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Originally published May 30, 2013

Several mechanical engineering students from MSOE and Lübeck University of Applied Science (Lübeck, Germany) excelled at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) District C Student Professional Development Conference at South Dakota State University. Students who attended the conference were: John Cote ’13 and Sean Larsen ’14 from MSOE, and Lübeck students Maike Ketelhut ’13, Hendrik Michaelsen ’13, Ronny Sperlich ’16 and Mukunda Tamang ’13. MSOE has a study abroad agreement with Lübeck. Dr. Mohammad Mahinfalah, MSOE mechanical engineering professor, was the students’ advisor.

Congratulations to those students who received awards at the conference:

  • John Cote ’13 took first place in the competition and also was the best technical winner in the ASME Old Guard Oral Presentation. He won a cash prize and will be paid for his travel to compete at the international level in San Diego in November.
  • All students who attended the conference participated in an impromptu design competition and took first place.

Congratulations also to Bradley Meissner ’13 and Richard Oliphant ’13, both of MSOE, who took first and second place, respectively, in an ASME poster contest that was held outside of the conference.

Like all professionals, engineers must possess a well-developed ability to synthesize issues and communicate effectively to diverse audiences. Among the highlights of ASME’s Student Professional Development Conference (SPDC) program is the Old Guard Oral Presentation Competition. This competition is designed to emphasize the value of an ability to deliver clear, concise and effective oral presentations, particularly pertaining to some sphere in which an engineer is or should be involved.

ASME is a not-for-profit membership organization that enables collaboration, knowledge sharing, career enrichment, and skills development across all engineering disciplines, toward a goal of helping the global engineering community develop solutions to benefit lives and livelihoods. Founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, ASME has grown through the decades to include more than 130,000 members in 158 countries. Thirty-thousand of these members are students.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 22, 2013

A team of 17 MSOE students designed, built and successfully flew an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for their senior design project this year.

The “Air Raiders’” hard work began in April 2012 when the 11 mechanical engineers, four computer engineers and two electrical engineers put their heads together to come up with a plan to compete in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aero Design Competition in Fort Worth, Texas. They began testing various engines for their aircraft and brainstorming ideas. In mid-September they received the competition guidelines and rules and their project began to take off. project this year.

In just 100 days, the team designed and built a work prototype aircraft according to competition specifications. Coincidentally, this is the same amount of time it took for the P51 Mustang to get into production during wartime, circa 1940.

The Air Raiders flew their prototype on January 19 with a hockey stick for the tail boom. The final version of the aircraft has a carbon tail, which is much thinner and lighter. In total, the plane weighs 8.5 pounds, has an 8-foot wingspan, is capable of carrying 15 pounds of cargo, and can drop an expellable 3 pound cargo at a target. The plane is equipped with GPS, a camera, altimeter and air speed indicator.

In March the team traveled to Fort Worth for the international competition, where they faced off against Virginia Tech, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, University of Western Ontario, Catolicha (Brazil), and others, including three teams from India. MSOE won the Second Place Overall Award in the Advanced Class, behind Missouri University of Science and Technology. The difference between first and second place was only 0.88 of a point! MSOE also took the Second Place Written Design Report Award and the Third Place Oral Presentation Award.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

The Air Raiders’ plane will be on display during MSOE’s annual Senior Project Day, Friday, May 24, from Noon to 3 p.m. in the Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway, along with more than 80 other senior projects and their student designers.

Originally published May 17, 2013

Seniors will be on hand to explain their Senior Projects, Designs and Proposals on Friday, May 24 at the Walter Schroeder Library, 500 E. Kilbourn Ave.; Werwath Mall, between the Library and Allen-Bradley Hall of Science; Student Life and Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway; and Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway.

Collaboration and teamwork are key components to an MSOE education, whether a student is an engineering major or pursuing a degree in the School of Business or School of Nursing.

Throughout the senior year, students work on a Senior Project. These are an opportunity for students to take everything they’ve learned in their time at MSOE and put it to use in a real-life application. Often, it’s a real-world project for a company or business that’s looking to solve a problem, while other projects are driven purely by a student’s interests and ideas from the classroom.

