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MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student chapter is one of four finalists in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition. This is the fourth straight year they have qualified and this year will be defending their national title. Twenty-four universities from across the U.S. and Canada submitted entries. Teams had to submit proposals on a project involving the installation of the HVAC and plumbing systems in the Pilot Plant Expansion at the Sports Protein Inc. facility in Chicago. Bidders were also encouraged to propose design features that exceed LEED Platinum requirements and a post-construction service component.

MSOE’s team will travel to Scottsdale, Ariz., in March to present their proposals at MCAA’s national convention. They will compete against Sacramento State University, Southern Polytechnic State University, and University of Maryland – College Park.

Tyler Mrowiec (MCAA student president), Haily Fernald (MCAA student vice president), Evan Crayford, Ray Schwalbe, Jason Stauber and Sami Wallace will give a 15-minute presentation and answer questions in front of a panel of mechanical contractors and conference attendees. Several other students worked on the proposal and will attend the conference and competition as alternates: Sarabeth Haworth, Rachel Lynde and Gretchen Toshach. Dr. Blake Wentz, associate professor and construction management program director in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

grohmann_trains.jpgTrains That Passed in the Night: Railroad Photographs of O. Winston Link will be on display at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from Jan. 17 through April 27, 2014.

Organized by Thomas H. Garver and produced in collaboration with the Center for Railroad Photography and Art in Madison (www.railphoto-art.org), this exhibition features 36 framed, original prints signed by the photographer. O. Winston Link, a Brooklyn, New York, native and commercial photographer became well-recognized for his complex images of factory and industrial plant interiors. For Link, the steam railroad was a vital ingredient to “the good life’ in America, an essential part of the fabric of our lives. It is this quality—of life, not machinery—which he captures so artfully in his photographs.

Link’s photographs showcase the final years of steam railroading on the Norfolk & Western Railway, the last major railroad in America to operate exclusively with steam power. They are regarded as one of the best records of this long vanished type of locomotion, yet the broad appeal of Link’s photographs is derived not so much from the images of the steam locomotives themselves, but from the way in which their inclusion expresses the photographer’s deeply felt respect for the quality of life that the steam railroad reflected and supported for so many years in the United States.

A special Gallery Night and Day Event will be held to celebrate the opening of the exhibition. The museum will extend its hours on Friday, Jan. 17 from 5 to 9 p.m. and offer free admission. Garver, the curator of the exhibition, will give a presentation at 7 p.m.  The museum is also offering free admission on Saturday, Jan. 18 from noon to 6 p.m.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

WMSE 91.7FM will hold its 12th annual Rockabilly Chili Contest fundraiser at the MSOE Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway, on Sunday, March 2 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 60 Milwaukee restaurants, cafes and caterers will compete against one another to determine the city’s best chili as voted on by event attendees.

Awards are given to winners in five different categories: best meat, best vegetarian, most unique chili, best heat, and best vendor display/presentation. The 2014 event features an expanded venue that includes the first floor gymnasium and the second floor field house, resulting in much greater seating and dining space.

New this year, the Milwaukee Fire Department will be participating (they’ll be judged separately by local celebrity judges). In addition, there will be chili pepper races, live music and a children’s area run by Artists Working in Education.

Advance tickets are $12, include 4 chili samples and can be purchased online or at WMSE, 820 N. Milwaukee St. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Children ages 10 and under are free. Additional chili sampling tickets can be purchased at the event for $1 each. Bring two or more non-perishable food items for the Hunger Task Force and receive two additional sample tickets. Tickets at the door (if available) will be $15.

Discounted tickets are available in advance to MSOE students ($5) and MSOE faculty and staff ($10) at the WMSE studios in Krueger Hall.

Thanks to the Kern Family Foundation, students, alumni, faculty and staff at Milwaukee School of Engineering enjoyed a special presentation by James Davison Hunter, author of “The Death of Character: Moral Education in an Age Without Good or Evil,” on Dec. 17.

