The Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM) at Milwaukee School of Engineering has been awarded $540,000 by the National Science Foundation to extend the CREST Program for an additional three years. The CREST program (Connecting Researchers, Educators and STudents) engages undergraduate students in collaborative projects with science researchers and educators to transform current research topics into innovative instructional materials that can be used in undergraduate classrooms. This latest grant is the third in a series of awards to the CBM, made by the National Science Foundation in support of its efforts to transform undergraduate education into a more active, student-centered pedagogy.

In the CREST program, an undergraduate educator identifies a “difficult to teach” concept, then works with a small team of students to explore the topic in depth. The team is paired with a research lab studying a protein related to the topic. The team then visits the research lab to learn more about the topic, and then designs and builds a physical model of the protein using 3D printing technology at the CBM. Students create posters and give oral presentations at an annual Research and Teaching Symposium hosted at MSOE. After models are built, students collaborate with educators to develop instructional materials related to the topic, including interactive tutorials, puzzles, and molecular landscapes.

Currently, 35 faculty members at 22 institutions are involved in the CREST Project. Many of the materials developed as part of the project are available online (cbm.msoe.edu/crest) or through the MSOE Model Lending Library, which loans approximately 400 models to educators throughout the US each year.

The Center for BioMolecular Modeling is a grants-funded instructional materials development laboratory which collaborates with researchers and educators to bring current research related to the molecular biosciences into middle school through college classrooms.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Rader School of Business students now have the opportunity to study abroad at Florence University of the Arts in Florence, Italy. Students can choose from a wide variety of elective courses, including sports management/marketing, intercultural communication, international banking, sustainability and much more. The program is currently designed to run for two MSOE academic quarters (either Fall/Winter or Winter/Spring). In Italy, students will take five classes during one semester and then two classes during the January intercession.

All courses are taught in English, and students work with their program director to select courses and ensure the credits will transfer to their major at MSOE. Students also have the opportunity to take international courses that interest them but may not be available at MSOE.

Famous for its history, Florence is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance and home to such masterpieces as Michelangelo’s and Botticelli’s Birth of Venus. Florence University of the Arts has seven locations in Florence and its schools offer a rich variety of academic disciplines. In addition to academics, students have access to several experiential components such as educational field trips, involvement in the local culture through community service and volunteer opportunities, as well as extracurricular activities organized by FUA’s Student Life and Development Office.

For more information about this program, contact Dr. Michael Payne at paynemj@msoe.edu or (414) 277-7589.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

A team of MSOE students took third place in the Integrated Sustainable Building Design (ISBD) competition. The students are part of MSOE’s student chapter of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and represented the university in the 2013 ASHRAE Student Competition.

ASHRAE sponsors international competitions to encourage students to become involved in a profession that is crucial to insuring a sustainable future for our Earth – the design of energy-efficient HVAC systems. The ISBD competition requires multidisciplinary teams to design an energy efficient sustainable project approaching a “Zero-Energy” building with minimized energy demands for HVAC and all other technical systems that could be satisfied with locally available or building-installed renewable energy sources (RES). The emphasis in this competition is on whole-building design, integrating architectural, and construction, mechanical, electrical and other technical disciplines in an integrated approach throughout the design process.

Members of the team included Tiffany Biagini, Ken Brickner, Garrett Ducat, Jake Frey, Andrew Grygiel, Joe Kolavo, Courtney Leaf and Mike Lieu. Each student played an important role.

Ducat, a 2013 architectural engineering graduate, and Kolavo a senior architectural engineering major, were the principal investigators of the Dallas Power and Light Luxury Apartments project’s mechanical systems. Both specialize in building mechanical systems. They performed calculations and made design decisions. Kolavo will accept the team’s award at the ASHRAE Winter Meeting in New York in January 2014.

Biagini and Grygiel, who both graduated with architectural engineering degrees in 2013 and specialized in building mechanical systems, helped compile the report and provided information about the building’s mechanical systems.

Brickner, a 2013 graduate and the only construction management major on the team, was the team’s construction manager. He was responsible for the constructability criteria of the project and meeting LEED requirements.

Frey, an architectural engineering senior specializing in building structural systems, designed the structural system for the Dallas Power and Light Luxury Apartment project.

Leaf and Lieu are both senior architectural engineering majors specializing in building electrical systems. Leaf designed the electrical system for the project and Lieu provided complimentary information for the chosen electrical systems and helped in compiling report data.

