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mercker.jpgErich Mercker: Painter of Industry is on display at the Grohmann Museum Sept. 5 through Dec. 14. In conjunction with the October release of Erich Mercker and Technical Subjects: A Landscape and Industrial Artist in Twentieth-Century Germany, MSOE associate professor, author and guest curator Dr. Patrick Jung presents his selection of Mercker’s work from the museum’s permanent collection. New perspectives on the artist’s life, career and art are presented in this captivating exhibition of a master of industrial painting.

Museum guests are invited to a special gallery talk event with guest Jung during Gallery Night and Day. Jung’s talk will take place Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for the event.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,700 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

WWMBA_Photo_4x6.jpgIn response to a growing need to better prepare school and district leaders for today’s challenges and opportunities, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced its inaugural class of Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership in Wisconsin. The MBA Fellowship program charts a new course in education leader preparation, blending clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework to ensure graduates have the knowledge, skills, and character to both lead and close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between the country’s top-performing schools and those around the world.

Wisconsin is one of the first two states to launch the Woodrow Wilson (WW) MBA Fellowships. The Woodrow Wilson Foundation is partnering with Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) on the initiative, which provides school leaders with a blend of graduate coursework and a tailored MBA curriculum.

“As a nation, we must do a better job preparing our future school and district leaders,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “What we did in the past will no longer suffice. We need new approaches and new preparation that addresses where our schools and classrooms are headed. These Wisconsin MBA Fellows are not only committed to improving education and closing the achievement gap in Wisconsin, but they will be leaders in a new national movement to dramatically improve how we prepare educators.”

The Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership recruits and prepares experienced educators, who will take 13 months of executive-style MBA courses. The program, one of the first two in the nation, is offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and is equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will create school cultures to drive innovation in schools, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international levels, create school cultures to foster citizens of good character, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time. Wisconsin joins Indiana as the first two states to embrace this new approach to school leadership. Each Fellow was selected from a highly competitive pool of nominees.

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, candidates were nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows were selected based on key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. Each receives a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with executive coaching and opportunities for international experience in innovative schools in other countries. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified districts/schools for at least three years.

MSOE is partnering with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements (in-school learning arrangements) and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows.

“We are pleased to welcome the Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows to MSOE. Our new degree program raises the bar in education standards, and these Fellows are committed to improving student performance in Wisconsin,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “At MSOE we prepare our students to be leaders, and the Fellows are no exception. They’re highly qualified school leaders who are going to be change agents.”

Levine, MSOE President Viets, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch, honored Wisconsin’s first class of Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows at an event at MSOE on Sept. 4, 2014.

“Wisconsin has a proud history leading the nation in ground-breaking education reforms.  This new fellowship program is an exciting addition to that tradition of innovation and educational excellence.  By combining best practices from the business world and the classroom, MSOE’s MBA in Education Leadership will equip Wisconsin’s school principals and superintendents to better teach our children, lead their staffs, and steward taxpayer dollars,” Kleefisch said.

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state Teaching Fellowship, which works to transform teacher education and recruit very able candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in five states with 28 universities.

Visit http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation. To learn more about the program at MSOE visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,700 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI, average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Profiles: 2014 Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership

Kourtney Bauswell
Dean of Curriculum & Instruction, Milwaukee Collegiate Academy
B.A., political science and sociology, Purdue University
M.Ed., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Former social studies teacher, social studies content team leader, and instructional coach, Hmong American Peace Academy; Emerging Leader Fellow, Schools That Can—Milwaukee; participant, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management’s Executive Education Program; former Teach for America corps member.

Lyndee Belanger
Junior Academy Achievement Director, Milwaukee Academy of Science
B.S., elementary education, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.S., curriculum and instruction, Lesley University
Former middle school reading and language arts teacher; former lead teacher for middle school; former administrator for grades 6–12 and member of the school leadership team; as Achievement Director, curriculum and assessment leader, teacher coach, and advisor on best practices; 2010 Teacher of the Year, Wisconsin Charter Schools Association.

