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Water_Innovation_web.jpgTeam USA emerged victorious over Team Australia in the inaugural Water Innovation Challenge held during International Water Week in Singapore June 3-5. Involved with the team, which was organized by the American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE), were Douglas Nelson, P.E., assistant professor, and architectural engineering alumna Judith Torres ’12, G.E. (pictured, second from left). During three days of intense competition, the teams developed innovative solutions for emerging water and sanitation problems in Nepal and Bangladesh in a series of hands-on design challenges.

The multi-disciplined Team USA was comprised of students and professionals under the age of 26 and was led by William N. Erickson, an ASPE member and a vice president of ASPE’s Research Foundation. Torres, an associate member of ASPE who works as a graduate mechanical engineer for Progressive AE in Grand Rapids, Mich., was chosen as the engineer member of the team by the ASPE board of directors. Another ASPE member, Nelson, served as an advisor to the team.

“The clear understanding of the competition and the attention to detail of Doug Nelson and Judy Torres, both ASPE members, helped Team USA score consistently higher than the Australians in almost every category," said Erickson.

The other team members were Nicholas Michalenko, a licensed journeyman plumber with Rida Plumbing in Worthington, Mass.; Sarah Parker, an advertising and design student at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C.; and Tim Murphy, an apprentice plumber at Boulanger’s Plumbing & Heating in Easthampton, Mass.

“It was such an amazing experience, made even better when our efforts were rewarded with taking first place,” said Torres. “I am thankful ASPE gave this opportunity to a young professional and even more thankful I was chosen. It was an honor to represent ASPE, engineers, my company, and of course Team USA.”

The Water Innovation Challenge involved three main components. The first challenge, completed prior to the start of the competition, required the teams to design and document new water solutions to meet community problems in a village in northern Bangladesh. The second challenge, completed during the three days of competition, was to design and document solutions to community problems in Nepal. The final challenge involved hands-on practical tasks assigned each day, including assembling a hand bore pump, a rainwater collection system, and a solar pump installation. Using their assembled pumps, the teams raced against each other each day to be the first to fill a 100-liter water tank. The teams also were required to construct user-friendly installation and maintenance manuals that presented no language barriers. 

“It was an intense and stressful experience, but having so many tasks to complete gave us the energy to get through each day,” said Torres. Team USA and Team Australia were neck in neck at the end of the first day, but Team USA quickly learned from their mistakes and persevered on days two and three. “The members of Team USA complimented each other so well—as we gave our final presentations of our designs, it seemed like we had worked together for years,” she says. “I felt so proud to be part of such an amazing team, and I’m excited to see how our designs unfold when they are implemented in Bangladesh and Nepal.”

The 2014 Water Innovation Challenge was organized by the WorldSkills Foundation, Healthabitat, the World Plumbing Council, and the Institute of Technical Education in Singapore to raise awareness of sustainable systems that can be put in place globally to address issues such as water industry education and training, skills accreditation, installation, and maintenance. Team USA was sponsored financially by ASPE, the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO), Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA), Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC), and WorldSkills USA. Sloan Valve also made a generous donation.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

GEGirls.jpg

More than two dozen Waukesha-area girls will go on a week-long journey exploring the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) through hands-on projects and mentoring from local women in STEM careers. The ‘GE Girls at MSOE’ program, now in its third year, is sponsored by the GE Healthcare Women’s Network and Milwaukee School of Engineering. The program takes place June 23-27, 2014 on the MSOE campus and at GE facilities.

Topics range from medical technologies, chemistry and additive engineering to engine design, quality control and lean manufacturing – with special curriculum presented by teachers from Waukesha Public Schools and MSOE, as well as experts from local GE Healthcare and GE Power and Water facilities. Each participating girl will also be able to meet with an accomplished female mentor with an engineering or technology background that currently participates in the GE Women’s Network. 

“The GE Girls at MSOE program helps make science fun for girls. We have a number of exciting projects planned for them which demonstrate the role math and science play in our everyday lives,” said Dr. Olga Imas, associate professor of biomedical engineering at MSOE. “It’s critical that we reach girls at a young age so we can nurture a lasting curiosity that will benefit them in the future.”

At the end of the week, the GE Girls and their parents will join GE leaders, mentors, and program directors at a BBQ celebration at GE Healthcare’s Waukesha Campus.

“I’m excited to be hosting our third year of GE Girls,” says Dee Mellor, executive champion for GE Women’s Network. “The feedback from the girls and their parents has been extremely positive, and the GE team is thrilled that this program can help inspire girls to dream big and embrace science, technology, engineering and math.”

