MSOE Newsroom

Student-built rocket wins award

August 18th, 2017

Aug. 18, 2017 – A team of MSOE students placed 10th overall in the Midwest High Power Rocketry Competition and received the additional honor of “Coolest Looking Design.”

The Raider Rocketeers

The Raider Rocketeers

The Raider Rocketeers was one of three teams chosen by the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium to participate in the national competition. Students were challenged to design and construct an “adaptable” single stage, dual deploy high-power rocket system that will fly to the same highest possible altitude on two distinctly different motors. The rocket had to be recovered safely and in flyable condition.

In addition to building the rocket, students were tasked with predicting the rocket’s flight performance with each selected motor and constructing a non-commercial on-board data collection package for the rocket that would directly measure velocity versus time, for comparison with data collected by a commercial rocketry altimeter, as well as sense and log airframe separation and parachute extraction from the airframe for both drogue and main parachute deployments, and also collect up and down video from outside the airframe to certify expected (i.e. primary, not backup) drogue and main parachute full deployment.

“The overall objective of the competition is to promote engineering design skill development for aerospace applications that encompasses STEM areas,” said Dr. Anand Vyas, team advisor and adjunct assistant professor of mechanical engineering. “The competition objectives tacitly embed research as part of exploring design options and learning from published papers, articles, and codes related to high power rocketry.”
IMG_6955The competition typically has a final launch date during the second weekend of May. This year, due to inclement weather, the launch was rescheduled. MSOE’s Raider Rocketeers launched on July 8.

“We are grateful to Frank Nobile from Tripoli Rocketry Association for serving as safety advisor to the Raider Rocketeers and facilitating the rescheduled launch on July 8,” Vyas said. “Without his help, rescheduled launch would not have been possible.”

MSOE has been participating in the Midwest High Power Rocketry Competition since 2012-13. The competition was run by the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium (MnSGC) but open to college/university student teams from across the nation, during the 2016-2017 academic year.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Money, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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The Princeton Review names MSOE among the Best in the Midwest

August 15th, 2017

MSOE StudentsAug. 15, 2017 — Milwaukee School of Engineering is one of the best colleges and universities in the Midwest according to The Princeton Review. Only 158 institutions were named to the “Best in the Midwest” list on The Princeton Review’s website feature, “2018 Best Colleges: Region by Region.” MSOE has been included on this list every year since 2003.

The Princeton Review asks students attending the schools to rate their own schools on several issues — from the accessibility of their professors to quality of their science lab facilities — and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students, and their campus life.  Comments from surveyed students are quoted in the school profiles on The Princeton Review site.

MSOE is consistently ranked highly by a number of organizations, as seen online at msoe.edu/rankings.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Money, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling receives $1.35 million NIH award

August 9th, 2017

A physical model of the CRISPR/Cas9 protein used in genome editing experiments.

A physical model of the CRISPR/Cas9 protein used in genome editing experiments.

Aug. 9, 2017 — The MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM) has received a $1.35 million Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This five-year grant will support the creation of a professional development program for high school science teachers entitled, The Science and Ethics of Genome Editing. The CBM will recruit three cohorts of 24 high school teachers from across the United States to participate in a two-year series of workshops.

The SEPA Program provides funding for innovative pre-kindergarten to grade 12 science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and Informal Science Education (ISE) educational projects that create partnerships between biomedical/clinical researchers and teachers and schools, among others.

The goal of the CBM’s new program is to train teachers to go beyond the basic concepts of classical genetics (visible results from reproductive acts) and show students how the field has evolved into today’s era of molecular genetics (studying the structure and function of genes at a molecular level). CRISPR, the latest technological development in this field, has made it possible to edit the human genome.

In the first year of the program, teachers will attend a week-long summer course at MSOE to explore the technologies that allowed for the development of molecular genetics. In the second year, they will attend a workshop hosted by the CBM on the campus of either the University of California-Berkeley or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where major CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing research groups are at work. The teachers will have an opportunity to visit CRISPR research labs and meet with the scientists who are developing and applying this technology.

This NIH grant is the fourth in a series of SEPA awards to the CBM, an instructional materials development laboratory that specializes in the use of 3D printing technologies to create accurate physical models of proteins and other molecular structures. These models are one component of the innovative teaching tools created by the CBM for use in the professional development programs supported by NIH SEPA grants. Since 2001 more than 400 high school science teachers have trained with CBM staff to use these materials with their students.

Tim Herman, Ph.D., founder and director of the CBM, is principal investigator for the latest SEPA grant. Co-investigators include CBM program director Margaret Franzen, Ph.D.; former CBM program director Gina Vogt, M.S.; and CBM program director Diane Munzenmaier, Ph.D.  Other key personnel in this project include Dina Newman, Ph.D. and Kate Wright, Ph.D. (Rochester Institute of Technology), who will document the impact of the program on teachers and their students; and noted bioethicist Alta Charo, J.D. (University of Wisconsin).

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Money, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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Forbes names MSOE one of “America’s Top Colleges” for 10th year straight

August 3rd, 2017

MSOE CC Campus CenterAug. 3, 2017 – MSOE is one of America’s Top Colleges according to Forbes. This is the 10th straight year MSOE has received this designation. Forbes began ranking colleges and universities in 2008 and MSOE has been included on the list every year.

According to Forbes, “Before you become a college student, you need to think like a graduate. Our goal is to showcase the colleges and universities that deliver the best return on your education investment dollars.”