It all comes to fruition right before graduation at Senior Project Day—the culmination of all that they’ve learned and accomplished in this always interesting, sometimes frustrating and ultimately satisfying experience.

More than 80 senior projects will be on display. Here is a short list of examples:

SAE Aero Design:  The “Air Raiders” team designed an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that completed a full circuit of an airfield and dropped an expellable cargo successfully within 50 feet of a predetermined target. The team competed at the Society of Automotive Engineers Aero Design Competition in Ft. Worth, Texas, and took second place. Location: Todd Wehr Auditorium

Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment System:  This device will reliably track the progression of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy in patients in a simple and effective method. Peripheral Neuropathy is a slow progressing, nerve degenerating disease than an estimated 20 million American suffer from.  Location: Walter Schroeder Library

Early Response Cooling System:  The Early Response Cooling System allows medical personnel to begin immediate treatment for various injuries and conditions that require a patient’s core body temperature to be lowered, such as heat stroke or cardiac arrest.  Location: Walter Schroeder Library

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 20, 2013

Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Spring Commencement will be Saturday, May 25, at the Kern Center and  427 undergraduate and graduate students in engineering majors, the Rader School of Business and the School of Nursing will receive their bachelor’s or master’s degrees.

The ceremony will feature a keynote address from Dr. Vince Bertram, president and CEO of Project Lead The Way. Bertram also will receive an Honorary Doctor of Engineering degree.

Samantha Thorn is the class respondent. Thorn is graduating with high honors and will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management.

Eric Mealy, Kelly O’Callaghan and Jordan Wagner will receive the Alumni Association Award. The award is given to students who have made time in their hectic schedule to serve as a leader in university and community activities in addition to achieving academic excellence. Recipients are first nominated by faculty members in their respective academic departments and then the entire graduating class selects from among its peers the student who is most deserving of this prestigious award. Mealy is graduating with high honors and will receive a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. O’Callaghan is graduating with honors and will receive a B.S. in Software Engineering. Wagner is graduating with high honors and will receive a B.S. BioMolecular Engineering.

About Dr. Vince Bertram:
Bertram joined Project Lead The Way as president and CEO in June 2011. His passion for PLTW began in 2002 when he implemented the program as a high school principal. His commitment to PLTW continued as he supported implementations of Gateway To Technology, Pathway To Engineering, and Biomedical Sciences Programs.

Prior to joining PLTW, Bertram was superintendent of the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corp., and led Indiana’s third largest urban school district to unprecedented improvements in student achievement, community collaboration and operational efficiency.

Bertram chaired the National Council for National Honor Society (2006-07), served as director on several non-profit boards, and is a member of the Indiana Education Roundtable. Among his many honors, the Buffalo Trace Council of Boy Scouts of America named Bertram its “2011 Distinguished Citizen of the Year,” in 2010, Governor Mitch Daniels honored him with one of Indiana’s highest awards – naming him a “Distinguished Hoosier” – and in 2007, his Harvard peers and faculty members honored him with the Intellectual Contributions/Faculty Tribute Award recognizing his dedication to scholarship and his contributions to intellectual life at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Bertram earned doctorate, specialist, master’s, and bachelor’s degrees from Ball State University, a master’s in education policy and management from Harvard University, an executive certificate in strategy and innovation from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and is an alumnus of the Chicago Management Institute at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business.

About PLTW
Project Lead The Way (PLTW) is the leading provider of rigorous and innovative Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education curricular programs used in middle and high schools across the U.S.

PLTW’s comprehensive curriculum for engineering and biomedical sciences has been collaboratively designed by PLTW teachers, university educators, engineering and biomedical professionals and school administrators to promote critical thinking, creativity, innovation and real-world problem solving skills in students.

The hands-on, project-based engineering courses for high schools and middle schools and biomedical sciences courses for high schools engage students on multiple levels, expose them to areas of study that they typically do not pursue, and provide them with a foundation and proven path to college and career success.