Lindsay Cialdini
Second-Grade Teacher and Curriculum Coordinator/Technology Chair, Slinger School District
B.S., elementary education/mathematics, Drake University
M.Ed., curriculum and instruction (integrated teaching through the arts), Lesley University
Former first-grade teacher, urban Washington, D.C.; ten-year teaching veteran; math curriculum coordinator; participant in Wisconsin Statewide Mathematics Institute, focusing on professional development for K–12 mathematics teachers in implementing the Common Core State Standards; Presidential Scholarship recipient;.

Dan Gebauer
Teaching and Learning Specialist/Technology Coach, Elmbrook Schools
B.S., criminal justice, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.Ed., Cardinal Stritch University
National Board Certified middle childhood generalist; coach for 300+ educators in the use of various teaching/learning technologies and web-based assessment and learning systems; ten-year teaching veteran; district leader/committee member, mathematics education, assessment, professional development, and teacher coaching; invited presenter, Wisconsin Education Innovations and other conferences; former police officer.

Erik Herbrechtsmeier
Math Teacher, Middle and High School, Kenosha Unified School District
B.A., mathematics/ secondary education, Carthage College
M.S., mathematics education, Walden University
Teacher at Kenosha Unified since 2001; teacher mentor, lead technology developer, former mathematics department chair (Indian Trail High School and Academy); adjunct instructor, Gateway Technical College (Kenosha).

Lalenunat M. Johnson
Assistant Principal/Director of Teacher Leadership, North Point Lighthouse Charter School
B.A., management and communications, Concordia University, WI
M.S., education policy and leadership, Marquette University, WI
Former teacher at Milwaukee College Preparatory School, where she taught 5th through 8th grade history, as well as 5th and 6th grade math, reading, writing and science. Started in education as a volunteer and educational assistant and worked her way through college to become a teacher; former Teach for America corps member.

Rodney Lynk Jr.
Assistant Principal, Rocketship Southside Community Prep
B.S., finance and risk management insurance, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
M.S., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Leader/coach for early childhood department, K4 and K5, and math at Rocketship Southside; 2012 “Rocketeer of the Year” in his charter organization for outstanding student achievement; recipient, Sontag Urban Education Prize; leader in bringing Rocketship to Milwaukee; founding Milwaukee corps member, Teach for America.

Kris MacDonald
Dean of Students and School Culture, Carmen Middle/High School of Science and Technology, Northwest Campus
B.S., psychology/global cultures, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
Educator in Wisconsin, California, and abroad; former Teach for America corps member in Southern California; former bilingual educator in Costa Rica; former Corps member Advisor and School Director for TFA Summer Institutes; student life facilitator with focus on character development.

Amanda Mehr
Director of Curriculum & Instruction, Carmen Middle/High School of Science and Technology, Northwest Campus
B.A., writing intensive English/political science, Marquette University
M.S., educational policy and leadership, Marquette University
Former Teach for American corps member at Carmen; creator of school’s first Advanced Placement English curriculum and 9th-grade grammar/composition course; former TFA Secondary Language Arts Content Team Leader; former Assistant Director of Pre-Service Training, Milwaukee Teaching Fellows; member, Schools That Can—Milwaukee.

Megan C. Miller
Special Education Teacher and founding staff member, Milwaukee College Prep
B.A., biomedical science, Marquette University
M.Ed., Cardinal Stritch University
Leader in creating the special education program at Milwaukee College Prep; Emerging Leader Fellow, Schools That Can—Milwaukee; curriculum and assessment designer for transition to the Common Core State Standards, helping to lead professional development  in implementing the new curriculum; former Teach for America corps member.

