Cate Scholfield, construction management major, Wausau, Wis.
  • Nick Zamorski, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Waukesha, Wis.
  • Theodore Bulinski (alternate), construction management major, Minneapolis
  • Bryan Makatura (alternate), construction management major, Pen Argyle, Penn.

MSOE’s VDC Team had to submit a proposal for the virtual design and construction services for a Laboratory/Data Center building located in Milwaukee. They had 30 hours to create their proposal and deliver a presentation to competition judges from Mortenson Construction. The VDC Team was coached by Dr. Jeong Woo, assistant professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department. Team members are:

  • Angela Ahlbrecht, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Glencoe, Minn.
  • Justin Cosgrove, architectural engineering and environmental engineering dual degree, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
  • Austin Meier, architectural engineering and structural engineering dual degree, Oshkosh, Wis.
  • Mark Peterson, architectural engineering major, Burlington, Wis.
  • Ben Turk, architectural engineering and structural engineering dual degree, Minooka, Ill.
  • Brent Verhyen, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Appleton, Wis.

MSOE’s Design Build Team submitted a proposal for design build services for a $30 million student dorm at a private university in St. Louis. They were responsible for creating a proposal that included the complete architectural design, a detailed construction estimate, a construction schedule and a site logistics plan. They had 30 hours to create their proposal and deliver a presentation to McCarthy Building Company executives, the Design Build competition sponsor. The Design Build Team was coached by Robert Lemke, associate professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department. Team members are:

  • Tiffany Biagini, architectural engineering major, Moline, Ill.
  • Evan Crayford, architectural engineering and construction management double major, River Falls, Wis.
  • Kevin DePass, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Milwaukee
  • Tyler Frederick, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Sharon, Wis.
  • Blake Gleason, construction management major, New Lenox, Ill.
  • Kevin Johnson, architectural engineering and construction management double major, Menomonee Falls, Wis.
  • Matt Ostovich (alternate), architectural engineering major, Greenfield, Wis.
  • Dan Cedeno (alternate), architectural engineering and construction management double major, Milwaukee

MSOE offers bachelor’s degrees in architectural engineering, construction management and a five year freshman-to-master’s degree in civil engineering.  The architectural engineering program prepares graduates for careers in the design and construction of buildings and building systems. Lecture and laboratory courses—led by industry-experienced faculty—integrate theory and the practical application of design principles, practices, methods and materials.

The construction management program educates students to direct building construction project activities from the owner’s conception of the project until completion. Learning focuses on the technical process and resource management skills essential to construct commercial, institutional and industrial buildings on time, within budget, of high quality and safely.

Students in MSOE’s civil engineering program will receive both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in civil engineering after five years. MSOE is the first and only university in the state of Wisconsin to offer a five-year, freshman-to-master’s degree in civil engineering.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 19, 2011

With a Walkstation, Media:scape, ergonomic work stations and state-of-the-art LED lighting, the new Industrial Engineering Process Innovation Laboratory is unlike any other lab at MSOE. Ruud Lighting – a Cree Company and Forrer Business Interiors Inc. have donated lighting and equipment for this lab where industrial engineering students can conduct experiments on workplace efficiency and ergonomics.

The lab’s LED light fixtures feature 120 volt drivers capable of dimming with 0-10 volt dimmers. The fixtures are suited for both direct and indirect lighting. Students can experiment with the intensity and direction of the light, which helps them determine which type of lighting is best for various work tasks, and how lighting can affect a person’s ability to complete a task. The lighting, valued at $21,600, was donated by Ruud Lighting – a Cree Company.

The futuristic equipment and ergonomic furniture in the lab was donated in part by Forrer Business Interiors Inc. and is valued at $14,320. It includes:

  • A Steelcase Eno Technology Whiteboard, a 3-in-1 dry erase, magnetic and interactive whiteboard. The ceramic-steel surface allows students and professors to navigate through documents or the Internet and use dry erase markers or a stylus on the board. When they’re done, they can save everything they wrote on the board to post online, print or email.
  • A Steelcase Answer Workstation, a cubicle that looks like it could be found in any office environment. However, the computer monitor, keyboard and other desktop equipment is fully adjustable, so the employee can create a fully-ergonomic space. The Steelcase Leap Ergonomic chair changes shape to mimic and support the movement of the spine and is fully adjustable.
  • Three Steelcase standing adjustable-height work tables and 12 Steelcase Jack Stools mimic situations where employees can work standing up, rather than sitting.
  • Twelve Steelcase “node” student chairs feature an attached, fully adjustable, both-handed desktop; an open seat design with hooks for backpacks or jackets; and a swivel seat to keep students oriented to their work.