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 14, 2013

Mechanical engineering students in MSOE’s University Scholars program created developmentally appropriate and innovative toys after learning about the cognitive, physical and socio-emotional development of children in their Toy Design class. The course was taught by Dr. Alicia Domack, a developmental psychologist, and Dr. Joseph Musto, a mechanical engineering professor. Children are invited to Discovery World on May 18 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is free and children are encouraged to test out the toy prototypes and ask questions.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 16, 2013

Born of Fire: Scenes of Industry brings together more than 20 paintings from the Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s collection of late 19th and early 20th century scenes of industry. The exhibit will be open at the Grohmann Museum, 1000 N. Broadway, from May 24 through Aug. 18.

Featured works capture the transformation of the American landscape from an agrarian society to an industrial one, interpreted in the work of both Pennsylvania and national artists celebrating industry as their subject. The Westmoreland is the largest repository of southwestern Pennsylvania art in the country and they share this exhibition with the hope of developing a new appreciation not just for the art of Pennsylvania, but other regions as well.

An opening reception will be held Friday, May 24 from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be a film presentation at 7 p.m. of Born of Fire: How Pittsburgh Built a Nation. The film explores the cultural exchanges that took place during the Big Steel Era through art, music, oral histories and social commentary.

The Grohmann Museum is home to the Man at Work collection, which comprises more than 900 paintings and sculptures dating from 1580 to the present. They reflect a variety of artistic styles and subjects that document the evolution of organized work: from farming and mining to trades such as glassblowing and seaweed gathering. The Grohmann Museum welcomes visitors to three floors of galleries where a core collection is displayed as well as themed exhibitions. The museum is owned by MSOE, an independent university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in the engineering, business, mathematics and nursing fields.

Originally published May 13, 2013

Congratulations to the more than 60 Milwaukee School of Engineering students who were nominated for leadership awards this year. The following awards were presented at the annual President’s Student Leadership Awards Dinner on May 8:

Outstanding Student Award

Jordan Wagner, of Cedarburg, Wis., was chosen as the 2013 recipient of the Fred F. Loock Outstanding Student Award. This award is presented annually to the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) senior student, who, in the opinion of the faculty, most notably combines an excellent academic record and has at the same time demonstrated leadership and professional bearing in extracurricular or community service activities. It is the most prestigious student testimonial that MSOE bestows. Wagner will graduate on May 25 with a bachelor’s degree in biomolecular engineering from MSOE.

Other Awards

Vincent R. Canino Outstanding Biomedical Engineering Senior Student Award – Benjamin Bowe, Chippewa Falls, Wis., biomedical engineering
Nursing Leadership Award – Megan Syversen, Pewaukee, Wis., nursing
Matt W. Fuchs Outstanding AE&BC Senior Student Award – Andrew Hillstrom, Milwaukee, Wis., architectural engineering and construction management
Thomas W. Davis Student Leadership Award – Aaron Becker, Milwaukee, Wis., industrial engineering
Daniel E. Sahs Award for Service – Samantha Herold, Orland Park, Ill., biomedical engineering
Outstanding Peer Assistant Award – Anna Gutman, Menomonie, Wis., industrial engineering
Resident Assistant Programming Award – Benjamin Coopland, Kenosha, Wis., mechanical engineering
Greek of the Year Award – Jasmine Strickler, Pleasant Hill, Iowa, business management
Student Employee of the Year Award – Bryan Baumann, Muskego, Wis., management information systems
Senior Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Jordan Werner, Bolingbrook, Ill., soccer/track, electrical engineering
Senior Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Emma Lumpe, Lawrence, Kan., soccer, architectural engineering
Scholar Men’s Athlete of the Year Award – Nathan Brunk, Lake Mills, Wis., hockey, business management
Scholar Women’s Athlete of the Year Award – Kate Herrmann, Sycamore, Ill., soccer/track, biomedical engineering

Faculty/Staff Awards

    Several faculty and staff members also were recognized this year:
Oscar Werwath Distinguished Teacher Award – Dr. Russell Meier, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department
Johanna Seelhorst Werwath Distinguished Staff Award – Dana Grennier, Enrollment Management Department
Student Advocate Award – Valerie Manuel, Public Safety Department
Greek Advocate of the Year – Eric Homann, Facilities Department

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 8, 2013

Students and parents often wonder if all of the hard work and tuition dollars of a college education will pay off in the end. It does if you graduate from MSOE.