GE Healthcare supports education in the greater Milwaukee area through several GE Volunteer efforts: including collaboration with six different Milwaukee Public Schools; Junior Achievement; FIRST Robotics; Community Service Day; and many mentoring efforts. In 2013, more than 4,900 GE Volunteers in Milwaukee served for more than 42,000 hours in their local communities. There will be six GE Girls programs being held across the United States this summer.

About GE Healthcare

GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services to meet the demand for increased access, enhanced quality and more affordable healthcare around the world. GE (NYSE: GE) works on things that matter - great people and technologies taking on tough challenges. From medical imaging, software & IT, patient monitoring and diagnostics to drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies and performance improvement solutions, GE Healthcare helps medical professionals deliver great healthcare to their patients.

About MSOE

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

web_calatrava.jpgOne of Milwaukee’s most notable landmarks, the Milwaukee Art Museum’s Quadracci Pavilion, has been replicated with 15,000 LEGO pieces by students at Milwaukee School of Engineering. The creation includes the museum’s signature wings, the Burke Brise Soleil, and Windhover Hall, the grand entrance of the pavilion. The replica’s wings are made of LEGOs and open and close just as the Burke Brise Soleil.

The LEGO replica will be unveiled at the Quadracci Pavilion during the museum’s Lakefront Festival of Art June 20-22, 2014.

The Quadracci Pavilion was created by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, who received an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree from MSOE in 1997.The students worked with GRAEF, the original project’s engineering firm, to obtain plans for the building so their replica could be as accurate as possible.

The students, who are members of MSOE’s Architectural Engineering Institute, spent a combined 525 hours designing and building the project. Approximately one-third of that time was spent on the electrical components of the project and the wings. The scale of the project is 1:6, where one inch equals six feet.

Members of the team include:

  • Matt Furey, architectural engineering, Hermitage, Penn.
  • Jason Genz, electrical engineering, Greendale, Wis.
  • Leah Hendricks, architectural engineering, De Pere, Wis.
  • Adam Laux, architectural engineering, Baraboo, Wis.
  • Michael Rajzer, electrical engineering, Greendale, Wis.
  • Devon Searfoss, architectural engineering, Ojibwa, Wis.
  • Brittany Vitkovich, architectural engineering, Crown Point, Ind.
  • William Walters, architectural and structural engineering, Waukesha, Wis.
  • Chris Zajac ’12, structural engineering, Carol Stream, Ill.

Following the Lakefront Festival of Art, the project will be displayed at MSOE’s Walter Schroeder Library.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering’s School of Nursing has received notification that its Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree has been granted continued accreditation for 10 years, extending to June 2024, with no compliance concerns with respect to the key elements. The B.S. in Nursing is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation).

MSOE opened its School of Nursing after a merger with the Milwaukee County General Hospital School of Nursing (MCGHSN) in 1995. The program has been growing steadily ever since, and now includes an accelerated second-degree B.S. in Nursing program and a M.S. in Nursing in Health Care Systems Management degree.

The Ruehlow Nursing Complex, a $3 million, 25,000 square-foot innovative and experiential learning center, opened in 2013. Nursing students actively engage in simulation-based learning opportunities in authentic representations of actual healthcare situations. They integrate theoretical learning into practice through experiential learning opportunities that allow for repetition, feedback, evaluation and reflection.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

A team of MSOE freshmen, dubbed the “Imagineers,” took second place in the Technical Challenge at the Destination Imagination Global Tournament in Knoxville, Tenn. The first-year team came together and placed in the top of the standings with their creative solution to designing and building a piece of equipment that could detect and remove hidden objects.

DI_team.jpgThe MSOE Imagineers and their majors are: Patrick Holston, biomolecular engineering; Katie Hornberger, biomolecular engineering; Dan Miller, software engineering; Kevin Muldowney, software engineering; Joe Ruggiero, mechanical engineering; Wyatt Starck, electrical engineering; and Monica Tessman, biomolecular engineering. Mandy Runnalls, MSOE admissions counselor, is the team’s advisor.

To complete the challenge, the team had to stick to a budget of $185 or less. They made 16 containers and 10 objects, and randomly placed the objects into the containers. Their objects were pieces of PVC pipe, filled with three pounds of concrete. Their piece of equipment to detect, remove and transport the objects across the finish line consisted of a stretched guitar string over a wooden rig.

