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Wacky week of fun kicks off Friday, March 14 in honor of St. Patrick, patron saint of engineers

WHAT: Egg Drop Contest
WHEN: Friday, March 14, starting at noon
WHERE: Werwath Mall, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave. (between the MSOE Library and Science Building)

MORE INFO:
Students will engineer a way to protect a raw egg during a three-story drop using unconventional items (for example: flexible drinking straw, toilet paper, a toaster pastry, dental floss, a paper bag and plastic Easter grass).

The Egg Drop contest kicks off a week of wacky fun where business, nursing and engineering students at MSOE will celebrate the patron saint of engineers, St. Patrick. Forget the green beer … here are some highlights:

Engineering O’lympics
Thursday, March 19, 7 p.m.
Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway
Teams from many of MSOE’s student organizations will compete in mental and physical challenges that are a bit out of the ordinary.

Raider Rally and St. Patrick’s Proclamation Signing – will St. Pat cancel classes and rule MSOE?
Friday, March 21
Noon: Teams of students will parade from the MSOE Library (500 E. Kilbourn Ave.) to the Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway, third floor
12:15 p.m.:  Come and see if those Fir Darrig (faculty/staff) “snakes” try to prevent the proclamation from being signed by MSOE President Hermann Viets that allows Saint Patrick to rule the university. As rulers they burst into classrooms to cancel classes that afternoon. “Actors” in this decades-long MSOE tradition include St. Pat’s Court—dressed in colorful garb—faculty and staff, President Viets (who proclaims the day belongs to St. Pat) and innocent standers-by whose ties are unceremoniously cut off their necks!

MSOE’s Winter Quarter Dean’s and Honors Lists have been released. Undergraduate students who have earned at least 30 credits and have a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher (out of 4.0) are on the Dean’s List. Students who have maintained a 3.70 or higher receive “high honors.” Students on the Honors List have earned a term grade point average of at least 3.2 (out of 4.0) and are not on the Dean’s List.

Download the Dean’s List (pdf) | Download the Honors List (pdf)

Students: want to be a celebrity in your hometown? Make sure you fill out the hometown news release form so MSOE can send out positive news about you to your hometown newspaper.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

More than 70 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors and the Rader School of Business will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees at Milwaukee School of Engineering’s (MSOE) Winter Commencement, Saturday, March 1, at the Kern Center.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from MSOE Regent Scott Moon. Moon also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Business and Economics degree.

Scott Libert is the class respondent, the honor that goes to the graduate with the highest G.P.A. Libert is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. Kevin J. Matthews, who is graduating with honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, will receive the Alumni Association Award. Recipients of this prestigious award are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving.

About Scott Moon:

Born in Milwaukee, MSOE Regent Scott Moon graduated in 1974 from Carnegie-Mellon University with a bachelor’s degree in management science.  He received his MBA from the University of Chicago in 1976.

After working several summers in internship programs at Eastman Kodak in Rochester, N.Y., Moon joined Bee Chemical Company in Chicago as a market development specialist. In 1979, he joined Res Manufacturing as sales manager and became president in 1982.

For many years, Moon was a member of the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO) where he served as a director of the YPO Manufacturing Project, and as vice chairman of YPO Manufacturing Seminars. He chaired a YPO program for high school and college educators at New United Motors Manufacturing Incorporated (NUMMI), the joint venture between Toyota Motor Corporation and General Motors Corporation, and also the YPO Manufacturing Excellence Seminar at Motorola Inc. He worked with Motorola to put together a series of one-week seminars on quality improvement methodologies for YPOers and their key reports.

In 1999 Moon purchased DLSM Inc. becoming its CEO. DLSM is a holding company containing Res Manufacturing and Kondex Corp. Res Manufacturing is a diversified contract manufacturer of metal components supplied to the U.S. automotive and appliance industries. Kondex Corp. supplies cutting parts to the agriculture and turf care markets.

Moon has been a member of World Presidents Organization (WPO) and Chief Executives Organization (CEO), which are global organizations for education and idea exchange between leaders of businesses.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Kevin Morin was appointed vice president of operations in October 2013. Morin was previously the human resources director and now oversees the following departments on campus: Athletics, Environmental Health and Safety, Facilities, Food Service, Human Resources, Kern Center, MSOE Bookstore, Public Safety and Residence Life.