Several faculty members advised the team including: Dr. Bass Abushakra, mechanical systems advisor and general competition advisor; Richard W. Eschner, architecture advisor; DeAnna Leitzke, construction management advisor; Dr. Doug Stahl, structural systems advisor; Doug Nelson, plumbing and fire protection advisor; and Andrew Walther, electrical systems advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The Grohmann Museum is hosting the fourth annual Lost Arts Festival. A celebration of our working past, the festival brings to life the activities and ways of work captured in the paintings and bronzes in the museum's permanent collection. On Saturday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., artisans will demonstrate their craft as the museum and its surroundings become a laboratory for the creation of “Lost Arts.” Regular museum admission applies: $5 adults; $3 students and seniors; free for children under 12 and MSOE students, faculty, staff and alumni (with I.D.).

Helena Ehlke and the Grohmann Museum Master Painters: painting
The Grohmann Museum Master Painters use Old Masters’ techniques in order to create a sense of real depth in their art.  In contrast to modern photo-realism, the Old Masters focused on creating three-dimensionality on a flat canvas.  “Old Masters’ techniques” generally refers to a method of using indirect or layered painting techniques.  By using the indirect method of painting, oil-painting artists of the past were able to stretch the ability of oil paints to create optical illusions of a three-dimensional world.  The artists will be demonstrating these techniques by showing how artists of the past used layered painting techniques to create their works.

Kent Knapp: blacksmith
Kent Knapp began his study of blacksmithing and Milwaukee’s history at the age of 19. His passion for working with iron is matched only by his aptitude for working with it. The delicate leaves and scrolls within the immense strength of his projects are the perfect marriage for functional artistry. Capturing the classic designs or creating new ones in the old traditions, Knapp finds every challenge a new adventure. Knapp will tend to the forge and create unique pieces specifically for the Lost Arts festival.

Cheryl Myers and the MSOE Yarn Engineers: spinning, knitting, crocheting
A self-taught fiber artist, Cheryl Myers started working with yarns and fibers almost 25 years ago. Along the way she has learned the art of knitting, crocheting and hand-spinning. She has taught knitting and crocheting to hundreds who have crossed her path, and today she still enjoys making all sorts of creations out of both handmade yarns as well as store-bought fibers. Some of her creations include wool needle-felted bears, knit wool felted hats, nuno wool felted items, crocheted baby afghans, shawls and many more handmade items. Myers also directs a group of MSOE Yarn Engineers in their textile creations.

Bob “Sieg” Siegel and Luke Traver: wooden shoe carvers
Having studied with 12 master carvers in the Netherlands, Bob “Sieg” Siegel is the last master wooden-shoe carver in America. Luckily, he has enlisted two apprentices, one of whom will carve for the Lost Arts festival. Luke Traver hand carves wearable wooden shoes from log sections using three traditional tools: a side ax, block knife and spoon auger.

Mary L. Spencer: glass artist
Like many artists, Many Spencer has dabbled and experimented with a variety of media. She fell in love with glass after being introduced to it by a friend. It was love at first score and snap of the glass. Her work includes home décor or wearable glass art using the traditional (Tiffany) copper-foil method, glass fusing and mosaic. She frequently incorporates copper, brass, and/or silver in the design piece. Much of her work is influenced by African and Asian culture. The joy derived from working with glass is evident in the color, texture and beauty of the final piece.

Frogwater
The Lost Arts festival will feature live music from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. by Milwaukee’s own Frogwater, the acoustic musical pairing of John and Susan Nicholson. Renowned for their musical virtuosity and exuberant live performances, they like to think of themselves as musical ambassadors, and describe their style as “eclectic acoustic peoples’ music.” Their repertoire spans from Celtic to delta blues, classical to pop, with a healthy dose of unique, original material filling out the mix. Their innovative interpretations of traditional tunes span the centuries and the miles and defy categorization.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is located at MSOE, an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, business and nursing fields.

Outstanding full-time and part-time faculty members recently were honored at MSOE.