Recent data from PayScale.com highlights which colleges and universities in the United States offer the best return on investment (ROI). On the 2013 College Education ROI Rankings, MSOE has the 7th best ROI in the Midwest and is 59th best in the country! PayScale.com data also shows that MSOE alumni enjoy the highest average starting salaries and mid-career salaries of any college or university in Wisconsin.

Why does it make sense to attend MSOE?

  • 94% placement rate for the 2011-12 graduates
  • Average starting salary for the class of 2011-12 was $55,368
  • Average class size: 22
  • Student-to-faculty ratio: 14:1
  • Professors have an average of seven years industry experience
  • No teaching assistants
  • Students get an average 600 hours experience in industry-standard laboratories
  • Four-year graduation guarantee
  • Graduate Tuition Grant to cover the cost of a graduate degree at MSOE
  • 19th Best University in the Midwest, 14th Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs, and 11th Best Mechanical Engineering Program in 2013 according to U.S.News & World Report
  • One of America’s Top Colleges according to Forbes.com
  • Named one of the Best in the Midwest Colleges by The Princeton Review

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 6, 2013

The Ruehlow Nursing Complex at MSOE is now open. The complex is a $3 million, 25,000 square-foot innovative and experiential learning center for the MSOE School of Nursing. MSOE Regent Kathleen Ruehlow, an MSOE alumna of the Milwaukee County General Hospital School of Nursing, is the major supporter of the project. MCGHSN merged into MSOE in 1995.

The Ruehlow Nursing Complex, featuring new classrooms, laboratories and faculty offices, is located on the first floor of the Student Life and Campus Center. The new space is nearly quadruple the size f the existing nursing labs, and allows the faculty to enhance the already innovative education experience that is the hallmark of an MSOE education. Nursing students actively engage in simulation-based learning opportunities in authentic representations of actual healthcare situations. They integrate theoretical learning into practice through experiential learning opportunities that allow for repetition, feedback, evaluation and reflection.

Features:

Simulation Rooms
Simulation experiences are a critical part of nursing education. Simulations provide students with opportunities to communicate with patients, respond to patient needs, and witness the consequences of their decision-making and clinical reasoning in a hospital-like setting. The Ruehlow Nursing Complex features four simulated hospital rooms that are connected by a central nurses station, similar to a hospital intensive care unit. The rooms feature call lights for the patients, who are high fidelity manikins. The life-like manikins are driven by computer software that enables them to breathe, cough, talk or change conditions based on what nursing professors have programmed.

A unique feature of the Ruehlow Nursing Complex is the direct linkage of two classrooms with two simulation rooms. Students learn theoretical concepts in class and can immediately turn to the back of the classroom where the opened wall allows them to apply what they have just learned to the care of a patient in the simulated hospital. In addition, each of these rooms contains biomedical technology and other equipment necessary to care for patients with diverse needs.

The four simulation rooms and their patients are:

  • CC-131 Sim Junior Manikin: Students learn to provide nursing care for a pediatric patient in an acute care environment. This patient might have acute or chronic health conditions.
  • CC-132 Laboring Mom Manikin: Students learn to provide nursing care for a woman with maternal health needs. This mother may be in labor or delivering her baby.
  • CC-133 Simman Classic Manikin: Students learn to provide nursing care for adults with acute and chronic conditions.
  • CC-134 Simman Essential: This patient has an acute illness, and also can be transported into the classroom for the purposes of teaching and learning.

General Labs
Four state-of-the-art laboratories where students learn health assessment skills and about active integration of pharmacology with medication administration. These skills prepare sophomores for their first clinical experience with real patients.

Home Care Lab
The home care lab is set up like a handicap accessible studio apartment. It includes a kitchen area, table and chairs, living room furniture, a large screen TV, washer, dryer, and spacious bathroom with shower. Students take turns playing the role of the patient and teaching one another how to maneuver within the home with an illness. Students also learn how to use adaptive devices such as wheelchairs, walkers and assistive devices within the home, and receive a simulation of what their patients experience.