Also in October 2013, Dr. David Howell was appointed dean of students. He was previously a member of the faculty in the General Studies Department and held the Pieper Family Foundation Endowed Chair for Servant-Leadership. As dean of students, Howell oversees various areas pertaining to student life: Counseling Services, the Learning Resource Center, Mentor Program, Servant-Leadership, Student Activities, Student Government, TRIO Programs and Women’s Connections.

Rebecca Ploeckelman has been named director of human resources.

DeAnna Leitzke has been named to the Pieper Family Foundation Endowed Chair for Servant-Leadership.

Dr. Jane Page, associate professor, is the program director for the Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

VietsField.jpgThe Daily Reporter has chosen MSOE’s Pamela and Hermann Viets Field as one of the Top Projects of 2013. The award is given to the most challenging, innovative and awe-inspiring Wisconsin construction projects from 2013 that:

  • have a lasting effect on the community in which they were built
  • had serious challenges that were met by contractors on the job
  • used construction innovations
  • served their purpose with extraordinary efficiency and style
  • showed excellence in planning, engineering, design and construction management

Viets Field features an athletic field constructed on top of an in-ground, 780-car parking facility. The field is used for collegiate soccer, lacrosse, rugby and youth sports. As an extension of the Kern Center, it further supports MSOE’s commitment to student wellness and development as a whole person. There also is a small ground-level public park on the northern end of the site along Water Street. The $30 million project is the first major development of its kind in the Park East Corridor. The development was largely supported with a very generous donation from Drs. Robert and Patricia Kern.

There are several sustainable features in the new complex. Not only do the park and field provide needed green space for downtown, they reduce the heat island effect from hard surface building roofs and pavement. The three levels of parking under the field reduce local asphalt surface parking lots by 6.9 acres.

The athletic field is the first all-LED lit competition field in the United States, and the lights can be dimmed depending on the use of the field. The parking complex also features LED lighting, which decreases to 50 percent brightness when there is no activity. Dr. Alan Ruud, MSOE chairman of the board, donated all of the lighting for the field and parking complex. The LED lighting uses one-fourth the amount of energy that would be required by equivalent traditional metal halide fixtures. Taking all of these items into consideration, the facility could save up to 200,000 kilowatt hours annually as compared to a similar facility lit 24 hours a day/365 days per year with non-LED fixtures.

Uihlein-Wilson Architects were the project developers, and Hunzinger Construction Company was the general contractor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Kevin Morin was appointed vice president of operations at Milwaukee School of Engineering in October 2013. He was previously the human resources director and now oversees the following departments on campus: Athletics, Environmental Health and Safety, Facilities, Food Service, Human Resources, Kern Center, MSOE Bookstore, Public Safety and Residence Life.

Morin came to MSOE in 1978 as an admissions counselor after earning his bachelor’s degree from Marquette University. In 1980, Morin became the evening college coordinator/assistant registrar, where he worked until he moved into the Human Resources Department in 1982.

Morin, who served as the head wrestling coach for 20 years before he stepped down at the end of the 2013 season, guided his team to six team conference championships. He also had 28 wrestlers receive Academic All-American honors by the National Wrestling Coaches Association and ten teams were recognized for their academic excellence including four teams (2002-05) that had the highest GPA in the nation among NCAA Division III wrestling programs.  The team’s 100 percent graduation rate among active seniors on the team is one stat that Morin is most proud of. He received the Johanna Seelhorst Werwath Distinguished Staff Award in 1986. He completed the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification in 1990 and maintains this professional certification.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The NFPA Education and Technology Foundation awarded $97,000 to Milwaukee School of Engineering to establish a mechatronics/fluid power laboratory that will include modular hydraulic, pneumatic, electromechanical, and electrical components.

The lab will support a transformative curriculum that will develop mechanical engineering students’ technical skills throughout their four years of undergraduate study. Fluid power, mechatronics and computer technologies will be used to build student skills in modeling and simulation as well as in experimental techniques and instrumentation. Open-ended laboratory and design experiences in the junior and senior years will foster creativity and innovation and better prepare graduates to work in emerging fields of mobile hydraulics, industrial pneumatics, advanced manufacturing, medical applications, and sustainable energy technologies.