Al Moroder
Business Education Teacher, New Berlin West Middle & High Schools
B.S., business management and marketing, Concordia University—Wisconsin
Creator of new high school personal finance curriculum; data-driven instructor who brings that approach to his students; head football coach, taking team to playoffs for the first time in nearly 15 years; pitching/catching coach for state champion baseball team; committed student life volunteer.

Megan Rindal
High School Special Education/Transition Coordinator, Elmbrook School District
B.A., University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire
M.S., vocational rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Former job coach for individuals with disabilities; special education teacher, leader and consultant with 11 years of k-12 experience; creator of innovative transitioning program for district; teacher and department coach for effective practices in special education;  led efforts to partner with local universities to provide needed resources and support to district teachers and staff.

Nasif K. Rogers
AVID District Director and Instructional Coach, Nicolet Unified High School District
B.A., history/social studies/educational studies, Ripon College
M.Ed., teaching, learning, and leadership, Cardinal Stritch University
Former social studies teacher; former debate/forensics coach; participant on pilot team for the state’s new Educator Effectiveness system; director of AVID program to close achievement gaps and ensure college readiness; crisis stabilizer/youth mentor for one of Milwaukee County’s wraparound service providers; senior director of the Empowerment Network, a local social entrepreneurship initiative.

Michele Vraney
Elementary Literacy Specialist, Mequon-Thiensville School District
B.A., Concordia University, WI
M.S., language and literacy, Cardinal Stritch University
Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade teacher, including team leader of the fifth grade; leader of district’s first-ever team recipient of teaching excellence award; recipient of district’s Outstanding Educator and Writing Teacher of the Year awards; recipient of Range Line Excellence in Teaching Award; recipient of a Herb Kohl Fellowship Award; adjunct professor, Concordia University’s graduate teacher certification program; 24-year veteran in education.

Jack Wallace
Manager, Teacher Leadership Development, Teach for America (Milwaukee)
B.A., history, Yale University
Teacher coach for first- and second-year Teach for America teachers across Milwaukee, including both the Milwaukee Public Schools and Milwaukee’s charter and choice districts; former eighth-grade reading and language arts teacher; former eighth-grade team leader; former football coach; former Teach for America corps member.

radio_education_original.jpgA History of Radio at MSOE” is now available to the public through MSOE’s Walter Schroeder Library’s digital collections. Resources in the collection document the fascinating evolution of radio and how it affected the university, its students, and radio in the greater Milwaukee area. From photos and school publications to articles and promotional materials, there are more than 1,000 pieces in the digital collection available for online browsing.

MSOE was established in 1903 by Oscar Werwath, and in his classes he taught students how to make crystal radio sets. By the mid-1920s, students were so interested in radio they formed a radio club and the educational radio classes became a separate branch of study.

As radio technology advanced, so did the curriculum and students’ involvement. They had an amateur (ham) radio station, 9SO, and broadcast station WIAO (later WSOE) which was used for broadcasting music, lectures and school activities. In 1928, WSOE was purchased by the Wisconsin News Network and became WISN. In the 1930s the Radio Club made contact with an Antarctic exhibition and Russia.

By the 1940s, televisions became affordable for the masses and student interest shifted. MSOE’s radio education curriculum was expanded to include television repair classes. The radio club regained momentum in 1949 and changed its call sign to W9HHX.

The 1950s and 60s saw many partnerships between MSOE and WISN radio and WISN-TV to produce several shows, most notably “Education on Parade,” “Challenge” and “Sounds of Science.” In 1967, the student clubs began discussion about setting up an official campus radio station. And in 1968, what had begun strictly as radio curriculum became the Electronic Communications Engineering technology degree program at MSOE.

MSOE’s official radio station, WMSE-FM began broadcasting alternative and free-form music programming in 1981 thanks to a generous donation from alumnus Everett Cobb. More than 30 years of WMSE history are also included in the digital collection.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Greenheck1.jpgMSOE students, alumni, faculty and staff will have a fun, one-day opportunity to learn about the HVAC industry on Tuesday, Sept. 9 when the Greenheck AirTour Learning Center arrives on campus.