To detect an object, the containers were pulled through a housing that was suspended on the guitar string. They plucked the guitar string with a solenoid pick, and the change in weight on the housing changed the pitch of the guitar string. The frequency was recorded by a team-made guitar pickup, and inputted to a computer where the frequency was analyzed by team-created software. The computer determined if there was an object in the container based on the frequency. This data was sent to an Arduino and a circuit panel controlling a winch motor, pick-solenoid and pneumatic solenoid. There also was an ultrasonic sensor as an input to the Arduino. When the container was in position to be analyzed the ultrasonic sensor stopped the winch motor. If an object was detected, a piston would eject it out and down a ramp.  The object would then roll across the finish line.

Their second place finish was amazing given how late they started relative to the teams they were competing against, and only two of MSOE’s team members had prior experience with Destination Imagination. Large crowds watched them debug and build their device. After their competition round several people approached them to see how they were able to do what they did. It was a great effort showcasing their electrical, software, mechanical and biological knowledge.

Destination Imagination is a cause-driven volunteer-led non-profit organization dedicated to teaching students the creative process through STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), the arts and service learning challenges. The challenge program gives teams the opportunity to solve open-ended challenges and present their solutions at local tournaments which can qualify them to compete at global finals.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

_MG_7604_web.jpgThe Grohmann Museum’s popular Piano Portraits Concert Series takes a French focus on Sunday, June 29 at 2 p.m. when pianist Dr. Jeffrey Hollander presents “Under Paris Skies.” Featuring the music of Frederic Chopin, Camille Saint-Saens and Claude Debussy, and improvisations on popular songs written about Paris, the concert will help you get excited about Milwaukee’s Bastille Days festival, to be held less than two weeks later.                          

Inspired by classical compositions, popular tunes and jazz improvisations, Hollander weaves a series of fantasies touching on sentiment, brilliance, humor and deep pathos in a living concert. He likes to share interesting anecdotes about the composers and requests themes from the audience for improvisation at the conclusion. His stunning concerts have thrilled audiences in America and Europe. He has appeared as a soloist with the Milwaukee and Chicago symphonies. The Piano Portraits Concert Series was created specifically for the Grohmann Museum, and takes thematic inspiration from the museum’s exhibitions.

Concerts are held at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. MSOE faculty, staff and students are admitted free. Call (414) 277-2300 or email grohmannmuseum@msoe.edu for tickets or more information.

Upcoming concerts:

Aug. 16, 2014, 3 p.m.
Rhapsody: The World of Franz Liszt, featuring the brilliant concert music of pianist Franz Liszt and Spanish composer Isaac Albeniz, as well as improvisations on the romantic melodies of Hollywood’s Harry Warren, composer of “42nd Street.”

Oct. 25, 2014, 3 p.m.
When you Wish Upon a Star: Inspired by the Carl Spitzweg Collection, featuring the music of Robert Schumann, Richard Wagner, and Spanish romantic composer Enrique Granados, followed by free romantic improvisations.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

MSOE’s School of Nursing will offer a Master of Science in Nursing: Health Care Systems Management beginning Fall 2014. The demand for well-educated, business-oriented professional nurses in managerial and leadership roles is growing due to the increasing complexity of the health care system.

Nurses at mid-management and executive levels and nurse entrepreneurs must manage financial resources and human capital, analyze large data sets, understand complex organizational systems, and ensure quality and safety, all through the lens of nursing practice.

The new MSN degree at MSOE meets this need and is unique in that many courses are co-taught. For example, the first half of “Statistical Thinking and Data Analytics” is taught by faculty in the Rader School of Business. The second half is taught by faculty in the School of Nursing who will then apply the business learning to a health care setting.

The MSN in Health Care Systems Management is best described as a graduate degree in nursing blended with business concepts. The unique blend of nursing, business and engineering concepts will equip graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively in the health care environment. Courses are available via blended-Internet format, combining the benefits of face-to-face interaction with the convenience of online learning.

More information is available at www.msoe.edu/nursing.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Three Wisconsin high school teachers received the VIP Excellence in Teaching Award from Milwaukee School of Engineering.

Each academic quarter, graduating students from MSOE are invited to nominate an individual from their own secondary school experience for the VIP Excellence in Teaching Award. The award recognizes individuals who not only “know their stuff,” but can communicate it, and whose commitment to others includes encouragement of further educational and career goals.

MSOE is proud to recognize those who have had a significant influence on their students’ futures and in some important way, motivated them, inspired them and helped make it happen for them.

