Thanks to the Kern Family Foundation, students, alumni, faculty and staff at Milwaukee School of Engineering enjoyed a special presentation by James Davison Hunter, author of “The Death of Character: Moral Education in an Age Without Good or Evil,” on Dec. 17.

In his book, Hunter traces the death of character to the disintegration of the moral and social conditions that make character possible in the first place. The dilemma he uncovers is especially acute in the realm of moral education, where society explicitly takes on the task of instilling enduring moral commitments and ideals within young people. The various strategies for accomplishing this task—psychological, communitarian and traditionalist—all operate, in the end, within a framework that renders the goal unachievable.

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) held a Fluid Power Challenge on Dec. 9 at MSOE. Teams of eighth-grade students competed to solve a fluid power challenge by designing and constructing a mechanism that used fluid power technology. Twenty-four teams participated, making it the largest competition to date. Participating schools included: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, Milwaukee; Carter’s Christian Academy, Milwaukee; Fox River Middle School, Waterford, Wis.; Golda Meir School, Milwaukee; Humboldt Park School, Milwaukee; Lake Shore Middle School, Mequon; Lincoln Center of the Arts Middle School, Milwaukee; Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, Casco, Wis.; Mitchell Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Oak Creek West Middle School, Oak Creek, Wis.; Silverbrook Middle School, West Bend, Wis.; Starbuck Middle School, Racine, Wis.; and Steffen Middle School, Mequon, Wis

Congratulations to all who participated. The winners were:

Overall Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team B, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Portfolio Champion: Starbuck Middle School, Team A, coached by Phillip Kiley
Design Champion: Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, coached by Joe Kempke
Team Work Champion: Carter’s Christian Academy, coached by John Wamser
Team Challenge Champion: Mitchell Middle School Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Honorable Mention: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, coached by Adam Reynolds

IMG_3212.JPG.jpgAt a workshop in November, the students were given the assignment of designing and constructing a fluid power mechanism to perform a defined task. The mechanisms were required to use fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) to pick up weighted objects, and then place them on a platform for various point totals.

After working for four weeks, the teams came together again to compete against each other in a two-minute competition. Engineers from area companies served as judges, who graded the teams and presented awards in six categories-Overall Champion, Design Champion, Teamwork Champion, Portfolio Champion, Team Challenge Champion, and Honorable Mention.

The program is designed to introduce students, and their teachers, to the world of engineering and careers in fluid power. Through the Fluid Power Challenges, the NFPA hopes to encourage students to select more mathematics and science courses in their high school curricula to keep their options open for technology-based post-secondary studies.

MSOE School of Engineering and its Fluid Power InstituteTM would like to congratulate all of the students and teachers who were involved in the competition. To learn more about the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge, call (414) 778-3347.

NFPA provides a forum for the fluid power industry's channel partners-manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, customers and educators. Its 330+ U.S. and multinational members work cooperatively in advancing hydraulic and pneumatic technology through the association's many programs and initiatives.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Master’s program at Milwaukee School of Engineering will blend clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework and international experience

To close achievement gaps not only between America’s lowest and highest performing schools but between our top-performing schools and those around the world, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced today the creation of a new MBA school leadership program at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). The new program for preparing principals will blend college coursework and a tailored business curriculum with intensive clinical experience in schools, corporations, and nonprofits, and involvement in innovative schools abroad.

The Woodrow Wilson (WW) MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership will recruit and prepare experienced educators, who will take 12 to 15 months of executive-style MBA courses. The program, one of the first in the nation, will be offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and will be equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will drive innovation in schools, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international standards, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time.

"Recent studies show that principals’ and superintendents’ jobs are increasing in challenge and complexity, and yet many programs around the nation that prepare school leaders still don’t fully address those challenges,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “We need a new way of thinking about how school leaders learn to address the issues they now face. This new MBA approach is intended not only to prepare strong leaders for Wisconsin, but also to provide a new national model. It will demonstrate how a high-value education MBA can replace the M.Ed. for principals and give Wisconsin school leaders the wherewithal to be more effective.”