Additional equipment in the room, valued at more than $26,000, includes black-out shades on the windows, which aid in the lighting experiments; eight whiteboards hanging around the perimeter of the room for team collaboration; a lounge area for students to relax in with couches, a microwave and refrigerator and also:

  • A Steelcase Walkstation combines of a fully integrated electric height-adjustable surface with an exclusively engineered, low-speed commercial grade treadmill that has a maximum speed of 2 mph. Students can walk comfortably and burn calories while studying, doing Internet research, reading or writing a paper.
  • A Steelcase Media:scape which helps groups work better together. Up to six laptops can connect to one large screen, making it easy to collaborate on a project or prepare a presentation.

The space will be used for several industrial engineering labs and classes including the Ergonomics Lab; Work Planning and Methods Lab; Computer-Aided Manufacturing Lab; Team Leadership/Facilitation; and Senior Design Projects.

MSOE is an independent university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, computer, business, nursing and health-related fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salary of any Wisconsin university, according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published October 24, 2011

MSOE’s student chapter of the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) won the national championship in the 2011 Green Energy Challenge Student Competition! They presented their entries at NECA’s annual convention in San Diego on Oct. 22. This is the second year MSOE has participated in the contest, and the second year in a row that they won the championship!

The competition is sponsored by ELECTRI International – The Foundation for Electrical Construction and NECA, and was open to teams of students studying electrical construction, engineering, design and management. The students were challenged to conduct an energy audit of a dormitory at their university. They focused on lighting systems, opportunities for overall dormitory energy efficiency, and student/campus energy awareness.  All efforts were undertaken from the perspective of a design-build electrical contractor.

MSOE students analyzed the Roy W. Johnson Residence Hall on MSOE’s campus for the competition. The team of architectural engineering majors studied the 89,500 square-foot building and recommended updating the building’s lighting and heating controls. They also recommended installing solar panels to heat water and reduce energy costs. Their final plans were financially sound and followed LEED standards.

Dr. Dudley Outcalt, civil and architectural engineering and construction management associate professor, is the faculty advisor for MSOE’s NECA student chapter, and members Jessica Iversen, Brandon Jacobson, Noelle Layman, Tanya Otto, Jessica Phillips, Elise Pinkerton and Dylan Sandretto represented MSOE in the competition.

MSOE is an independent university with 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and according to PayScale Inc., the highest starting salaries among all colleges and universities in Wisconsin. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published November 8, 2011

More than 80 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Fall Commencement, Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Kern Center.

Dr. Roger Frankowski, MSOE retired vice president of academics, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Communication degree and deliver the keynote address. Quentin J. Blacklock, of Sheboygan, Wis., is the class respondent. He will be graduating with high honors and a Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems.

About Dr. Frankowski:
Frankowski joined the MSOE faculty in 1968 as an instructor and subsequently was promoted to assistant professor, associate professor and professor. He was appointed vice president of academics in 2002, after serving as chairman of the General Studies Department for 21 years. 

During his career, Frankowski also served as the North Central Association-Higher Learning Commission (NCA-HLC) liaison, the faculty representative to the NCAA, chairman of the Athletic Appeals Committee, and as an advisor to Tau Omega Mu and the Foreign Students Association.

In 1986, he traveled to Washington, D.C. to help present Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees to then Vice President and Mrs. George H. W. Bush. Frankowski has an undergraduate degree in history and political science, a master’s in history, and both a master’s and doctorate in education administration and supervision, all from Marquette University.

Frankowski’s work with students was recognized with two MSOE awards: the Oscar Werwath Distinguished Teacher Award in 1981 and the Outstanding Mentor Award in 1991. He also received the following awards: Salgo-Noren Outstanding Educator in 1973, Outstanding Educators in America in 1974 and Outstanding Young Men in America in 1972.

Frankowski is a member of the Milwaukee County Historical Society, American Society for Engineering Education, Society for Technical Communication and licensed in the Association for Psychological Type. He has served on the Executive Board of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) of Southeast Wisconsin, the Bucyrus-Erie Scholarship Award Committee, and the MSOE Athletics Hall of Fame Committee. Frankowski retired from MSOE on July 31, 2010, after 42 years of outstanding service to the university. He was named a professor emeritus in 2010 and also served as Parish Council chairman of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church.

MSOE is an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 10 master’s degrees in the engineering, engineering technology, building and infrastructure engineering, health-related engineering, computer, business and nursing fields. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; and extremely high placement rates and the highest starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.