Greenheck Fan Corporation’s multimedia mobile learning center, housed in a semi-trailer, travels across the country and offers engineers an opportunity to learn more about the non-residential heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry. The MSOE community is invited to see live demonstrations of some of Greenheck’s product offerings, and interact with recruiters and engineers from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The mobile learning center will be in MSOE’s State Street C Lot, at the corner of Milwaukee and State Streets.

Demonstrations include:

  • Air to air energy recovery
  • Damper energy efficiency
  • Fan energy savings; reducing duct system effects
  • Energy saving ECM’s (Electronically Commutated Motors)
  • Saving energy with flow and pressure controls
  • Energy saving flow measurement

 

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is one of the best colleges and universities in the Midwest according to The Princeton Review. Only 158 institutions were named to the “Best in the Midwest” list on The Princeton Review’s website feature, “2015 Best Colleges: Region by Region.”

To compile their lists, The Princeton Review asks students attending the schools to rate their own schools on several issues -- from the accessibility of their professors to quality of their science lab facilities -- and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students, and their campus life.  Comments from surveyed students are quoted in the school profiles on The Princeton Review site.

The 158 colleges chosen for the “Best in the Midwest” list are located in twelve states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The Princeton Review also designated 225 colleges in the Northeast, 123 in the West, and 138 in the Southeast as best in their locales on the company’s “2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region” lists. Collectively, the 644 colleges named “regional best(s)” constitute about 25% of the nation’s 2,500 four-year colleges.

In addition to being named one of the “Best in the Midwest,” MSOE was one of only 24 colleges nationwide included in The Princeton Review’s “2015 Fire Safety Rating Honor Roll.” The honor roll honors colleges and universities concerning their on-campus housing fire safety practices and policies, and measures how prepared they are to prevent or respond to campus fires. MSOE was the only university in Wisconsin to be named to the Fire Safety Honor Roll.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Ten undergraduate students from around the country were selected to participate in Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), a prestigious 10-week summer program at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). Projects focused on a wide range of micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing applications at MSOE’s Centers for Excellence and meshed the fields of biology, chemistry, and medicine with mechanical, manufacturing, biomedical, electrical, computer and architectural engineering disciplines.

REU is an innovative, interdisciplinary program funded by the National Science Foundation, MSOE’s Rapid Prototyping Center, MSOE’s Fluid Power InstituteTM and the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP) to give undergraduates hands-on experience in research. This is the 18th year REU has been offered at MSOE, and 163 students have participated in the program.

Hands-on access to solid freeform fabrication devices and fluid power laboratories, close partnerships with advisors, industry mentors and other educational institutions, paired with a creative learning environment provided students with a high probability of success in research focused on solving industrial problems through advanced manufacturing technology.

Students conducted research, took field trips to visit professionals and problem solved with advisors, teammates and other resources. They participated in poster sessions, group discussions, research documentation, learned new software, made presentations, built models, designed and completed experiments and wrote research papers.

Participants

  • Jennifer Bateman, Mississippi State University, biomedical engineering major from Slidell, La.

Project: Manufacture of a Prototype for Functionality Studies of Cerebrospinal Fluid
Hydrocephalus is caused by abnormal fluid flow through the ventricles of the brain. This can be the result of an obstruction in the ventricles and an inability to reabsorb cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Ventricles in the brain swell as a result of accumulation of CSF. The aim of this research is to simulate the pulsation of CSF through the ventricles.  A model was created to include the brain and the CSF in the ventricles and subarachnoid space (SAS). The completed model will be tested under MRI. Advisor: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, mechanical engineering

  • Brittany Callan, Milwaukee School of Engineering, biomedical engineering major from Menomonee Falls, Wis.