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, candidates will be nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows selected will have demonstrated key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. They will receive a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with mentoring and opportunities for international experience in innovative schools in other countries. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified schools for at least three years.

“MSOE offers a very pragmatic and hands-on education. Our students learn to identify and solve problems and create long-lasting solutions. We have a proven track record of graduating students who have career practice and are able to immediately apply what they’ve learned,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “It is a natural fit for MSOE to be offering the MBA in Education Leadership and enabling school leaders to drive innovation. We are raising the bar in education standards and schools that have WW MBA graduates on staff will greatly benefit.”

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership program addresses twin problems in American education: On the one hand, well-resourced U.S. schools still rank below schools in countries like Finland and Singapore on measures of student achievement. On the other hand, too many of the nation’s high-need urban and rural schools still fall too far below domestic benchmarks for student achievement.

Two institutions—MSOE and the University of Indianapolis—are participating in the launch of the WW MBA in Education Leadership program. The MSOE program will focus entirely on eradicating the international achievement gap. According to McKinsey & Company, the United States’ economy loses as much as $2 trillion annually because its schools lag behind those in such countries as Finland and Singapore.

The national director of the program, LeAnn Buntrock, previously headed the acclaimed education leadership program at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. Based at the Foundation’s Princeton, N.J. office, Dr. Buntrock oversees the Indianapolis and Milwaukee programs as well as several expansion efforts currently under consideration. She has worked closely with Dr. Levine to shape and implement the program in accord with his previous findings.

“As schools face a wide array of changes, school leaders have to find new ways to engage strong teachers and help them drive student achievement. What makes the WW MBA Fellowship distinctive is that it really focuses on transformational leadership—different techniques for spotting and diagnosing issues, solving problems, motivating others to go beyond the status quo,” said Dr. Buntrock. “It’s also very unusual for leadership programs around the country to partner with school districts and education organizations to identify relevant projects that will give candidates actual in-school experiences, as this program will.”

MSOE will partner with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements—that is, in-school learning arrangements—and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows. Fifteen Fellows will be selected for the program, with the first class announced in late spring 2014 and beginning the program in summer 2014. The candidates the program will produce, say local officials, are the kind of leaders their schools need.

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state Teaching Fellowship, which recruits very able candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools, and also works to transform teacher education. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in four states with 23 universities.

Applications to the WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership are available by nomination only. To learn more about the program at MSOE, visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership. Go to http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation.

The program is under review for approval by the Higher Learning Commission, with a final decision expected in summer 2014. It is also under review by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction with a decision expected by early 2014.

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation www.woodrow.org identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee School of Engineering (www.msoe.edu) is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering has announced nine former student-athletes will make up the 2014 induction class into the MSOE Athletic Hall of Fame.

Chris Boardman '05, Catherine Chappell '08, Benjamin Herrmann '07, Leah Leja '08, Jeff Mikos '06, Scott Murphy '08, Ryan Shefchik '02, Brian Soik '07 and Lee Swallow '09 will be inducted during a ceremony and banquet Feb. 8, 2014 at the Kern Center.

More information is available on the Go-Raiders.com athletics website.

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) is seeking comments from the public about the university in preparation for its periodic evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The university will host a visit April 7-9, 2014, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.  MSOE has been accredited by the Commission since 1971. The team will review the institution’s ongoing ability to meet the Commission’s Criteria for Accreditation.

The public is invited to submit comments regarding the university to:

Public Comment on the Milwaukee School of Engineering
The Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL  60604-1411

The public may also submit comments on the Commission’s website at www.ncahlc.org. (Click on the “Resources for the Public” link and a link to the on-line third-party comment form appears approximately half way down the page.)

Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by Feb. 15, 2014.

Congratulations to all of the students who were named to the 2013 Fall Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean's List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive "high honors." Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean's List.

Dean's List (pdf)   |   Honors List (pdf)

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Filter Blog

By date:
By tag: