MSOE Newsroom

MSOE Global Brigades make a difference

May 2nd, 2016

2016_news_gb_water2Students traded sun and sand for social change during spring break when the MSOE chapter of Global Brigades sent two groups of volunteers to Central America on service trips. The Medical Brigade traveled to Nicaragua where they worked primarily in a clinic setting providing basic medical care to the community while the Water Brigade traveled to Honduras to build a water system.

Global Brigades is an international non-profit student-led organization that empowers under-resourced communities to meet their health and economic goals aided by university volunteers and local teams. During trips that span one to three weeks in partner counties, students work collaboratively with community members to achieve medical, water and infrastructure needs. When one group of students leaves, another takes its place. Brigades include: Business, Dental, Engineering Environmental, Human Rights, Medical, Microfinance, Public Health and Water.

These service trips are mutually beneficial, offering the participating communities much needed support, while students gain valuable practical skills in their areas of study. Global Brigades delivers integrated health and economic programs to meet a community’s development goals. For more information visit globalbrigades.org.

MSOE Medical Brigade

The MSOE Medical Brigade took 41 student-volunteers to Jinotega, where they split their time between among the communities of Datanil, Hermita and El Salto. In Datanil, volunteers set up a free clinic. “We were able to work in a triage station, which included taking patients’ vitals and getting them ready to see the doctor,” said Medical Brigade President Heather Hansen, a nursing major. Students shadowed local and foreign health professionals – such as dentists and doctors – who were provided pro-bono consultations and medications.

Volunteers also assisted in medication packing and health education. “We worked with the children and taught them proper health hygiene – the importance of brushing their teeth, washing their hands, etc.”

Over the course of the three days, 653 patients accessed the complimentary health care services.

Volunteers then worked in Hermita de Sarawak, where they took on Public Health Brigade tasks, building home health infrastructure. “We helped build latrines, which are their form of a bathroom,” Hansen said. “This consists of a shower, toilet and washing station for clothes.”

The group was able to build eight latrines, as well as pour three concrete floors – two in homes and one in a church.

The final leg of the journey was spent in El Salto, where student helped out in a Water Brigade capacity – picking rocks from a mountainside to be used for a retaining wall.

“The trip really gave people a wide experience of what Global Brigades is about,” Hansen said. “Global Brigades isn’t just about helping in the medical field, it’s about helping those communities in need become sustainable. This is one of the things I love most about the organization: they don’t just go in once and leave, they track data at the clinics, and they look at what the community is missing and help them form businesses to meet those needs. It all starts from meeting the most basic needs, then they work their way up.”

MSOE Water/Engineering Brigades

2016_news_gb_water1A group of MSOE students from the Water Brigades traveled to the Los Hautales, communities on the volcanic island of Amapala in southern Honduras. The goal of the trip was to help area residents plan and install water systems.

For three days, the MSOE group of 21 volunteers worked side-by-side with Honduran men and women digging trench, laying pipe, and backfilling in 100 degree heat. For two days, the volunteers visited communities with existing water systems that were in need of improvement. Students also led an education workshop that focused on watershed protection, which was attended by 50 local children.

This was the first year MSOE had a Water Brigade. It replaces the Architecture Brigade, which was discontinued by the Global Brigade program.

“Students from different majors across MSOE were able to combine their skills to make this trip a huge success,” said Water Brigade President Kelsey Murzyn, civil engineering major.

Beginning in the fall of 2016, MSOE will add a Public Health Brigade to its overarching Global Brigade offerings.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , | Comments Off on MSOE Global Brigades make a difference

Mechanical engineering seniors win at ASME competitions

April 29th, 2016

2016_news_asme_teamApril 29, 2016 — MSOE’s American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Student Design team took second place at the 2016 Student Design Competition held at Minnesota State University, Mankato, April 22-24, 2016. With this win they will be progressing on to compete at the ASME national competition.

Mechanical engineering seniors Clark Anderson, Sven Kirschtowski, Bilal Nyazi, Devin Runner, Arthur Siebel, Ou Yang and electrical engineering major Pascal Dettmann, designed and built a small machine that processes and launches three projectiles, each made of a standard A4 size piece of paper. The goal is to achieve the farthest distance and complete the task in less than five minutes. The team’s machine accomplished this by rolling up the paper inside a steel tube, crushing it into a dense cylinder using a ball screw that applied over 1,000 pounds of force, and throwing it using a slingshot style mechanism. Professor Mohammad Mahinfalah, Ph.D. is the team’s advisor. The project also served as the team’s senior design project, and will be on display May 27 during MSOE’s annual senior project day on campus.

The ASME Student Design Competition provides a platform for ASME Student Members to present their solutions to a range of design problems – from everyday household tasks to groundbreaking space exploration. Each team is required to design, construct and operate a prototype meeting the requirements of an annually determined problem statement.

The Student Design Competition showcases the extraordinary talents of mechanical engineering students while encouraging them to develop innovative ideas towards an improved quality of life for all. Each year, several teams compete at the regional Student Professional Development Conferences in select locations worldwide. Winners then proceed to finals at the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE). Cash prizes and awards are presented to winners at both regional competitions and the finals.

Justin Clough and Megan Kroll, both mechanical engineering seniors, participated in the ASME Old Guard Oral Presentation Competition. They each delivered a 15-minute presentation on a subject addressing a technical, economic or environmental aspect of engineering. A major portion of the total score is based on the judges’ evaluation of the student’s relative capability to communicate orally, including evidence of a talent to respond effectively during a five-minute question and answer period. Clough was awarded second place and the award for “Best Technical Content.” Kroll received fifth place.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , , , | Comments Off on Mechanical engineering seniors win at ASME competitions

Students with big ideas reap big rewards at Festival

April 29th, 2016

2016_news_festival_1st

Abigail Johnson – first place

April 29, 2016 — MSOE students across program areas shared their creativity in the first annual Festival of Big Ideas organized by the General Studies Department. Eleven students participated in the event, which took place April 22 in the Grohmann Museum.

Students were invited to present any topic that promotes intellectual curiosity or provides meaningful entertainment. Entries included musical presentations, a comedy routine, a short film, and formal presentations.

The top three entries received monetary awards, presented by Yazmene Thomas. Abigail Johnson received first place and a $500 award for her presentation “Every Student Should be an Artist”; Matheus Faria Inacio, received second place and $300 for his piano solo entitled, “Impressions of the Human Learning Process”; and the third place prize of $200 went to Logan Readnour for her presentation, “Volunteering: What’s in it for You?”

A team of General Studies faculty – Dr. Nadya Shalamova and Dr. Tammy Rice-Bailey, associate professors, Department Chair Alicia Domack, Ph.D., and Dr. Katie Wikoff, professor – developed the event. Acting as event emcee was lecturer Yazmene Thomas.

2016_news_festival_2nd

Matheus Faria Inacio – second place

“The Festival of Big Ideas was the brain-child of Dr. Nadya Shalamova, who wanted to allow MSOE students to showcase their creativity and ideas,” said Rice-Bailey. “Next year, we are hoping to expand the event.”

Entries were evaluated on their “big-ness” (How buzz-worthy and transformative is the idea?), design (How original and creative was the design of the presentation?) and the execution (Was the delivery engaging or entertaining? Was the delivery seamless and well-prepared?) Faculty judging the event included Wikoff, Dr. William Gonwa and Dr. Leah Newman. About 70 people attended the new event.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

2016_news_festival_3rd

Logan Readnour – third place

Posted in , | Comments Off on Students with big ideas reap big rewards at Festival

MSOE offers best value among Wisconsin colleges

April 26th, 2016

April 26, 2016 — MSOE tops the list of the 2016 Best Value Colleges in Wisconsin according to results from a recently released SmartAsset survey.

The survey looked at five factors to determine Wisconsin’s best value colleges and universities: tuition, student living costs, scholarship and grant offerings, retention rate and starting salary. Both private and public colleges were included in the survey.

MSOE graduates have the highest average starting salary in the state at $61,500, with a tuition of $34,740, offset by scholarships and grants averaging just over $20,000. These combined factors put MSOE in the number one spot for best value proposition. Coming in second and third on the list are the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. Read more in the Milwaukee Business Journal.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders

Posted in , , | Comments Off on MSOE offers best value among Wisconsin colleges

MSOE students recognized for bridge building project in Guatemala

April 22nd, 2016

2016_news_EWB1April 22, 2016 — Residents of the Guatemalan village of Chumisa will now have reliable, year-round access to education, health care, and economic development – thanks to a bridge-building project led by MSOE students.

Under the mentorship of Milwaukee-area Professional Engineers – and in cooperation with Guatemalan community partners– the MSOE chapter of Engineers Without Borders designed and built a 42-foot span reinforced concrete vehicular bridge that connects Chumisa to the nearby municipality of Joyabaj. Without this bridge the route was impa
ssible during the six-month rainy season. The bridge design meets all the relevant US and Guatemalan standards.