Project: Creation of Additive Manufacturing Models of Intracranial Aneurysms
Intracranial aneurysm is a condition in which weakening of the blood vessel wall in the brain, along with the pressure of blood flow, results in a protrusion from the vessel wall that becomes filled with blood, often resulting in a rupture. This research focuses on creating patient-specific 3D models of the inner lumen of aneurysms with their connected significant vasculature using additive manufacturing. These models will be used for the education of patients to increase compliance for surgical procedures. Advisor: Dr. Jeff LaMack ’97, associate professor, biomedical engineering

  • Justin Clough, Milwaukee School of Engineering, mechanical engineering major from Burlington, Wis.

Project: Mold Sub-Microliter Test Tubes in Hydrogels for 3-D Micro-tissue Growth Using Additive Manufacturing
This research is focused on the creation of reusable molds made of DuraForm PA on a Selective Laser Sintering machine to create micron sized, test tube-like indentations in hydrogel. The sub-microliter test tubes in the hydrogels are designed to be used to culture 3D mammalian cells into micro tissues. Advisor: Dr. Vipin Paliwal, associate professor, physics and chemistry

  • Sophia Dolan, Columbia University, mechanical engineering major from Newton, Mass.

Project: Static Electricity Generation in Lubricant Filtration Systems
This study presents an investigation of electrostatic charge generation in return-line and tank-mounted hydraulic filters.  A variety of filter bowls, end caps, drop tubes and media were evaluated in a hydraulic circuit with a pure vegetable-oil based hydraulic fluid.  By comparing the relative flow rates, differential pressures, and filter element surface areas, the critical conditions for triboelectric charge generation were determined.  These finding are significant in the development of filtration systems that reduce this charge generation. Advisor: Paul Michael, research chemist, Fluid Power Institute

  • Kyle Joerres, St. Norbert College, physics and mathematics major from New Berlin, Wis.

Project: Characterization of Cold Atmospheric Plasma
Cold atmospheric plasma contains reactive species that vary depending on the source gas used. Emission spectra of the plasma at various locations of generation were analyzed with SciLDA spectroscopy software in order to characterize the presence of these reactive species. The parameter of gas flow was also modeled with the multi-physics simulator COMSOL with a 3D model of the apparatus to analyze the expected system behavior compared to physical observation. Advisor: Dr. Faisal Shaik, assistant professor, physics and chemistry

  • Kevin Lee, Milwaukee School of Engineering, mechanical engineering major from Hoffman Estates, Ill.

Project: The Modeling and Simulation of a Quadruped Robot
Legged robots are superior to wheeled and tracked robots in traversing unpredictable terrains. They are also capable of complex dynamic movements.   With the use of forward and inverse kinematics, simple movements and gait patterns were simulated using MATLAB and SolidWorks.  The animations were used to visualize and calculate movement workspaces of each leg.  Static and dynamic analysis of the robot were conducted to determine the forces and torques necessary to hold its weight and for walking. Advisor: Dr. Luis Rodriguez, assistant professor, mechanical engineering

  • Donald Kuettel, UW-Madison, mechanics and astronautics major from Hortonville, Wis.

Project: Gas-Power-Cycle and Pulley Optimization for a Walking-Engine-Actuated Active Ankle-Foot Orthosis
The main goal of this research is to help people with disabilities regain natural walking ability by replicating the normal walking gait of a human through the use of an active ankle-foot orthotic (AAFO).  A pressure-volume diagram of the AAFO’s internal-combustion (IC) engine was calculated using a dual-combustion (limited-pressure) gas-power-cycle model. Using the power output of the IC engine, the pulley system was optimized to best match the ankle moment of a healthy human gait. The results of this research will provide insight for the future development of un-tethered, compact, lightweight, efficient, long-lasting, and safe AAFO devices. Advisor: Doug Cook, research engineer, Rapid Prototyping Center

  • Jerusha Kumpati, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, biomedical engineering major from Marion, Ark.

Project: Three-Dimensional Cell Culture of Hepatocytes Using Gel Molds
The micro-structure of the liver is composed of hepatocytes that form small spherical micro-tissues, also called spheroids, and this structure is detrimental to the metabolic and detoxification functions of the liver.  This project proposes that under appropriate conditions hepatocytes self-assemble into 3D micro-tissues, where cells attach to each other and proliferate as a small mass under certain conditions.  To provide the conditions for the hepatocyte cell culture a hydrophilic sub-microliter reservoir was created to house the cells.  These reservoirs were molded with various hydrogels, such as agarose gels and polyacrylamide gels. Advisor: Dr. Vipin Paliwal, associate professor, physics and chemistry

  • Kalen Spinks, North Carolina A&T State University, mechanical engineering major from McLeansville, N.C.

Project: Material Characterization of Laser Beam Formed Ti-6AI-4V for Aircraft Applications
Ti-6Al-4V is a grade 5 titanium alloy commonly used in aerospace applications for its admirable properties.  In this study, the properties of laser beam formed Ti-6Al-4V were tested such as hardness and microstructure versus non-laser affected samples with varying laser power.  The conclusion of this study will help determine if laser beam forming is a viable manufacturing process in aircraft design. Advisor: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, mechanical engineering

  • Tess Torregrosa, Tufts University, chemical engineering major from Putnam Valley, N.Y.

Project: Fabrication of a Nursing Manikin Overlay for Simulation of Chest Drainage Management
The purpose of this research is to create an overlay for the SimMan® manikin to simulate a pneumothorax, pleural effusion or excess blood in the thorax for nurses to learn and practice responsibilities during chest drainage.  Beginning with a computer scan, a mold of the overlay was shaped using Geomagic Freeform. This mold was customized to accommodate all necessary components and ports of the simulator. The mold was printed in the Rapid Prototyping Center and injected with material to make the housing for the simulator. Advisor: Dr. Jeffrey LaMack ’97, associate professor, biomedical engineering

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

WMSEBBQ.jpgWMSE 91.7FM, MSOE's very own radio station, would like to thank its listeners for their ongoing support by hosting a good old-fashioned Backyard BBQ. The event will be Saturday, Sept. 6 from 4 to 10 p.m. and will feature music, food and fun for the whole family.

A stellar lineup of performers includes Los Straitjackets, Split Lip Rayfield, Indigenous and Mike Benign Compulsion. The fun will take place in the station's backyard at Cathedral Square Park at the corner of Jackson and Wells and coincides with MSOE's Welcome Week activities. All MSOE students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends are encouraged to attend this free public event.

"The Backyard BBQ has become a keystone in our efforts to give back to our sponsors and contributors for their ongoing support of WMSE" said Tom Crawford, WMSE station manager. "We would not be here without you and from the very bottom of our hearts we thank you."

Food and drink will be available for purchase from some of Milwaukee's best restaurants.

Milwaukee School of Engineering was named one of America’s Top Colleges by Forbes on its seventh annual list. MSOE has been included on the list every year since Forbes began ranking colleges and universities in 2008.

According to Forbes, “What sets our calculation of 650 colleges and universities apart from other rankings is our firm belief in ‘output’ over ‘input.’ We’re not all that interested in what gets a student into college. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting out of college.”

Postsecondary institutions in the U.S. were evaluated in five general categories: student satisfaction, post-graduate success, student debt, four-year graduation rate and academic success. Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in determining their list of the 650 schools that distinguish themselves from competitors by analyzing what students are getting out of their college education. There are more than 2,500 colleges and universities in the United States.

Read more about the Forbes ranking and view the complete list of America’s Top Colleges.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Schultz_Joshua.jpgDr. Joshua A. Schultz has been named Director of STEM at Milwaukee School of Engineering. Schultz’s primary roles are to provide leadership in the area of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to help increase student interest in STEM-related fields and to oversee MSOE’s pre-college programs, including Science Bowl, Summer Programs, Opportunity Conferences, FIRST Robotics, Engineering Discovery Days and others.

Schultz graduated from MSOE in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering and master’s degree in structural engineering. While working as a structural intern with Stutzki Engineering Inc., he continued his studies at Marquette University where he earned his Ph.D. in civil engineering in 2013. Schultz was a structural engineer for Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP in Chicago, and lecturer in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department at MSOE.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Thomas.Krumenacher.jpgThomas J. Krumenacher is the new president of the Milwaukee School of Engineering Alumni Association. He graduated from MSOE in 1990 with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology, and in 1998 with an M.S. in Engineering Management. He went on to graduate from Marquette University Law School. Today, Krumenacher is a partner in the Quarles & Brady LLP Milwaukee office and practices patent law.

Prior to being elected president, Krumenacher served on the association’s board of directors for eight years, most recently as the Wisconsin chapter director.

“It’s an honor to be elected as MSOE’s Alumni Association president,” Krumenacher said. “I enjoyed my time as a student at MSOE, as well as serving on the Alumni Association board of directors. I’m looking forward to being involved over the next two years with all of the alumni chapters as president.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Milwaukee School of Engineering offers the highest return on investment of all colleges and universities in Wisconsin, according to the 2014 PayScale College ROI Report, and is 63rd highest in the country!

In addition, the 2013-14 PayScale College Salary Report shows that MSOE alumni enjoy the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any college or university in Wisconsin.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries, and highest ROI of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

What began as a temporary exhibition at the Grohmann Museum has again turned into a permanent gift to the collection. Thomas H. Garver has donated nine of O. Winston Link’s photographic prints to the museum, five of which are signed by the photographer.link41.jpg

“On the heels of an extremely successful and well-received exhibition of O. Winston Link’s photography, Mr. Garver’s gift significantly increases the scope and quality of the Grohmann Museum’s photographic holdings,” said James Kieselburg, Grohmann Museum director.

Garver donated the photos to the museum following the exhibition Trains that Passed in the Night: Railroad Photographs of O. Winston Link (Grohmann Museum, 2014). The exhibition, organized by Garver and the Center for Railroad Photography and Art in Madison, featured 36 framed, original prints by Link, a Brooklyn, New York, native and commercial photographer who became well-recognized for his complex images of factory and industrial plant interiors. For Link, the steam railroad was a vital ingredient to “the good life’ in America, an essential part of the fabric of our lives. It is this quality—of life, not machinery—which he captures so artfully in his photographs.

Link’s photographs showcase the final years of steam railroading on the Norfolk & Western Railway, the last major railroad in America to operate exclusively with steam power. They are regarded as one of the best records of this long vanished type of locomotion, yet the broad appeal of Link’s photographs is derived not so much from the images of the steam locomotives themselves, but from the way in which their inclusion expresses the photographer’s deeply felt respect for the quality of life that the steam railroad reflected and supported for so many years in the United States.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Building on its tradition of delivering high-quality management programs, and preparing engineers and technical professionals for advancement to leadership, Milwaukee School of Engineering has launched several new master’s degree programs and added options for online courses.

Master of Business Administration

The MSOE MBA is built on an innovative course model that integrates traditional and new MBA content in a way that mirrors application. This allows the learner to apply the content of class-based case analysis in project-based field experiences during which leadership competencies are shaped and assessed. The program is available entirely online or through MSOE’s blended Internet format (alternate weeks of face-to-face class sessions and online delivery). Students can attend on a part-time or full-time basis.

MBA in STEM Leadership

Among the first of its kind in the world, the MSOE MBA in STEM Leadership prepares STEM teacher-leaders to develop and support initiatives to improve student learning outcomes in STEM fields. The degree blends STEM education techniques, business knowledge, and leadership skills to provide PK-12 teachers and college instructors with the capabilities needed to drive higher levels of student achievement in STEM fields. The program is available entirely online or through MSOE’s blended Internet format. Students attend on a part-time basis.

Online M.S. in Engineering and M.S. in Engineering Management

MSOE’s established MSE and MSEM degrees are now available entirely online. The interdisciplinary MSE program has a primary emphasis in the areas of electrical engineering and mechanical engineering. Students develop their engineering knowledge and skills in an effort to enhance the productivity of the practicing engineer. The MSEM program combines a student’s technical background with a core business curriculum, preparing them to rise to decision-making leadership positions. Both programs also are still available in traditional classroom format or through MSOE’s blended Internet format.

The addition of these new programs and the previously announced MBA in Education Leadership and M.S. in Nursing: Health Care Systems Management brings the total number of graduate degree programs at MSOE to 13.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE’s Winter Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

Download the Dean's List | Download the Honors List

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Water_Innovation_web.jpgTeam USA emerged victorious over Team Australia in the inaugural Water Innovation Challenge held during International Water Week in Singapore June 3-5. Involved with the team, which was organized by the American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE), were Douglas Nelson, P.E., assistant professor, and architectural engineering alumna Judith Torres ’12, G.E. (pictured, second from left). During three days of intense competition, the teams developed innovative solutions for emerging water and sanitation problems in Nepal and Bangladesh in a series of hands-on design challenges.

The multi-disciplined Team USA was comprised of students and professionals under the age of 26 and was led by William N. Erickson, an ASPE member and a vice president of ASPE’s Research Foundation. Torres, an associate member of ASPE who works as a graduate mechanical engineer for Progressive AE in Grand Rapids, Mich., was chosen as the engineer member of the team by the ASPE board of directors. Another ASPE member, Nelson, served as an advisor to the team.

“The clear understanding of the competition and the attention to detail of Doug Nelson and Judy Torres, both ASPE members, helped Team USA score consistently higher than the Australians in almost every category," said Erickson.

The other team members were Nicholas Michalenko, a licensed journeyman plumber with Rida Plumbing in Worthington, Mass.; Sarah Parker, an advertising and design student at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C.; and Tim Murphy, an apprentice plumber at Boulanger’s Plumbing & Heating in Easthampton, Mass.

“It was such an amazing experience, made even better when our efforts were rewarded with taking first place,” said Torres. “I am thankful ASPE gave this opportunity to a young professional and even more thankful I was chosen. It was an honor to represent ASPE, engineers, my company, and of course Team USA.”

The Water Innovation Challenge involved three main components. The first challenge, completed prior to the start of the competition, required the teams to design and document new water solutions to meet community problems in a village in northern Bangladesh. The second challenge, completed during the three days of competition, was to design and document solutions to community problems in Nepal. The final challenge involved hands-on practical tasks assigned each day, including assembling a hand bore pump, a rainwater collection system, and a solar pump installation. Using their assembled pumps, the teams raced against each other each day to be the first to fill a 100-liter water tank. The teams also were required to construct user-friendly installation and maintenance manuals that presented no language barriers. 

“It was an intense and stressful experience, but having so many tasks to complete gave us the energy to get through each day,” said Torres. Team USA and Team Australia were neck in neck at the end of the first day, but Team USA quickly learned from their mistakes and persevered on days two and three. “The members of Team USA complimented each other so well—as we gave our final presentations of our designs, it seemed like we had worked together for years,” she says. “I felt so proud to be part of such an amazing team, and I’m excited to see how our designs unfold when they are implemented in Bangladesh and Nepal.”

The 2014 Water Innovation Challenge was organized by the WorldSkills Foundation, Healthabitat, the World Plumbing Council, and the Institute of Technical Education in Singapore to raise awareness of sustainable systems that can be put in place globally to address issues such as water industry education and training, skills accreditation, installation, and maintenance. Team USA was sponsored financially by ASPE, the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO), Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA), Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC), and WorldSkills USA. Sloan Valve also made a generous donation.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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