In his book, Hunter traces the death of character to the disintegration of the moral and social conditions that make character possible in the first place. The dilemma he uncovers is especially acute in the realm of moral education, where society explicitly takes on the task of instilling enduring moral commitments and ideals within young people. The various strategies for accomplishing this task—psychological, communitarian and traditionalist—all operate, in the end, within a framework that renders the goal unachievable.

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) held a Fluid Power Challenge on Dec. 9 at MSOE. Teams of eighth-grade students competed to solve a fluid power challenge by designing and constructing a mechanism that used fluid power technology. Twenty-four teams participated, making it the largest competition to date. Participating schools included: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, Milwaukee; Carter’s Christian Academy, Milwaukee; Fox River Middle School, Waterford, Wis.; Golda Meir School, Milwaukee; Humboldt Park School, Milwaukee; Lake Shore Middle School, Mequon; Lincoln Center of the Arts Middle School, Milwaukee; Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, Casco, Wis.; Mitchell Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Oak Creek West Middle School, Oak Creek, Wis.; Silverbrook Middle School, West Bend, Wis.; Starbuck Middle School, Racine, Wis.; and Steffen Middle School, Mequon, Wis

Congratulations to all who participated. The winners were:

Overall Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team B, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Portfolio Champion: Starbuck Middle School, Team A, coached by Phillip Kiley
Design Champion: Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, coached by Joe Kempke
Team Work Champion: Carter’s Christian Academy, coached by John Wamser
Team Challenge Champion: Mitchell Middle School Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Honorable Mention: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, coached by Adam Reynolds

IMG_3212.JPG.jpgAt a workshop in November, the students were given the assignment of designing and constructing a fluid power mechanism to perform a defined task. The mechanisms were required to use fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) to pick up weighted objects, and then place them on a platform for various point totals.

After working for four weeks, the teams came together again to compete against each other in a two-minute competition. Engineers from area companies served as judges, who graded the teams and presented awards in six categories-Overall Champion, Design Champion, Teamwork Champion, Portfolio Champion, Team Challenge Champion, and Honorable Mention.

The program is designed to introduce students, and their teachers, to the world of engineering and careers in fluid power. Through the Fluid Power Challenges, the NFPA hopes to encourage students to select more mathematics and science courses in their high school curricula to keep their options open for technology-based post-secondary studies.

MSOE School of Engineering and its Fluid Power InstituteTM would like to congratulate all of the students and teachers who were involved in the competition. To learn more about the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge, call (414) 778-3347.

NFPA provides a forum for the fluid power industry's channel partners-manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, customers and educators. Its 330+ U.S. and multinational members work cooperatively in advancing hydraulic and pneumatic technology through the association's many programs and initiatives.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Master’s program at Milwaukee School of Engineering will blend clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework and international experience

To close achievement gaps not only between America’s lowest and highest performing schools but between our top-performing schools and those around the world, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced today the creation of a new MBA school leadership program at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). The new program for preparing principals will blend college coursework and a tailored business curriculum with intensive clinical experience in schools, corporations, and nonprofits, and involvement in innovative schools abroad.

The Woodrow Wilson (WW) MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership will recruit and prepare experienced educators, who will take 12 to 15 months of executive-style MBA courses. The program, one of the first in the nation, will be offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and will be equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will drive innovation in schools, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international standards, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time.

"Recent studies show that principals’ and superintendents’ jobs are increasing in challenge and complexity, and yet many programs around the nation that prepare school leaders still don’t fully address those challenges,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “We need a new way of thinking about how school leaders learn to address the issues they now face. This new MBA approach is intended not only to prepare strong leaders for Wisconsin, but also to provide a new national model. It will demonstrate how a high-value education MBA can replace the M.Ed. for principals and give Wisconsin school leaders the wherewithal to be more effective.”

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, candidates will be nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows selected will have demonstrated key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. They will receive a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with mentoring and opportunities for international experience in innovative schools in other countries. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified schools for at least three years.