Congratulations to:

  • Lee Blount, Wilmot Union High School, Wilmot, Wis.
  • David Clarke, Nathan Hale High School, West Allis, Wis.
  • Chris Streufert, Arrowhead High School, Hartland, Wis.
    (formerly of Kaukauna High School, Kaukauna, Wis.)

 

Lee Blount was nominated by his former student Cynthia Przybylski, who graduated from MSOE with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. In her nomination Przybylski said, “Mr. Blount made learning fun, and he developed a relationship with each one of his students. With his amazing ability to connect with everyone he had in class, Mr. Blount not only taught his students science, but also how to become a good person.”

Anthony Leonardelli, who graduated from MSOE with high honors and a bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering and master’s degree in structural engineering, nominated his former teacher David Clarke. He said, “Mr. Clarke challenged us to surpass our own expectations, and he taught us the study skills necessary to accomplish this goal. He fostered an atmosphere of learning, infused humor into his lessons, and attempted to impart to us his excitement for the material. Mr. Clarke gave me the first sampling of the rigor of college coursework. He motivated me to work hard and provided me the necessary study skills to thrive.”

Chris Streufert was nominated by Mitchell Uitenbroek, who graduated from MSOE with honors and a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. Uitenbroek was one of Streufert’s students at Kaukauna High School. In his nomination he said, “Mr. Streufert did a tremendous job of not only teaching the material, but connecting to his students and making sure they understood what was being taught. He helped me enjoy learning how the world works and why things react the way they do.”

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Friday, May 23 is Senior Project Day at MSOE and more than 80 projects will be on display at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Throughout their senior year, MSOE students collaborate with classmates on a final project related to their degree program. It’s an opportunity for them to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. The projects are often sponsored by companies looking to solve a problem, and others are driven by a student’s interests.

  • School of Nursing – 10 a.m. to Noon – Student Life and Campus Center, Ruehlow Nursing Complex
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department – 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Walter Schroeder Library and Werwath Mall
  • Physics and Chemistry Department – 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. – Student Life and Campus Center, second floor
  • Mechanical Engineering Department – Noon to 3 p.m. – Todd Wehr Auditorium

 

A complete list of projects can be downloaded here (PDF).

Here is a short list of examples:

Formula Hybrid Race Car
Unique features of this hybrid one-seater car include an electronic throttle system and a power combining transmission. Vehicles like this traditionally couple an electric motor and gasoline engine to the wheels via a chain and sprocket system, which averages 83% efficiency, and is 92% efficient at best. MSOE’s vehicle, with the geared transmission and no chains, sees 98-99% efficiency. Students designed and built this vehicle for the SAE Formula Hybrid Competition. Location: Todd Wehr Auditorium

Ag-Rover
his autonomous ground rover represents the future of agriculture. The Ag-Rover receives commands wirelessly and traverses farmland terrain with full autonomy. It looks like your average Toro Workman MDE, until it starts driving all on its own!  It is part of a robotic system including drones and quadcopters currently being co-developed with Santa Clara University in California. The Ag-Rover will enable large-scale commercial farms to collect data and accurately monitor and micromanage their crops. Location: Todd Wehr Auditorium

Adaptive Camouflage
Military vehicles and equipment are painted with camouflage – which is great until they move into a different terrain. Adaptive Camouflage is a device that captures scenes of the environment and processes the image to determine a pattern for the vehicle that best fits the terrain type. Location: Walter Schroeder Library

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Dylan Shiltz, a senior mechanical engineering student, received the SAME ROTC Award of Merit. The award was presented by U.S. Navy Rear Admiral David Steindl on behalf of the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) at the Tri-ROTC awards ceremony. Shiltz is part of the Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), a college-based program for training commissioned officers of the United States armed forces. He also is an MSOE University Scholar and has maintained a cumulative GPA of 4.0.

Shiltz_Dylan.JPG.jpg

The SAME ROTC Award of Merit is a bronze medal with bronze key replica, and was authorized in 1948 to be awarded annually to outstanding junior and senior engineering students in the ROTC. A central military service board in each case selects the outstanding students for the awards from nominations submitted by the Professors of Military Science and Technology, Professors of Naval Science, and Professors of Aerospace Studies.

To be eligible for the award students must be a junior or senior engineering student actively enrolled in an ABET accredited school and in ROTC. Nominees must be in the top 25 percent of their engineering class and in the top 25 percent of their ROTC class. A maximum of 20 medals per service area (Air Force, Army and Navy) may be given. Shiltz was one of only two students who received this award in the Northwest Detachment.