The Chumisa bridge was designated a Premier Project at the EWB-USA International Summit in March, an honor reserved for projects that deliver high quality, sustainable solutions to help meet the basic needs of partnering communities abroad. EWB-USA’s chapters are working on projects in 45 countries on five continents.

Students raised their own money for travel and were aided by a grant from the O2016_news_EWB3ffice of Servant-Leadership. The cost of the project itself is shared among the participating groups: The municipality provided cement and other materials and equipment worth over $15,000, the community of Chumisa provided wood and labor worth over $17,000, and EWB-MSOE’s donors provided approximately $28,000 to complete the funding. “Like all of our projects, this was conceived, planned, and implemented with local partners,” said Dr. Doug Stahl, co-advisor of the EWB-MSOE group.

Construction began in February, when an MSOE team worked with the community to excavate for the footings, construct the footings, and construct the abutment walls. The EWB-Wisconsin Professional Partners travel team then worked with the community to construct wooden formwork and concrete beams. Finally, a second MSOE team arrived about three weeks later to lead the community during construction of the deck and railing, as well as the wing walls. Professional mentors provided guidance for the students, reviewing drawings and calculations regularly during the design phase that started in June 2015.

The community of Chumisa provided manpower on a daily basis. “There is great focus on partnership and the vital importance on working with community members, side by side in construction and communication during design to ensure their needs are met,” said Project Manager Riley Padron, senior civil engineering major. “We do not simply work to give them a bridge and then leave; we work to provide them with means and opportunity to build the bridge with us and take full ownership after we leave.”

2016_news_EWB2When students traveled to Chumisa over spring break, village residents were ready to work. “There were a couple of days when we had more than 60 people show up to help,” said senior Logan Bertling, civil engineering major. “[We] had to start coming up with more tasks to keep everyone busy and involved – which is a wonderful problem to have and helped us get ahead of schedule.”

The experience was a great opportunity for students to apply the theory they learned in class. “I was able to use everything I had learned up to that point to perform the structural calculations for the superstructure of the bridge. I gained a ton of valuable construction experience and learned a lot about carpentry since I was a part of the formwork crew.”

The Chumisa Bridge, which is expected to open end of May, is MSOE’s seventh project in Joyabaj since 2008.

In June 2015, EWB-MSOE designed and constructed the El Salitre pedestrian bridge that spanned 230 feet across the Rio Arco. The trip for the El Salitre project lasted two weeks. Padron has had the opportunity to participate in multiple projects and trips with EWB-MSOE. “These trips provide a new perspective on the impact of engineering projects. Our partnership with these communities has allowed us to help improve their lives and their communities as a whole. That experience stays with you and helps motivate students to perform to the best of their abilities.”

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , | Comments Off on MSOE students recognized for bridge building project in Guatemala

Student organizations host Bone Marrow Donor Registry Drive, April 22

April 20th, 2016

April 20, 2016 — When MSOE nursing student Amberley Kowalski was diagnosed with cancer and learned she needed a donor for her stem cell transplant – the odds that one of her siblings would be a match were one in four. “They told me not to worry though, that I would find a match in the Donor Registry,” Kowalski said.

Kowalski was beyond surprised when all but one of her seven younger siblings was a match and she would have her pick of the donors. She ultimately selected her 6 foot tall, 22-year-old brother who was in perfect health. In four hours they collected enough cells for five transplants.

“I was unlucky in a lot of ways, but this time I got lucky,” Kowalski said.

MSOE students have the opportunity to be someone else’s good luck on Friday, April 22, when students can join the national bone marrow donor registry. The Student Nurses Association, Women’s Softball Team and Lambda Zeta Nu are sponsoring the Be The Match drive, which will take place from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Campus Center.

2016_news_BeTheMatch_ZachOperated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), Be The Match has managed the largest and most diverse marrow registry in the world for 25 years. Thousands of patients with blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, sickle cell anemia or other life-threatening diseases depend on the Be The Match Registry to find an unrelated bone marrow donor to save their lives. One of these donors is MSOE biomedical engineering major Zachary Polak. Polak signed up during last year’s Marrow Registry Drive.

“My girlfriend Shannon had asked me to sign up,” he said. “I figured why not seeing as how the best case scenario I could try and help to save a life…and that’s exactly what happened. Not even 2 months later I was a match for a 13-year-old girl with leukemia.” Polak donated his bone marrow on Aug. 5, 2015.