“MSOE offers a very pragmatic and hands-on education. Our students learn to identify and solve problems and create long-lasting solutions. We have a proven track record of graduating students who have career practice and are able to immediately apply what they’ve learned,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “It is a natural fit for MSOE to be offering the MBA in Education Leadership and enabling school leaders to drive innovation. We are raising the bar in education standards and schools that have WW MBA graduates on staff will greatly benefit.”

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership program addresses twin problems in American education: On the one hand, well-resourced U.S. schools still rank below schools in countries like Finland and Singapore on measures of student achievement. On the other hand, too many of the nation’s high-need urban and rural schools still fall too far below domestic benchmarks for student achievement.

Two institutions—MSOE and the University of Indianapolis—are participating in the launch of the WW MBA in Education Leadership program. The MSOE program will focus entirely on eradicating the international achievement gap. According to McKinsey & Company, the United States’ economy loses as much as $2 trillion annually because its schools lag behind those in such countries as Finland and Singapore.

The national director of the program, LeAnn Buntrock, previously headed the acclaimed education leadership program at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. Based at the Foundation’s Princeton, N.J. office, Dr. Buntrock oversees the Indianapolis and Milwaukee programs as well as several expansion efforts currently under consideration. She has worked closely with Dr. Levine to shape and implement the program in accord with his previous findings.

“As schools face a wide array of changes, school leaders have to find new ways to engage strong teachers and help them drive student achievement. What makes the WW MBA Fellowship distinctive is that it really focuses on transformational leadership—different techniques for spotting and diagnosing issues, solving problems, motivating others to go beyond the status quo,” said Dr. Buntrock. “It’s also very unusual for leadership programs around the country to partner with school districts and education organizations to identify relevant projects that will give candidates actual in-school experiences, as this program will.”

MSOE will partner with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements—that is, in-school learning arrangements—and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows. Fifteen Fellows will be selected for the program, with the first class announced in late spring 2014 and beginning the program in summer 2014. The candidates the program will produce, say local officials, are the kind of leaders their schools need.

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state Teaching Fellowship, which recruits very able candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools, and also works to transform teacher education. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in four states with 23 universities.

Applications to the WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership are available by nomination only. To learn more about the program at MSOE, visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership. Go to http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation.

The program is under review for approval by the Higher Learning Commission, with a final decision expected in summer 2014. It is also under review by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction with a decision expected by early 2014.

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation www.woodrow.org identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee School of Engineering (www.msoe.edu) is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering has announced nine former student-athletes will make up the 2014 induction class into the MSOE Athletic Hall of Fame.

Chris Boardman '05, Catherine Chappell '08, Benjamin Herrmann '07, Leah Leja '08, Jeff Mikos '06, Scott Murphy '08, Ryan Shefchik '02, Brian Soik '07 and Lee Swallow '09 will be inducted during a ceremony and banquet Feb. 8, 2014 at the Kern Center.

More information is available on the Go-Raiders.com athletics website.

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) is seeking comments from the public about the university in preparation for its periodic evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The university will host a visit April 7-9, 2014, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.  MSOE has been accredited by the Commission since 1971. The team will review the institution’s ongoing ability to meet the Commission’s Criteria for Accreditation.

The public is invited to submit comments regarding the university to:

Public Comment on the Milwaukee School of Engineering
The Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL  60604-1411

The public may also submit comments on the Commission’s website at www.ncahlc.org. (Click on the “Resources for the Public” link and a link to the on-line third-party comment form appears approximately half way down the page.)

Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by Feb. 15, 2014.

Congratulations to all of the students who were named to the 2013 Fall Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean's List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive "high honors." Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean's List.

Dean's List (pdf)   |   Honors List (pdf)

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

More than 70 teams of high school students put their computer, math and science skills to the test during Milwaukee School of Engineering’s annual Opportunity Conference in November. The OP Conference gives high school students the opportunity to demonstrate excellence in academic pursuits.