“I’ve had Dylan in several classes and have worked closely with him on two different energy research projects,” said Dr. Christopher Damm, mechanical engineering professor. “Academically, Dylan is one of the best students I have known in 13 years of college teaching. He is also a gifted leader, with a quiet confidence that people respond to. He has a tremendously bright future ahead of him.”

Shiltz joined the Air Force ROTC for a number of reasons. “Like many engineering students, I am drawn to opportunities to work on exciting technology, and the Air Force offers engineering opportunities that simply cannot be found elsewhere,” he said. “I am also constantly seeking to challenge myself and develop my leadership skills. Most importantly, however, I feel extremely fortunate to live in a country where our security and freedoms are so well protected, in a world where this is not the case for many. I think it’s important that we each find our own way to give back to society, to take advantage of our opportunities, and to ensure that these opportunities are passed on to others.”

“I knew I wanted to pursue engineering before I had finished high school,” said Shiltz. “I took two Project Lead The Way courses, which helped me determine that mechanical engineering was my major of choice. As a Milwaukee native, MSOE seemed like a natural choice to pursue my undergraduate education.”

“Throughout my AFROTC experience, I have enjoyed the camaraderie with my fellow cadets more than anything. It’s very rewarding working with others who share your values and interests, facing challenges together, and learning from each other.”

After graduating from MSOE, Shiltz will attend MIT to earn a master’s degree in mechanical engineering. Ultimately, he plans to enter the active duty Air Force as a developmental engineer.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering will salute more than 425 undergraduate and graduate students at Spring Commencement on Saturday, May 24 at the Kern Center. Entrepreneurs Michael S. Erwin ’94 and Robert E. Vieau ’69 are the keynote speakers and will receive Honorary Doctor of Engineering degrees.

Dylan Shiltz is the class respondent, the honor that goes to the graduate with the highest GPA. Shiltz is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. He has maintained a cumulative GPA of 4.0, is an MSOE University Scholar, and a member of the Air Force ROTC. Shiltz recently received the Society of American Military Engineers ROTC Award of Merit.

Collin Matthews and Mollie Zuberbier will receive the Alumni Association Award. Recipients of this prestigious award are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving. Matthews, an electrical engineering major, is graduating with honors, and Zuberbier, an international business major, is graduating with high honors.

Honorary Degree Recipients:

Michael S. Erwin

MSOE Corporation member Michael S. Erwin graduated from MSOE in 1994 with a degree in management systems. He enthusiastically serves as the CEO of Tailored Label Products in Menomonee Falls, Wis., and is an investor in other regional manufacturing firms. Tailored Label Products is an award winning world class manufacturer and designer of product identification tags, labels, adhesive components and crowd control products. The company has been recognized as Wisconsin Manufacturer of the Year in 2005 and 2013, six-time winner of INC 5000’s Fastest Growing Company Award, a four-time winner of the Top 100 Best Workplaces in Milwaukee and six-time winner of the Best Printing Industry Workplaces in America.

Erwin serves on the boards of several engineering-intensive manufacturing businesses and non-profit organizations, including United Way of Waukesha County, Community Memorial Hospital Foundation and MSOE. He holds six patents, is a two-time winner of the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award and two-time winner of the BizTimes – BRAVO Entrepreneur Award and has been a senior guest lecturer for 15 years at MSOE. Erwin and his wife Nancy have been married for 37 years, with two grown daughters and two granddaughters.

Robert E. Vieau

MSOE Regent Robert E. Vieau graduated from MSOE in 1969 with a degree in electrical engineering. His degree from MSOE provided the academic credentials for his long career in high tech, with companies such as Texas Instruments (1969-1983) and Compaq Computer Corp. (1983-1991). At Compaq, Vieau served as the senior vice president of corporate operations and was responsible for global manufacturing of the desktop and portable computer lines with operations in Houston, Singapore and Scotland. There he demonstrated his management breadth, with ownership of an operating budget of over $300M, a capital budget of $100M and 5,000 employees worldwide. In addition, he was named to Business Month’s Management Dream Team in September 1989.

In 1993 Vieau moved to the Thomas-Conrad Corp., where he became president and CEO. He led the company through massive change, culminating in the successful acquisition of the company by Compaq Computer in 1995. He is also president and owner of Vieau and Company, through which he provides consulting services.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA), the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build, has announced that MSOE was one of ten regional winners of its third annual National Design-Build Student Competition. Seniors Donald Bogle, AE/CM; Jordan Borst, AE/MSST; Benjamin Ihlen, AE/MSST; and Zane Witt, AE/MSST are members of MSOE’s team, which is advised by Associate Professor Robert Lemke.