Dr. Jay Urbain, associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, received the Karl O. Werwath Engineering Research Award. Karl O. Werwath was an innovator in engineering education and the application of technology, and believed that teaching effectiveness was enhanced through applied research and consulting. He felt that MSOE should make an effort to contribute to the advancement of technical knowledge for the benefit of business and industry for the good of the community and the nation. This award was initiated to recognize the vision of Karl O. Werwath and the contribution of MSOE faculty and staff who have fostered the advancement of applied scientific knowledge. Urbain was nominated for this award by MSOE faculty and staff members, alumni, Regents and Corporation members. The award recipients are chosen based on criteria including their contribution to engineering, scientific research, consulting, the engineering profession and scholarship, promoting research at MSOE, patentable concepts and publications. Urbain holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Northeastern Illinois University, a bachelor’s degree in engineering, computer and information systems from University of Illinois at Chicago, a master’s degree in computer from Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), an MBA from UW-Madison, and a Ph.D. in computer science from IIT.

The Falk Engineering Educator Award was presented to Dr. Richard Kelnhofer, P.E., an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, and electrical engineering program director. The award is given annually to a full-time faculty member with less than seven years experience. It is a testament to exemplary dedication and performance. Kelnhofer received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from UW-Milwaukee, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in electrical engineering, from Marquette University.

Mark Zimmerman, an adjunct assistant professor in the General Studies Department, received the Johnson Controls Award, presented to outstanding part-time faculty. The award was inspired by Robert C. Moore, a long-time faculty member in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department. The award recognizes the contributions of part-time faculty to the education, motivation and support of the students at MSOE; encourages and recognizes excellence in teaching, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels; recognizes commitment and assistance to students outside of the classroom; and recognizes contributions to the improvement of educational programs and the effectiveness of the learning process at MSOE. Zimmerman earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from UW-Milwaukee.

Five members of the faculty were named Professors Emeriti. They are: Dr. Sherrill Leifer, associate professor, School of Nursing; Dr. Dudley Outcalt, associate professor, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department; Dr. Owe Petersen, professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and assistant vice president of institutional research and assessment; Joyce Solochek, instructor, Physics and Chemistry Department; and Dr. Tom Swiontek, professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering earned the 21st spot on U.S. News & World Report’s 2014 list of Best Universities in the Midwest. MSOE was ranked 10th in the Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs category among engineering schools whose highest degree is a bachelor’s or master’s. In addition, MSOE’s Electrical Engineering Program was ranked 7th nationwide.

About the rankings:

The 2014 rankings by U.S. News provide an examination of how nearly 1,400 accredited four-year schools compare on a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Among the many factors weighed in determining the rankings, the key measures of quality are: peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

MSOE officials noted that while the survey results are very gratifying, results should not be overemphasized by students or their families during the college selection process. Choosing a college is an individual decision that should be made by students and families based on the student’s individual needs. Students come to MSOE because of its focus on laboratory experience and career practice, expert faculty dedicated to student learning, its small college feeling within a vibrant downtown neighborhood, extremely high placement rates for graduates and the success of its alumni.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE welcomes the following full-time faculty members:

  • Dr. Anne Alexander, assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
  • Dr. Robert Hasker, associate professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Dr. Steven Holland ’06, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Brian King ’86, assistant professor, School of Nursing
  • Dr. Adam Livingston, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Katie A. McCarthy ’99, ’05, instructor and medical informatics program director, Rader School of Business
  • Dr. Patricia Neudecker, education director, MBA Educational Leadership program, Rader School of Business
  • Dr. Serdar Ozturk, assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
  • Rhonda Powell, assistant professor, School of Nursing
  • Dr. Nebojsa Sebastijanovic, assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
  • Dr. Alexandra Sielaff, associate professor and director of Continuing Studies and Outreach Department, Rader School of Business
  • Dr. Kerry Widder, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Dr. Daniel Williams, associate professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
  • Dr. Josiah Yoder, assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department

 

MSOE also welcomes the following part-time faculty members:

  • Susan Becker, lecturer, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
  • Lisa Bixby, clinical nursing instructor, School of Nursing
  • Christine Brotz ’04, lecturer, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
  • Dr. John Choren, adjunct assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
  • Christina Dzioba, clinical nursing instructor, School of Nursing
  • Gitte Frandsen, lecturer, General Studies Department
  • Dr. Steven Fredette, adjunct professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Nicole Hines, lecturer, General Studies Department
  • Jennifer Knapkiewicz, lecturer, General Studies Department
  • Dr. Jason Kowalski, adjunct assistant professor, Physics and Chemistry Department
  • Chelsea Krause, adjunct assistant professor, Rader School of Business
  • Dr. Katrina Moskalik, adjunct assistant professor, Rader School of Business
  • Lori Pink ’93, ’13, lecturer, Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department
  • Dr. Kristina Puotkalyte-Gurgel, lecturer, General Studies Department
  • Richard Reinders, lecturer, General Studies Department
  • Carol Tumey, adjunct assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Baohuy Ung, adjunct assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Brenda Van Roosenbeek, clinical nursing instructor, School of Nursing
  • Luke Weber, adjunct assistant professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Cyndie Weis, lecturer, General Studies Department