Student Area
Nestled in the middle of the Ruehlow Nursing Complex, the student area offers the opportunity to engage in collaborative learning as well as an environment in which to socialize and relax.  In addition to comfortable furniture, there is a Mondopad, which is a touch screen TV that allows for student computer use as a display screen for group work. The student area also has a refrigerator, microwave and cabinets for storage of materials by the nursing student organizations.

MSOE School of Nursing
The MSOE School of Nursing offers both a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and an Accelerated Second Degree B.S. in Nursing. The programs educate graduates to address the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to health states. The extensive integration of technology into compassionate nursing practice enables graduates to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to provide safe, effective, high-quality client-centered care as members of a complex, continually evolving health care system.

Why do students choose the B.S. in Nursing at MSOE?

  • Students are admitted directly into the nursing program
  • The first nursing course is in the freshman year and clinical experiences start in sophomore year.
  • MSOE has a four-year graduation guarantee.
  • Varied and unique clinical sites help students discover what type of nurse they want to be.
  • Focused attention from dedicated faculty in small classes.
  • Graduates had an average starting salary of $52,763 and 100% placement rate (2011-2012).
  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accreditation.

Regent Kathleen Ruehlow
MSOE Regent Kathleen Ruehlow ’72 is a graduate of the Milwaukee County Hospital School of Nursing, which merged into MSOE in 1995. Kathy is the widow of MSOE alumnus Gerald Ruehlow ’69 who died in August 2004. Jerry was vice president of technology of Generac Power Systems and also a Distinguished Alumnus. Regent Ruehlow is president of the Ruehlow Family Foundation. She is a strong supporter of MSOE students through a multiple-student scholarship program established in the Ruehlow family name, and also through her major support of the new nursing complex.

About MSOE
MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 2, 2013

MSOE’s student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers took second place overall in the ASCE Great Lakes Regional Conference. As a group, the students took first place with their technical paper and first place in the geotechnical competition.

The Concrete Canoe Team finished in third place. The Steel Bridge Team took second place, which qualified them for the ASCE/AISC National Student Steel Bridge Competition for the third year in a row. They will travel to the University of Washington May 31-June 1, 2013, where they’ll compete against teams from across the United States. Dr. Frank Mahuta is the ASCE faculty advisor.

Members of the Concrete Canoe Team include:

  • Karissa Brunette, architectural engineering
  • Liz Crawford, construction management
  • Neree Croteau, architectural engineering
  • Garrett Ducat, architectural engineering
  • Pat DuBois, electrical engineering
  • Michael Herriges, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Brian Janus, civil engineering
  • Kasaundra Mooney, architectural engineering and construction management
  • Elise Pinkerton, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Jeff Scarpelli, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Jessica Schaefer, construction management
  • Johanna Wang, architectural engineering
  • Lindsey White ’12, structural engineering

The Steel Bridge Team is comprised of:

  • Mike Anaszewicz, civil engineering
  • Matt Braden, architectural engineering
  • David Burt, civil engineering
  • Pat Flaherty, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Alex Flunker, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Jeff Freund, mechanical engineering
  • Blake Gleason, construction management, construction and business management
  • Jeff Henriksen, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Michael Herriges, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Ryan Kaput, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Brett Kash, architectural engineering, construction management
  • Dustin Kuderer, architectural engineering
  • Anthony Leonardelli, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Matt Schultz, architectural engineering, structural engineering
  • Brandon Shea, architectural engineering
  • Barbora Srnova, civil engineering
  • Gretchen Toshach, architectural engineering
  • Luke Vetroczky, architectural engineering
  • Julie Windish, architectural engineering, structural engineering

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published May 1, 2013

MADISON, WIS. — MSOE Rowing’s Michael Dorus will attend the elite USRowing Mendota Developmental Camp, June 20-Aug. 1, this summer in Madison, Wis.