Student teams from leading design, construction and engineering universities across the country entered the competition to demonstrate design-build best practices by proposing a delivery solution to design and construct a more than 120,000-square-foot comprehensive recreation center on a college campus.

DBIA’s 2014 National Design-Build Student Competition Regional winners represent teams from California State University, Long Beach, Colorado State University, Iowa State University, MSOE, New School of Architecture & Design, Roger Williams University, University of Florida, University of Oklahoma, and University of Washington

Regional juries, comprised of industry veteran professionals, selected the 10 regional winners for the first phase of the competition based on their Request for Qualifications (RFQ) submissions, which advance them to the second phase of the competition. In the second phase, a Request for Proposals (RFP) will be released to each finalist team. From this pool of finalists, the top teams will be invited to present their proposals before an expert panel on Oct. 4 during the 2014 Design-Build Conference and Expo in Dallas, Texas. The final winners will be announced and presented awards at the Conference.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

wentz_blake_web.jpgDr. Blake Wentz has been named chair of the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management (CAECM) Department at Milwaukee School of Engineering, effective Fall 2014. Wentz joined the faculty at MSOE in 2005. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance and a Master of Science degree in Engineering from the University of Nebraska. He has a Ph.D. in Construction Management from Indiana State and his areas of specialization are construction law and mechanical systems.

Since 2008, Wentz has served as the construction management program director at MSOE. He is the faculty advisor for the Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA) Student Chapter, whose competition teams have qualified for the national finals several times, winning the national title in 2011 and 2013. They were finalists in 2012 and 2014.

Wentz was named the Educator of the Year for 2008 by Wisconsin Builder Magazine, was the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) National Educator of the Year in 2010 and was named MCAA Educator of the Year in 2011 and 2012. In 2013 he was the AGC Associate of the Year. He is also involved in consulting activities and has been an expert witness for construction legal disputes as well as being a keynote speaker for various organizations and is an instructor for the AGC of Wisconsin’s Leadership and Business Management program, teaching the ethics component of that course. Wentz is a co-author of a textbook on Construction and Engineering Law that was released in 2013 in which he authored the ethics chapter of the book.

Currently, Wentz is serving as the owner’s representative for the MSOE Tower Apartments construction project. The student residence tower is slated to open this fall and features studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments for upperclassmen and graduate students.

Prior to becoming a college professor, Wentz owned and operated his family’s mechanical contracting business, Wentz Plumbing and Heating, in Lincoln, Neb.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

NACC_Award.jpgThe Northern Athletics Collegiate Conference announced that MSOE has won the 2013-14 NACC Men’s All-Sports Award. The Raiders had a 9.69 index over eight NACC-sponsored sports to claim the award over Aurora and Concordia Wisconsin with an 8.94 index each. The conference gives points based on regular season and post-season finish and averages those points out among the number of sponsored sports.

“I’m very proud of our student-athletes and coaches for this accomplishment,” MSOE Director of Athletics Dan Harris said. “We have strived for many years to be a well-rounded department that finds success across a number of sports, instead of just one or two standout programs. I think this award validates our efforts and I could not be more proud.”

MSOE posted top-three finishes in six of its eight sports to win its first All-Sports Award ever. The Red and White teams competed for an award in the Lake Michigan Conference from 1992-2006 and in the NACC since the 2006-07 season. The Men’s Teams claimed a regular-season title in tennis, runner-up finishes in basketball, cross country, both indoor and outdoor track & field, and a third-place finish by the golf team.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Five members of the MSOE Bowling Team were named Academic All-Americans by the National Collegiate Bowling Coaches Association for the 2013-14 season. To qualify for this award, bowlers must have a 3.5 cumulative GPA. The team is coached by Stephanie Parrish ’03.

Congratulations to:

  • Donald Deda, mechanical engineering major
  • Brandon DuPrey, computer engineering major
  • Kyle Kallhauge, mechanical engineering major
  • Dylan Keegan, software engineering major
  • Turner Swanson, mechanical engineering major and team captain

2014_Bowling.jpg

Back row, left to right: Coach Stephanie Parrish '03, Kyle Kallhauge, Turner Swanson, Donald Deda.
Front row, left to right: Brandon DuPrey, Dylan Keegan

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.