“The entire experience was life-changing for me and I would do it all over again if needed,” he said. “To be able to give this girl a chance to have a life is the best thing I can possibly think of to do for someone and if I was asked to donate bone marrow again I would do it in a heartbeat.”

For more information about the bone marrow registry, visit bethematch.org.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , | Comments Off on Student organizations host Bone Marrow Donor Registry Drive, April 22

Nursing student brings personal experience to program

April 20th, 2016

2016_news_Kowalski_MSOEApril 20, 2016 — Life is too short to postpone your dreams – it’s a reality that Amberley Kowalski knows too well. The option to get on the fast-track to a health care career was what drew the 31-year-old Hebron, Illinois native to MSOE’s accelerated nursing program.

“I like MSOE’s program because it allows me to get moving forward,” Kowalski said.

The Accelerated Second Degree B.S. in Nursing is a compressed, year round curriculum designed to enable students to enter the workforce as professional nurses in about 18 months.

The degree program was designed specifically for the adult working professional who has already earned a bachelor of science or bachelor of arts degree in another discipline and is looking to change careers.

Kowalski’s circumstance wasn’t exactly so cut and dry. “I had what was basically an unexpected ‘break’ in my life,” she said.

The “break” Kowalski refers to occurred when she was in her mid-20s and pursuing a bachelor’s degree in English. She was planning to become a teacher. Then in 2010, about halfway through her program at Northern Illinois University, Kowalski was diagnosed with a fast-growing cancer – specifically, a primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBC).

Teaching English took a backseat to Kowalski’s new area of study: cancer.

2016_news_Kowalski_cancer“I really wanted to educate myself about what was going on so I read and researched everything I could,” she said. “My mom would come to appointments with me and she would joke that it sounded like two doctors talking and she didn’t understand what was being said.”

Kowalski spent two years in personal health limbo, riding the emotional highs and lows of the treatment rollerco
aster. “The scariest time was when the cancer came back in my liver after the first stem cell transplant using my own cells failed,” Kowalski said. “That was the worst possible outcome.”

Running out of local options, Kowalski’s research led her to the National Institute of Health in Maryland, where she was taken on by the foremost PMLBC researcher in the world. There, with her younger brother as a donor, she underwent a stem cell transplant. “When I could start to see the light at the end of the tunnel – that maybe I am going to get through this – I starting really thinking about what I am going to do with my life,” Kowalski said.

2016_news_Kowalski_brotherHer experience at the National Institute of Health as part of clinical research trial, as well as the time she spent with doctors and oncology nurses, put her on her current path. “When I was there, I met a nurse who was the same age as me,” Kowalski said. “She had had leukemia in high school. There is something about being cared for by people who have actually been there. They understand. I have something from my experiences that you can’t learn and I want to help other people who are going through it.”

Kowalski finished her bachelor’s degree at NIU in 2013, and, after completing her pre-requisites, in 2015 she entered the Accelerated Second Degree Nursing program at MSOE.

“These types of personal experiences and background are what nursing is all about – it is what draws people to the profession and what keeps you going day in day out,” said Dr. Jane Paige, program director of the Accelerated Second Degree Nursing program. “The ability to empathize and care for others who are being challenged with health issues, life and death, life style changes, and so on is not easy to fully understand unless you have gone though it yourself.”

Kowalski, an aspiring oncology nurse, currently volunteers with a variety of cancer related organizations, including: Be The Match, Athletes 4 Cancer, Relay for Life and Andrea Lynn Cancer Fund.

“It changed me,” Kowalski said. “My life is so much different now. If there is something I don’t want to do, I don’t do it. I concentrate on the things in life that make me happy.”

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , , , | Comments Off on Nursing student brings personal experience to program

NASA Robotics Mining Team works with Big Brothers Big Sisters

April 15th, 2016

2016_news_NASA_Robotics_MiningApril 14, 2016 – MSOE’s NASA Robotics Mining Team hosted an outreach event in March with children from Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Milwaukee. The team of MSOE students participating in the NASA Robotic Mining Competition are required to host a community outreach event per competition rules. The group of students had already met this requirement in December by inviting girls from the Notre Dame Middle School of Milwaukee but the wanted to reach more children who are interested in the STEM fields. The goal of this event was to introduce and increase younger students’ interest in engineering by having them build rockets. All of the participating children, ages 8-12, come from a single parent household which are not commonly found to have a future career in a STEM field.

At the beginning of the event, students sat in on presentations that described what engineers do, information about the NASA competition, and were presented some engineering concepts to incorporate into their designs. Concepts of air drag and the forces exerted on rockets were introduced as well as the different parts that make up a rocket.