Dorus (Jr./Des Plaines, Ill./SE) is the first rower in the six-year history of the MSOE Rowing program to qualify for such a camp, which serves to select and prepare teams for the national U23 Trials and the Elite Nationals, as well as to represent the nation at the prestigious Royal Canadian Henley Regetta. Qualification was contingent upon Dorus’ 2000-meter output time on a calibrated indoor rowing machine, or ergometer, being less than six minutes and 25 seconds, along with other physical factors.

USRowing is recognized by the United States Olympic Committee as the governing body for the sport in the United States. The non-profit organization selects, trains and manages the teams that represent the nation in international compeition, inlcuding the Olympic Games.

“If Mike wants to make the Olympics,” MSOE Rowing coach Chuck Stollenwerk said, “I believe he will. He is very smart, versatile and a tremendous with problem-solving and strategy. I think whatever Mike puts his mind to, he will accomplish.”

The camp continues a meteoric rise through the ranks for the indomitable Dorus, who began rowing at MSOE two years ago without any previous experience and has undergone a physical transformation to reach his current level.

Dorus first came to MSOE after serving in the United States Air Force from 2004-08. After marrying his then-fiancée, Melissa, in 2010, Dorus was an alternate for MSOE’s top novice and varsity openweight boats as a freshman and sophomore, years the program showed great depth. A turning point in Dorus’ career came last year, when he and former Raider Dave Taylor formed a two-man coxless team that was one of six to reach the Bob Negaard Cup Final out of 25 competitors at the Aberdeen “Dad” Vail Regatta on the Schuylkill River near Philadelphia.

It was during the summer of 2012, though, when Dorus took his biggest steps towards becoming an international-level competitor, dropping 30 pounds to become eligible to row for MSOE’s lightweight teams.

“He had to have put millions of meters on the rowing machine that summer,” Stollenwerk said. “He made healthy changes to his diet, too. Mike has an incredible work ethic.”

With Dorus’ oar on the port side, MSOE Rowing posted a number of signature victories this year. On Sept. 15, 2012, the Raiders’ eight-man boat defeated all four entries from Purdue and took second in the Milwaukee River Challenge with Dorus in the 2 seat. A month and a half later, the Raiders’ Lightweight 4+ team finished sixth out of 16 at the Head of the Charles Regatta in Cambridge, Mass., surviving a four-boat collision to improve its standing by two places from the year before. Sitting bow, Dorus helped MSOE defeat a number of boats from world-renowed rowing schools and clubs, including Harvard, Penn, Georgetown, Fordham, the United States Naval Academy and the Argonaut and Ottawa Rowing Clubs of Canada.

Acceptance into the camp comes as a result of Dorus’ hard work both on and off the water. “The University of Wisconsin is the dominant rowing program in this region,” Stollenwerk said, “and there aren’t many rowers from the Midwest who can even think of competing at that camp who aren’t Badgers. He had to reach out to [USRowing and Wisconsin coach] Beau Hoopman for the opportunity.”

The camp is being hosted by University of Wisconsin Rowing.

“For Mike to reach this level shows how fiercely competitive he is and how badly he wants to prove himself. To make the U.S. National Team in rowing, or any sport, is no picnic. Making the Olympics would be even harder.  But Mike’s desire won’t be what gets in the way.”

Stollenwerk also expects the MSOE program to benefit from Dorus’ attendance. “As more guys see what Mike is doing and go to camps themselves, I can only see our teams getting faster.”

Camp information

Originally published April 29, 2013

All are invited to hear Dr. Owe Petersen, professor and assistant vice president of institutional research and assessment, deliver his “Last Lecture” on Thursday, May 2 at 6 p.m. in the Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway. He will give the fourth annual lecture in MSOE’s Last Lecture series, in which one member of the MSOE staff or faculty is invited to pass on their greatest and most succinct knowledge and life-experiences to the MSOE community. Petersen, who taught at MSOE for 20 years, will reflect on his time at MSOE and also share his life experiences and accomplishments.

The purpose of the series is twofold: to recognize a faculty or staff member for his or her years of service and contributions to the university, and for those in attendance to learn what the speaker truly believes are the most important facets of their human life experiences and accomplishments. Students, faculty and staff have the opportunity to nominate speakers from a list of eligible individuals, and the speaker is chosen by the Student Life Office.