 

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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In A Working Ranch, Milwaukee photographer Jim Brozek presents a striking visual meditation on life and work on an American ranch. Working on a New Mexico ranch in the late 1970s and early ‘80s, Brozek captured the essence of ranching life and all of its nuances. The joy, hardship, prosperity and challenges of this working life are glimpsed through images of ranching activities that continue to this day. More than a visual document, this exhibition provides a feeling of what life is like on a working ranch.

The exhibit will be open at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from Sept. 6 through Dec. 13. In conjunction with Milwaukee’s Gallery Night and Day Event, the Grohmann Museum will present a gallery talk with Brozek on Friday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering.

The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Tempt your taste buds at this year’s WMSE 91.7FM Food Slam. Sample culinary delights from more than 25 Milwaukee area restaurants and help support your favorite local radio station. The event will be held at the Grohmann Museum on MSOE’s campus on Friday, Sept. 13 6 to 10 p.m. Throughout the evening attendees will enjoy all that the Food Slam has to offer against the backdrop of the entire Grohmann historic art collection and the museum’s new exhibit featuring Milwaukee photographer Jim Brozek’s striking visual meditation on life and work on an American ranch.

In addition to Food Slam being a food tasting and silent auction event, this year’s fundraiser includes a 50/50 raffle and an all-new live auction conducted by one of Milwaukee’s most singular personalities, WMSE station manager Tom Crawford. Crawford will act as auctioneer for a group of high-value auction packages including an island of Kauai Hawaiian vacation for two at a fully furnished condo overlooking the Cliffs At Princeville; an original artwork from celebrated Milwaukee artist Charlie Dwyer; a Movie Mogul Milwaukee Film Festival package valued at $5000; and more.

Food Slam attendees will sample fare from more than 25 Milwaukee restaurants and food providers that run the gamut from fine dining establishments and artisan food makers to BBQ joints and pizzerias. “Our food-related fundraisers are financially critical to our operations, but Food Slam is more than that. We’re all about trying to represent Milwaukee in everything we do,” said Tom Crawford. “That includes using our events to represent the incredible variety of food available in Milwaukee. And without a doubt, we believe that WMSE makes Milwaukee a better place, as do these restaurants and business.”

The Food Slam silent action is an integral part of the event’s success, too. This year’s silent auction includes works from local artists, musicians, and businesses along with a quite a few unique experiences including an all-access tour of the Harley-Davidson Museum with the museum’s curator, an opportunity to be the voice of Present Music, a chance to go behind the scenes for a Milwaukee Magazine photo shoot, and a pizza party at an historic Milwaukee firehouse.

Advance tickets for the 12th Annual Food Slam fundraiser are $40 and can be purchased online or at the WMSE studios – 820 N. Milwaukee St. Tickets are $50 at the door.

Participating Restaurants and Business:

Afro Fusion Cuisine, Anodyne Coffee Roasting Co., Atomic Chocolate Co., Beans & Barley, Blue's Egg, Bolzano Artisan Meats, Centro Cafe, Eat Cake!, It'z My Party Cakery, Jownai Fouquet, Love Handle, Martita's Mixers, Maxie's, Milwaukee Ale House, The Milwaukee Pizza Company, Motor Bar & Restaurant, The Noble, Palomino, Purple Door Ice Cream, Red Rock Saloon, Rocket Baby Bakery, The Rumpus Room, SALA, Times Square Pizzeria and more!

WMSE 91.7FM is a listener-supported radio station owned and operated by Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) whose mission is to support and enhance the Milwaukee community, entertain and educate members of the Milwaukee community by providing a wide selection of musical and cultural programming that they can’t readily hear elsewhere, be an effective and creative public outlet for local artists who would otherwise receive little or no broadcast exposure in our community, all while enhancing the image of, and bringing tangible value to, MSOE.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.