The requirements for the project required students to design and build the rockets out of everyday materials while being judged on aesthetics, cost and the distance traveled. Students were given a budget to purchase supplies which taught them how to handle budget constraints. The MSOE students acted as consultants to the children, making it entirely up to the children to use their knowledge to create their rockets. Materials used involved PVC pipe, paper, index cards, cardboard and different kinds of tape. Students used markers to personalize their rockets and to gain points in the aesthetics category. At the end of the event the students were excited about taking their rockets and new knowledge home with them.

Students commented on how fun the event was and that they gained decision-making skills and learned how to manage time and money. MSOE students enjoyed seeing how focused and determined the children were during the event. MSOE’s NASA Mining Competition Team hopes to keep hosting events like this to increase young students’ interests about science, robotics and engineering.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 96% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

Posted in , , , | Comments Off on NASA Robotics Mining Team works with Big Brothers Big Sisters

Help students make memories

April 14th, 2016

April 14, 2016 — In the March edition of Alumni E-news, we asked our alumni who had the greatest impact on their time at MSOE. There was no clear “winner”—it’s obvious that each of these individuals played a key role in helping our alumni have an exceptional experience on campus. Some of the comments we received:

“I actually worked for Betty, Cheryl and Rick at various points during my time at MSOE and they were all wonderful. It was the dedication of people like these honorees that made it much easier for us to obtain these degrees, because quite frankly at times, it was kind of difficult! People like Betty, Cheryl and Rick made MSOE not just a college but a home, and I am very grateful for that.”

“Gary was tireless in helping us to prepare the final draft of our thesis papers as graduate students. Couldn’t have done it without him.”

“Willie was always a helpful and understanding face in the public safety desk.”

“As a member of the Amateur Radio Club, I remember fondly when Rich helped us replace the transmitting antenna on the Campus Center. Too many other great memories for me to list.”

“Mary is a big part of the reason I am where I am and why I continue to give back.”

2016_news_enews_staffNow those who’ve helped students through their career want your help to make MSOE a great place for our current and future students. Will you donate today to support:

  • Facility and technology improvements for the Raider Center for Academic Success
  • Furniture purchase for the MSOE “Tree Lounge” to enhance the student experience
  • And/or technology equipment purchases for the MLH & RWJ residence halls

Make an impact on students – make an investment in MSOE!

Posted in , | Comments Off on Help students make memories

MSOE and Prevent Blindness Wisconsin host symposium

April 12th, 2016

The MSOE School of Nursing is teaming up with Prevent Blindness Wisconsin to host the first-ever Vision Screening and Eye Health symposium tonight at MSOE in the Campus Center, 1025 N. Broadway, room CC-244. The symposium, which will kick off Tuesday, April 12 at 5:30 p.m., will include a panel presentation featuring MSOE Assistant Professor of Nursing Rhonda Powell.

Prevent Blindness Wisconsin is a not-for-profit volunteer organization that offers free, certified vision screenings, which identify children and adults who need full eye exams. PBW partners with universities like MSOE, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Cardinal Stritch to implement vision screenings and eye health clinicals into nursing program coursework. Nursing students in turn help provide the screenings.

“It’s a win-win for both organizations,” Powell said. “For our students it’s an opportunity to develop their skills through health training, connect with clients in the community, and earn clinical hours. The community clients receive free vision screenings and are being helped to identify vision problems and get vouchers for exams and eye glasses.”

MSOE nursing students screen between 1,000-1,500 children in grades kindergarten through high school annually. In one screening of 300 students, 30 were referred for eye exams and within six weeks, 12 were examined and prescribed eyes glasses.

“Studies show that one-quarter of all school-age children have some type of vision problems and their education is affected,” Powell said. “The earlier it’s detected the sooner it can be treated.”

Powell hopes the symposium will increase awareness about the program.

“I think we have had a major impact on Milwaukee already,” Powell said. “But if more community partners come forward, we can affect an even larger portion of the population.”

The symposium is expected to last 90 minutes. Parking is available in the Broadway parking lot. Street parking is also available.

Posted in | Comments Off on MSOE and Prevent Blindness Wisconsin host symposium

« Older Entries
Director of Media Relations
JoEllen Burdue
Director of Media Relations
Phone: (414) 277-7117
Office: APC
Connect with MSOE
Link to my Facebook Page
Link to my Linkedin Page
Link to my Twitter Page
Link to my Youtube Page