Petersen served as chairman of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department for eight years, and prior to that was the electrical engineering program director for six years. Petersen also oversaw the electrical engineering exchange program between MSOE and Lübeck University of Applied Sciences in Germany.

Petersen was born in Stolp, Germany (now the city of Swupsk, Poland), in September 1941, during the World War II. Upon the death of his father in 1944 his family returned to his parents’ home town of Husum, Germany. Eventually they moved to Flensburg, Germany, a city on the border with Denmark. Because of his ethnic background he attended the Danish school system for five years. During summers he lived on a farm in Viborg, Denmark.

In 1953 Petersen, his mother and brother immigrated to the U.S., initially settling in northern Illinois before moving to Milwaukee. After numerous moves and schools he graduated from Rufus King High School. He attended UW-Milwaukee for two years, transferred to UW-Madison and graduated in 1963 with a B.S. in electrical engineering, although his primary interest was in physics and mathematics. He started to work in a grocery store at the age of 11, and continued that “career” for many years through high school and early college.

Petersen received a master’s and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, in 1965 and 1971, respectively. In 1963 he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in Reading, Penn., as a member of technical staff and pursued a research and development career lasting for 30 years. His work spanned technical topics such as the design of microwave and millimeter silicon devices, integrated circuit design and technology, molecular beam epitaxy, optical data links and transatlantic repeaters, reliability and metallurgy.

He was an AT&T visiting professor at North Carolina A&T State University from 1990-92. In 1993 he accepted a faculty position at MSOE as associate professor in the EECS Department. He has coauthored more than 60 presentations and papers. In 2005 he was awarded the Ehrennaddle (honorary award) by the Lübeck University of Applied Sciences for meritorious service to the university and the field of engineering education.

Petersen is a senior member of the IEEE and longtime ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission evaluator in electrical engineering. He served on many church committees at the congregation and regional level in the Lutheran Church and twice was as a delegate to the national convention. Petersen and his wife Lorna are the parents of three children and grandparents of seven.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 29, 2013

Students from Alverno College, Gateway Technical College, Milwaukee School of Engineering, UW-Milwaukee, and UW-Whitewater were winners in the BizStarts Collegiate Business Plan Competition held April 24 at MSOE. The competition was sponsored by Mason Wells and the Milwaukee Institute.

First Place and $5,000 were awarded to Digifii. Digifii provides 3D scanning hardware and software for the booming 3D printing industry. The student team from UW-Milwaukee included Jesse DePinto, Matthew Halenka and Kamal Hussain. Their advisor is Kanti Prasad.

Second Place and a $4,000 prize went to Ferret Boards. This company makes kits to add electric motorization to existing skateboards. Matthew Brazeau, Michael Cosentino and Jacob P. Schneider were on the team from MSOE. Dr. Jeffrey Blessing is their advisor.

HazFutbol.com took Third Place and won $3,000. HazFutbol.com is a social network for amateur soccer. The student team from UW-Whitewater included Franco Zurita and Hernando Zuritz. Their advisor is William Dougan.

Fourth Place and $2,000 were awarded to Life Works, an online tarot card reading, email and advice service. Colleen Alex, Sue DaBaco, Renee Tuinstra and Bethany Zebell comprised this student team from Alverno College. Daniel Matre is their advisor.

Bowl Appetit won Fifth Place and $1,000. Bowl Appetit is a new fast casual restaurant in Brookfield, Wis. and features a “Build Your Own” menu. Connie Howen, of Gateway Technical College, presented this business plan and Sara Skowronski is her advisor.

The BizStarts Mason Wells Collegiate Business Plan Competition originated in 2009 by members of the BizStarts Milwaukee College Consortium, a collaboration of post-secondary institutions in the Milwaukee 7 Region. The contest helps student entrepreneurs realize their goals while helping the M7 region grow and prosper economically. It is a “contest of winners” as entrants in this contest are selected by their institutions as their best plans for each academic year.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 26, 2013

All are invited to the MSOE Theatre Troupe’s production of Francis Swann’s Out of the Frying Pan, a New York tale of a group of six aspiring stage actors, living together in an apartment directly above famous Broadway producer Arthur Kenny. The group, desperate for work, wants to showcase their dramatic talents for him, but it soon goes horribly wrong, and the police are soon shuffled into the mix!