“OP”portunity Computer Conference
1st place: Parker High School (Team B), Janesville, Wis.
2nd place: Fort Atkinson High School (Team A), Fort Atkinson, Wis.
3rd place: Fort Atkinson High School (Team B), Fort Atkinson, Wis.
3rd place: Whitewater High School, Whitewater, Wis.

“OP”portunity Math Conference
1st place: Lake Forest Academy (Team A), Lake Forest, Ill.
2nd place: Marquette University High School, Milwaukee
3rd place: Whitefish Bay High School, Whitefish Bay, Wis.

“OP”portunity Science Conference
1st place: Vernon Hills High School, Vernon Hills, Ill.
2nd place: Libertyville High School (Team A), Libertyville, Ill.
3rd place: Arrowhead High School (Team A), Hartland, Wis.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

U.S. News & World Report released its inaugural rankings of the Best Colleges for Veterans, and Milwaukee School of Engineering was ranked 7th Best University in the Midwest for Veterans.

This latest ranking is in addition to the academic recognition MSOE received from U.S. News. Earlier this year, MSOE was named 21st Best University in the Midwest, 10th Best Undergraduate Engineering Program among engineering schools whose highest degree is a bachelor’s or master’s, and 7th Best Electrical Engineering Program nationwide by U.S. News.

About the rankings:

U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges for Veterans rankings help veterans pursue a college education under the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The new rankings provide data and information on schools that offer federal benefits, including tuition and housing assistance, to veterans and active service members.

All of the Best Colleges for Veterans scored well in terms of graduation rate, faculty resources, reputation and other markers of academic quality in the 2014 edition of the U.S. News Best Colleges. To qualify for the new rankings, the schools had to be certified for the GI Bill and participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program and Service members Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium.

In total, there were 234 ranked schools across all 10 U.S. News ranking categories: National Universities, National Liberal Arts Colleges, Regional Universities (North, South, Midwest and West) and Regional Colleges (North, South, Midwest and West). For further details on how the rankings were calculated, see the methodology.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Seventy undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Fall Commencement, Saturday, Nov. 23, at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from MSOE Regent G. Woodrow “Woodie” Adkins. Adkins also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Business and Economics degree.

Paula Bohl is the class respondent. Bohl is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management. Laura Matthew, who is graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, will receive the Alumni Association Award. The award which is given to a student who has made time in his or her hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award.

About Woodie Adkins:

Woodrow “Woodie” Adkins received a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture education and economics from the University of Maryland. After graduation he joined Swift and Company, one of the largest meat industry companies, where he became vice president of marketing and sales for branded product. He was recruited to Wisconsin as president of a $20 million meat business that grew to $250 million. Following that period, he was majority owner of two manufacturing companies and co-founder of an investment fund.

Adkins is an MSOE Regent and the first chair of the Uihlein/Spitzer Center for Entrepreneurship at MSOE Rader School of Business since 2004. He assists the faculty in developing programs and courses as a resource for students and alumni in their entrepreneurial endeavors. He enjoys interacting with students and sharing lessons learned from his business experiences.

Currently Adkins is a managing partner of FCF Funds L.P., a private equity fund that invests in manufacturing companies, and manages his own private investment entity, Adkins Holdings LLC. He is a current member of the International Chief Executives Organization (CEO), past chairman of Wisconsin YPO, and a previous director of International Young Presidents Organization. His interests outside of business include activities with family and friends, motorcycle touring and upland game hunting.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE Athletic Field low-res.jpgThe new athletic field and parking complex at Milwaukee School of Engineering has officially been named Pamela and Hermann Viets Field in honor of the university’s president and his wife. Dr. Robert Kern suggested the name during the grand opening and dedication of the complex in August to recognize Dr. Hermann Viets’ unwavering persistence in pursuing the project and improving MSOE and Milwaukee’s Park East Corridor. The MSOE Board of Regents unanimously approved the name during their annual meeting in October.