Dr. John Pakkala, associate professor, and Dr. Joseph Musto, professor, will lead the development of the laboratory, which will be in the Mechanical Engineering Department. Preliminary design work is currently underway and the lab is scheduled to be ready for student use by Fall 2015.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

DeAnna LeitzkeDeAnna Leitzke, PE has been named to the Pieper Family Foundation Endowed Chair for Servant-Leadership at MSOE. Leitzke is an assistant professor in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department.

Since 2006, Leitzke has facilitated dozens of service projects at MSOE which have given students the opportunity to practice the tenants of servant-leadership as they utilize the knowledge gained in their course work. Prior to joining the MSOE faculty, Leitzke worked as a mechanical design engineer and a consulting architectural engineer. She received both her Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering and Master of Science in Engineering Management from MSOE in 1998 and 2008, respectively.

Leitzke succeeds Dr. David Howell in this half-time position, which was made possible by a generous grant from the Richard Pieper Family Foundation in 2004. She will continue to teach in the CAECM Department, where she specializes in construction management.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

For the third straight year, MSOE has been named a Top Military-Friendly University by “Military Advanced Education” (MAE) in its 2014 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities. The guide provides potential students with information about institutions that go out of their way to give back to our men and women in uniform.

Among the attributes considered in evaluating institutions for inclusion in the Guide are the flexibility of learning options, extent of transfer credits accepted by degree level, on-campus ROTC, Servicemember Opportunity Colleges (SOC) participation, on-campus active duty/veteran assistance, the support provided to the families of servicemembers, faculty trained in veteran reintegration issues, presence on military installations, and  full-time counselors trained in veteran-specific mental health concerns, to name but a few.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

MSOE’s Mechanical Contractors Association of America student chapter is one of four finalists in the MCAA Student Chapter Competition. This is the fourth straight year they have qualified and this year will be defending their national title. Twenty-four universities from across the U.S. and Canada submitted entries. Teams had to submit proposals on a project involving the installation of the HVAC and plumbing systems in the Pilot Plant Expansion at the Sports Protein Inc. facility in Chicago. Bidders were also encouraged to propose design features that exceed LEED Platinum requirements and a post-construction service component.

MSOE’s team will travel to Scottsdale, Ariz., in March to present their proposals at MCAA’s national convention. They will compete against Sacramento State University, Southern Polytechnic State University, and University of Maryland – College Park.

Tyler Mrowiec (MCAA student president), Haily Fernald (MCAA student vice president), Evan Crayford, Ray Schwalbe, Jason Stauber and Sami Wallace will give a 15-minute presentation and answer questions in front of a panel of mechanical contractors and conference attendees. Several other students worked on the proposal and will attend the conference and competition as alternates: Sarabeth Haworth, Rachel Lynde and Gretchen Toshach. Dr. Blake Wentz, associate professor and construction management program director in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Construction Management Department, is the group’s advisor.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

grohmann_trains.jpgTrains That Passed in the Night: Railroad Photographs of O. Winston Link will be on display at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from Jan. 17 through April 27, 2014.

Organized by Thomas H. Garver and produced in collaboration with the Center for Railroad Photography and Art in Madison (www.railphoto-art.org), this exhibition features 36 framed, original prints signed by the photographer. O. Winston Link, a Brooklyn, New York, native and commercial photographer became well-recognized for his complex images of factory and industrial plant interiors. For Link, the steam railroad was a vital ingredient to “the good life’ in America, an essential part of the fabric of our lives. It is this quality—of life, not machinery—which he captures so artfully in his photographs.

Link’s photographs showcase the final years of steam railroading on the Norfolk & Western Railway, the last major railroad in America to operate exclusively with steam power. They are regarded as one of the best records of this long vanished type of locomotion, yet the broad appeal of Link’s photographs is derived not so much from the images of the steam locomotives themselves, but from the way in which their inclusion expresses the photographer’s deeply felt respect for the quality of life that the steam railroad reflected and supported for so many years in the United States.

A special Gallery Night and Day Event will be held to celebrate the opening of the exhibition. The museum will extend its hours on Friday, Jan. 17 from 5 to 9 p.m. and offer free admission. Garver, the curator of the exhibition, will give a presentation at 7 p.m.  The museum is also offering free admission on Saturday, Jan. 18 from noon to 6 p.m.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

WMSE 91.7FM will hold its 12th annual Rockabilly Chili Contest fundraiser at the MSOE Kern Center, 1245 N. Broadway, on Sunday, March 2 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 60 Milwaukee restaurants, cafes and caterers will compete against one another to determine the city’s best chili as voted on by event attendees.