Shows will take place Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m. and at 7 p.m., and on Sunday, April 28 at 2 p.m. in the Todd Wehr Auditorium, 1047 N. Broadway. Tickets are free for current MSOE students, alumni, and alumni family, and $5 for the general public.

MSOE’s Theatre Troupe is one of more than 70 student organizations at MSOE. These organizations provide students many social, intellectual and professional rewards that complement their academic endeavors.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,500 students. MSOE offers 20 bachelor’s degrees and nine master’s degrees in engineering, business, mathematics and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 94% placement rate; and the highest average starting and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Originally published April 23, 2013

AURORA, ILL. — The MSOE Men’s Golf team is the champion of the Northern Athletic Conference and will represent the league in the NCAA Division III Men’s Golf Championship after riding a tournament-best team score of 303 in the final round of the 2013 NAC Tournament to victory yesterday at Stonebridge Country Club in Aurora, Ill.

Scott Loftus (Jr./Germantown, Wis./BE) led the way for the Raiders, winning the individual conference title by recording a 1-under-par 71 final round to finish the event with a 10-over-par 298. The 71 equalled the NAC Championship single-round record and was seven strokes better than Marian College’s Cory Ashbeck and his 17-over-par 305. Miguel Diaz-Garcia (Fr./Gijon, Spain/EE) and Jacob Phelps (Fr./Loves Park, Ill./EE) were part of a three-way tie for seventh place with a 29-over-par 317.

“You could see Loftus’ confidence improve more and more as the tournament went on,” head coach Joe Meloy said. “He started hitting his mid-range irons really well and the putts started falling, too.”

As part of the weekend’s events, Loftus was also named the NAC’s Roger Fleming Player of the Year and earned a spot on the all-conference team alongside Phelps and Diaz-Garcia. Meloy was named NAC Coach of the Year, while Victor Aiello (Jr./Kenosha, Wis./ME) earned the conference’s Sportsmanship Award.

“Aiello deserves more credit than he’s going to get,” Meloy said. “He pushes the guys to get out there and really work at their game. His effort made a bigger difference than what shows up on the scorecard.”

The uniquely formatted tournament actually began on Oct. 15, 2012 when 10 teams began the first of a planned two fall rounds in Haven, Wis. at the Whistling Straits Irish Course, with two more scheduled for Stonebridge in the spring. MSOE trailed Edgewood College by one stroke, 313-312, after the first round, but the second round was postponed to the spring and Aurora by inclement weather on the final day of the fall event, then was again pushed back from its rescheduled April 20 date by more weather issues.

Once things got back underway Sunday, the Raiders charged to the lead with a second-round score of 315, 10 strokes better than Edgewood and seven strokes better than any other school remaining. Loftus’ 2-over-par 74 was two strokes better than any other competitor in cold and windy conditions.

In the first of the final two rounds of the tournament yesterday, Edgewood pushed to come back, using a 74 from Patrick Bohrer to a 16-over-par 304 team score to pull within just one stroke of the Raiders. But Loftus’ 71 was three strokes better than Bohrer’s second 74 of the day in the fourth round and marked the difference between the two teams as MSOE’s net, 91-over-par total of 1,243 ended up besting Edgewood’s 94-over-par 1,246.

The conference title is the Raiders’ third as a member of the NAC and the 13th under Meloy, whose teams dominated the Lake Michigan Conference before MSOE’s move to the NAC in 2006. The victory marks just the third time, however, the Raiders have qualified for the NCAA Championship, which will be held May 14-17 at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Destin, Fla. The Raiders’ first trip to the national championship came in 2009, when MSOE finished just one stroke away from qualifying for the 23-team final. MSOE last appeared in the tournament in 2011.

“You go for the experience,” Meloy said. “I don’t necessarily have any expectations. I just want my guys to understand how special it is to compete on that kind of stage. I’m very excited for them.”