Viets Field, located at 1305 N. Broadway, features an athletic field constructed on top of an in-ground, 780-car parking facility. The field is used for collegiate soccer, lacrosse, rugby and youth sports. As an extension of the Kern Center, it further supports MSOE’s commitment to student wellness and development as a whole person. In addition, there is 12,000 square feet of retail space and a small ground-level public park on the northern end of the site. The $30 million project is the first major development of its kind in the Park East Corridor. The development was largely supported with a very generous donation from Drs. Robert and Patricia Kern.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

John J. Allen (Jack), Stephen G. Booth, Daniel J. Moceri, James C. Rahn and Neal K. Wunderlich have joined the Board of Regents at Milwaukee School of Engineering. In addition, five individuals were added as MSOE Corporation members.

JackAllen.jpgJohn J. Allen (Jack) ’80 is the executive vice president and chief operating officer of Navistar International Corp. in Lisle, Ill. He was named to the position on April 16, 2013. Allen has served at Navistar for more than 30 years, and in that time, he has held numerous leadership positions in nearly every key area of the company. Most recently, Allen was president of North America Truck and Parts.  Prior to that, he was president of Navistar’s Engine Group. Allen also led global expansion efforts in China and India by establishing partnerships and joint ventures with industry leaders in those countries. Allen has also served as vice president and general manager of the company’s Parts organization and was vice president and general manager of the Blue Diamond Truck Company, a joint venture with The Ford Motor Company. His additional roles include vice president, sales, of the company’s Western Region and vice president, marketing and product development, of Navistar’s Heavy Vehicle Center. He joined the company in 1981 as a design engineer. Allen holds a Bachelor of Science in Architectural and Building Construction Engineering Technology from MSOE. He also serves on the boards of Valspar Inc. and Chicago’s Lurie Children’s Hospital.

SteveBooth.jpgStephen G. Booth is the chief operating officer and director of investment banking for Robert W. Baird & Co. in Milwaukee. Booth oversees Baird’s global corporate finance and M&A activities. He also co-manages Baird’s Equity Capital Markets Group and is a member of the board of directors and executive committee of Robert W. Baird & Co. Booth has extensive experience originating and directing M&A and equity financing transactions in a wide variety of industries. Before heading Baird’s Investment Banking Group, he previously led its Global M&A business and prior to that, its Industrials Group. Prior to joining Baird in 1994, Booth was at Kidder, Peabody & Co. in its Chicago Corporate Finance Office. Booth received his Master of Management degree, with distinction, from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and holds bachelor’s degrees in finance and economics, magna cum laude, from Southern Methodist University.

DanielMoceri.jpgDaniel J. Moceri ’76 is the chief executive officer of Convergint Technologies in Schaumburg, Ill. Moceri has more than 35 years of experience in the electronic security, fire alarm and life safety, and building management systems industry. Prior to starting Convergint Technologies, Moceri was the president of Siemens Building Technologies Security Division for North America. During the span of his career, he has held positions in marketing, engineering, and executive management focused on integrated building management systems throughout the United States and Canada. Moceri holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering Technology from MSOE and a master’s degree in management from Northwestern University. Active in professional and civic organizations, Moceri is a member of the American Society for Industrial Security, a member of the Canada-US Business Council, an advisory board member for Techsec Solutions, and is actively involved as a board member of his local church.

JamesRahn.jpgJames C. Rahn is president of the Kern Family Foundation in Waukesha, Wis. He became president of the Kern Family Foundation in February 2008. In this role, he provides direction for expanding existing programs and establishing new programs in support of the foundation’s mission to build the future through values, education and innovation. He joined the foundation in September 2007 as the education reform program director. Before to that, he spent six years as director of the Center for Urban Teaching and assistant professor of education at Wisconsin Lutheran College. Prior to his work in higher education, he served in K-12 Lutheran schools as teacher, principal and regional school coordinator. Rahn holds a bachelor’s degree from Dr. Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minn., and a master’s degree from Concordia University in River Forest, Ill. Rahn is affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute, Charter School Growth Fund Inc., Compass Educational Partners Inc., EAGLE South Mountain Charter Inc., EAGLE South Mountain Property Inc., Educational Enterprises Inc., Educational Enterprises Real Estate Holding Co. LLC, HOPE Christian Schools Inc., and Project Lead the Way.