Awards are given to winners in five different categories: best meat, best vegetarian, most unique chili, best heat, and best vendor display/presentation. The 2014 event features an expanded venue that includes the first floor gymnasium and the second floor field house, resulting in much greater seating and dining space.

New this year, the Milwaukee Fire Department will be participating (they’ll be judged separately by local celebrity judges). In addition, there will be chili pepper races, live music and a children’s area run by Artists Working in Education.

Advance tickets are $12, include 4 chili samples and can be purchased online or at WMSE, 820 N. Milwaukee St. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Children ages 10 and under are free. Additional chili sampling tickets can be purchased at the event for $1 each. Bring two or more non-perishable food items for the Hunger Task Force and receive two additional sample tickets. Tickets at the door (if available) will be $15.

Discounted tickets are available in advance to MSOE students ($5) and MSOE faculty and staff ($10) at the WMSE studios in Krueger Hall.

Thanks to the Kern Family Foundation, students, alumni, faculty and staff at Milwaukee School of Engineering enjoyed a special presentation by James Davison Hunter, author of “The Death of Character: Moral Education in an Age Without Good or Evil,” on Dec. 17.

In his book, Hunter traces the death of character to the disintegration of the moral and social conditions that make character possible in the first place. The dilemma he uncovers is especially acute in the realm of moral education, where society explicitly takes on the task of instilling enduring moral commitments and ideals within young people. The various strategies for accomplishing this task—psychological, communitarian and traditionalist—all operate, in the end, within a framework that renders the goal unachievable.

Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) held a Fluid Power Challenge on Dec. 9 at MSOE. Teams of eighth-grade students competed to solve a fluid power challenge by designing and constructing a mechanism that used fluid power technology. Twenty-four teams participated, making it the largest competition to date. Participating schools included: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, Milwaukee; Carter’s Christian Academy, Milwaukee; Fox River Middle School, Waterford, Wis.; Golda Meir School, Milwaukee; Humboldt Park School, Milwaukee; Lake Shore Middle School, Mequon; Lincoln Center of the Arts Middle School, Milwaukee; Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, Casco, Wis.; Mitchell Middle School, Racine, Wis.; Oak Creek West Middle School, Oak Creek, Wis.; Silverbrook Middle School, West Bend, Wis.; Starbuck Middle School, Racine, Wis.; and Steffen Middle School, Mequon, Wis

Congratulations to all who participated. The winners were:

Overall Champion: Mitchell Middle School, Team B, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Portfolio Champion: Starbuck Middle School, Team A, coached by Phillip Kiley
Design Champion: Luxemburg-Casco Middle School, coached by Joe Kempke
Team Work Champion: Carter’s Christian Academy, coached by John Wamser
Team Challenge Champion: Mitchell Middle School Team A, coached by Keith Kohlmann
Honorable Mention: Bruce Guadalupe Community School, coached by Adam Reynolds

IMG_3212.JPG.jpgAt a workshop in November, the students were given the assignment of designing and constructing a fluid power mechanism to perform a defined task. The mechanisms were required to use fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) to pick up weighted objects, and then place them on a platform for various point totals.

After working for four weeks, the teams came together again to compete against each other in a two-minute competition. Engineers from area companies served as judges, who graded the teams and presented awards in six categories-Overall Champion, Design Champion, Teamwork Champion, Portfolio Champion, Team Challenge Champion, and Honorable Mention.

The program is designed to introduce students, and their teachers, to the world of engineering and careers in fluid power. Through the Fluid Power Challenges, the NFPA hopes to encourage students to select more mathematics and science courses in their high school curricula to keep their options open for technology-based post-secondary studies.

MSOE School of Engineering and its Fluid Power InstituteTM would like to congratulate all of the students and teachers who were involved in the competition. To learn more about the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge, call (414) 778-3347.

NFPA provides a forum for the fluid power industry's channel partners-manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, customers and educators. Its 330+ U.S. and multinational members work cooperatively in advancing hydraulic and pneumatic technology through the association's many programs and initiatives.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; extremely high placement rates; and the highest starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Master’s program at Milwaukee School of Engineering will blend clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework and international experience

To close achievement gaps not only between America’s lowest and highest performing schools but between our top-performing schools and those around the world, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced today the creation of a new MBA school leadership program at Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). The new program for preparing principals will blend college coursework and a tailored business curriculum with intensive clinical experience in schools, corporations, and nonprofits, and involvement in innovative schools abroad.

The Woodrow Wilson (WW) MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership will recruit and prepare experienced educators, who will take 12 to 15 months of executive-style MBA courses. The program, one of the first in the nation, will be offered through MSOE’s Rader School of Business and will be equivalent in rigor to traditional MBA programs. It is designed to prepare leaders who will drive innovation in schools, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international standards, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time.

"Recent studies show that principals’ and superintendents’ jobs are increasing in challenge and complexity, and yet many programs around the nation that prepare school leaders still don’t fully address those challenges,” said Arthur Levine, president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and author of an influential national study that called for dramatically changing how the United States prepares school leaders. “We need a new way of thinking about how school leaders learn to address the issues they now face. This new MBA approach is intended not only to prepare strong leaders for Wisconsin, but also to provide a new national model. It will demonstrate how a high-value education MBA can replace the M.Ed. for principals and give Wisconsin school leaders the wherewithal to be more effective.”

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, candidates will be nominated by Wisconsin school districts, as well as choice and charter schools. Fellows selected will have demonstrated key characteristics of effective leaders and will be experienced with the culture of schools to be able to help transform them from within. They will receive a $50,000 stipend that includes tuition assistance for the master’s program, along with mentoring and opportunities for international experience in innovative schools in other countries. In exchange, Fellows will serve in leadership roles in identified schools for at least three years.

“MSOE offers a very pragmatic and hands-on education. Our students learn to identify and solve problems and create long-lasting solutions. We have a proven track record of graduating students who have career practice and are able to immediately apply what they’ve learned,” said Dr. Hermann Viets, MSOE president. “It is a natural fit for MSOE to be offering the MBA in Education Leadership and enabling school leaders to drive innovation. We are raising the bar in education standards and schools that have WW MBA graduates on staff will greatly benefit.”

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership program addresses twin problems in American education: On the one hand, well-resourced U.S. schools still rank below schools in countries like Finland and Singapore on measures of student achievement. On the other hand, too many of the nation’s high-need urban and rural schools still fall too far below domestic benchmarks for student achievement.

Two institutions—MSOE and the University of Indianapolis—are participating in the launch of the WW MBA in Education Leadership program. The MSOE program will focus entirely on eradicating the international achievement gap. According to McKinsey & Company, the United States’ economy loses as much as $2 trillion annually because its schools lag behind those in such countries as Finland and Singapore.

The national director of the program, LeAnn Buntrock, previously headed the acclaimed education leadership program at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. Based at the Foundation’s Princeton, N.J. office, Dr. Buntrock oversees the Indianapolis and Milwaukee programs as well as several expansion efforts currently under consideration. She has worked closely with Dr. Levine to shape and implement the program in accord with his previous findings.

“As schools face a wide array of changes, school leaders have to find new ways to engage strong teachers and help them drive student achievement. What makes the WW MBA Fellowship distinctive is that it really focuses on transformational leadership—different techniques for spotting and diagnosing issues, solving problems, motivating others to go beyond the status quo,” said Dr. Buntrock. “It’s also very unusual for leadership programs around the country to partner with school districts and education organizations to identify relevant projects that will give candidates actual in-school experiences, as this program will.”

MSOE will partner with 10 to 12 area school districts to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements—that is, in-school learning arrangements—and mentoring opportunities for the WW MBA Fellows. Fifteen Fellows will be selected for the program, with the first class announced in late spring 2014 and beginning the program in summer 2014. The candidates the program will produce, say local officials, are the kind of leaders their schools need.

The WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership draws on the Foundation’s experience with its state Teaching Fellowship, which recruits very able candidates to teach math and science in high-need schools, and also works to transform teacher education. The Teaching Fellowship is now operating in four states with 23 universities.

Applications to the WW MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership are available by nomination only. To learn more about the program at MSOE, visit www.msoe.edu/mbaeducationleadership. Go to http://woodrow.org/fellowships/ww-ed-mba to learn more about the Foundation’s work in leadership preparation.

The program is under review for approval by the Higher Learning Commission, with a final decision expected in summer 2014. It is also under review by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction with a decision expected by early 2014.

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation www.woodrow.org identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee School of Engineering (www.msoe.edu) is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,600 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.