NealWunderlich.jpgNeal K. Wunderlich, P.E. ’73, ’74 is president of Wunderlich-Malec Engineering in Minnetonka, Minn., a company he founded in 1982. The company provides customers with engineering, systems integration and fabrication solutions. It has grown to include more than 250 employees in offices throughout the United States and in Saudi Arabia. Wunderlich holds an associate degree in Electrical Power Engineering Technology and a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering Technology from MSOE. He also earned a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from UW-Milwaukee and is a registered professional engineer in 34 states.

 

 

Curt Culver, Dr. Willie D. Davis, Dr. Eckhart G. Grohmann, Scott Moon and Dr. William D. Van Dyke III return to the Board of Regents from Regents Emeriti status. Regents Allen J. Carlson ’79 and Frank M. Jaehnert are now Regents Emeriti.

New Corporation members include:

  • Bill Berrien, CEO, Invictus Enterprises, New Berlin, Wis.
  • Richard Galling ’75, president and chief operating officer, Hammes Company, Brookfield, Wis.
  • Jennifer Hansen, president, Anderson Seal Inc. (The Anderson Group), New Berlin, Wis.
  • Lauri Rollings, executive director, Plumbing Mechanical Sheet Metal Contractor’s Alliance, Milwaukee
  • Larry Schmidt, Sr., chairman and founder, Lakeland Supply Inc., Waukesha, Wis.

 

Since it was founded in 1903, MSOE has benefitted from the advice and support of volunteer leaders. Meaningful involvement is the most accurate way to describe the manner in which MSOE’s Board of Regents and Corporation members assume their responsibilities. Comprised of representatives of business, industry, government and education, the Board of Regents governs the operations and the future planning of the university.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Four teams of architectural engineering and construction management students from Milwaukee School of Engineering traveled to the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) Region 3 Conference and Student Competitions in October. They competed in three national competitions: preconstruction, electrical and healthcare; and one regional competition: design/build.

For each competition the teams receive a request for proposal (RFP) for a real project at 7 a.m. and have 16 hours to turn in their proposal at 11 p.m. The following morning they present their solution to a panel of judges, which usually includes individuals who were involved in the actual project.

National Champion: Preconstruction Team

The Preconstruction Team won the National Open Championship, in which 11 teams competed. This competition was sponsored by Pepper Construction and included teams from Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo, Purdue University and University of Houston.
Team members: Brett Foster, Megan Hayes, Trevor Koziczkowski, Bryan Makatura, Ryan Moldenhauer, Jill Vande Boom
Coach: Dr. Jeong Woo

Regional Champion: Design/Build Team

The Design/Build Team won the regional title, defeating teams such as Ferris State, University of Cincinnati and Illinois State University. A total of seven teams participated in the competition, sponsored by McCarthy Construction.
Team members: Donnie Bogle, Jordan Borst, Nick Gottlieb, Ben Ihlen, Tyler Mrowiec, Zane Witt
Coaches: Dr. Blake Wentz and Robert Lemke

National Runner-Up: Electrical Team

The Electrical Team was the runner-up in the National Open Competition, finishing behind Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo and in front of Purdue University.
Team members: Nick Cote, Neree Croteau, Zach Dawiec, Courtney Leaf, Cory Miklas, Karina Zarate
Coach: Dr. Blake Wentz

For the first time ever, MSOE entered the National Healthcare Competition. The team did not place in the top three, but students gained valuable experience and plan to compete again next year. Team members were Will Backes, Sarah Bower, Elizabeth Crawford, Christian Mueller, Jake Roberts and Morgan Squires. They were coached by Dr. Gulbin Ozcan-Deniz.

Since entering the competition in 1999, MSOE has had 21 top three places in national student competitions and 10 national championship teams. No other university in the country has experienced the consistent level of success demonstrated by MSOE.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students celebrating its 110th anniversary. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.