Forbes evaluated U.S. colleges and universities in five general categories: post-graduate success, student debt, student experience, four-year graduation rate and academic success. There are more than 2,500 colleges and universities in the United States, and only 650 were designated a Top College by Forbes.

Read more about the Forbes ranking and view the complete list of America’s Top Colleges.

In addition to naming MSOE as one of America’s Top Colleges, Forbes gave MSOE an “B” on their annual list of financial grades for private, non-profit colleges and universities today. This grade helps students determine if their college is financially fit. Read more…

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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Undergraduates to present top-notch research from REU program

August 1st, 2017

Aug. 1, 2017 – Nine undergraduate students from across the United States will present their work from the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at MSOE on Wednesday, Aug. 2 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the fourth floor of the Grohmann Tower, 233 E. Juneau Ave.

Since 1996, the REU program at MSOE has focused on a wide range of micro-manufacturing applications in the aerospace, architectural, biomedical, biomolecular, composite, electro-optical, fluid power, manufacturing and robotics industries. The prestigious 10-week summer program offers undergraduate students from around the country access to MSOE’s expert faculty and state-of-the-art research facilities.

REU is an innovative, interdisciplinary program funded by the National Science Foundation, MSOE’s Rapid Prototyping Center and the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP) to give undergraduates hands-on experience in research. Since 1996, 199 students have participated in the program. For the third year in a row, two participants spent six weeks conducting research in advanced manufacturing at the National Laser Center at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa.

Hands-on access to solid freeform fabrication devices and fluid power laboratories, close partnerships with advisors, industry mentors and other educational institutions, paired with a creative learning environment provided students with a high probability of success in research focused on solving industrial problems through advanced manufacturing technology.

Students conducted research, visited professionals and problem solved with advisors, teammates and other resources. They participated in poster sessions, group discussions, research documentation, learned new software, made presentations, built models, designed and completed experiments and wrote research papers.

Characterization of Pluronic F-127/Pectin Hydrogel for Potential Tissue Engineering Applications

Elizabeth Bryant, civil engineering major at LeTourneau University in Longview, Texas, from Columbia, Mississippi

Advances in biofabrication are closing the gap between the number of people waiting for a transplant and those receiving one. This research focused on the use of a novel pectin-based bioink. Pluronic® F-127 is used in the bioink to create a hydrogel during the initial bioprinting process. In order for the pectin/Pluronic solution to maintain its structure, a crosslinker is employed for the gelation of pectin. The crosslinkers tested were oligochitosan, Ca2+ and Zn2+. The structural integrity of the bioprinted scaffold was used to determine the crosslinkers effectiveness. Moreover, post-printing treatment of the scaffold using chitosan was investigated to increase the biocompatibility of ionic-crosslinked gels.
Advisor: Dr. Wujie Zhang, assistant professor, biomolecular engineering, MSOE

Characterization of Functionally graded Ti-6Al-4V + Mo for Biomedical Applications

Andrew Gray, mechanical engineering major at MSOE, from Mundelein, Illinois
Kevin Sivak, mechanical engineering major at MSOE, from Orland Park, Illinois

This research assessed the material characteristics of several functionally graded Ti6Al4V samples with varying percentages of molybdenum. Laser Metal Deposition was employed to produce several samples with varying percentages of molybdenum at two laser speeds of 1500 W and 1700 W. One sample was created with 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 10%, 5% and 0% Mo on Ti64 substrate while the other with 15%, 10%, 5%, 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% Mo. Hardness, microstructure, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to check the powder morphology and the X-Ray Diffractogram was used to check the phases present in the samples. The usefulness of functionally graded Ti6Al4V-Mo alloy for biomedical applications was established.
Advisors: Dr. Subha Kumpaty, professor, mechanical engineering, MSOE; Dr. Esther Akinlabi, University of Johannesburg; Dr. Sisa Pityana, University of Johannesburg

Characterization and Modification of Pectin-Based Nanofibers

Marquis Henderson, mechanical engineering major at North Carolina A&T University in Greensboro, North Carolina, from Waldorf, Maryland

Pectin is a polysaccharide that can be found in the skin and cell walls of different fruits — and is biodegradable, biocompatible and easily accessible. Ca-pectin and Oligochitosan-pectin nanofibers previously were successfully prepared. Characterization of the nanofibers’ surface charge through zeta potential (the measurement of the potential difference of a surface of a solid object immersed into a conductive liquid) was conducted to establish the influence of crosslinkers, Ca2+ and oligochitosan. It is deemed favorable for the surface charge of the nanofibers to be positive in order to promote cell attachment, survival and proliferation. Various methods of fabricating the nanofibers into specific shapes were also investigated. This research shows promise for biological applications.
Advisor: Dr. Wujie Zhang, assistant professor, biomolecular engineering, MSOE

Experimental Characterization and Control of Pneumatic Cylinders for Robotic Applications

Winnie Ngo, mechanical engineering major at City College of New York, from New York, New York

In an effort to understand the dynamics of pneumatic cylinders utilized in robotic applications, a custom pneumatic testbed was developed. This testbed uses pressure regulators to control the pressure inside the chambers of a double acting cylinder and sensors to measure the pressure and flow of air into each of the chambers. The device will serve to improve the mathematical model and to help with the development of control strategies to more precisely manipulate the position and forces generated by the cylinder. An Arduino microcontroller was used to record the sensor signals and to control the pressure inside each cylinder chamber. Based on the experimental data a more realistic mathematical model was developed and steps were taken to control the position and force of the cylinder.
Advisor: Dr. Luis Rodriguez, assistant professor, mechanical engineering, MSOE

Creation of an Apparatus to Investigate the Flow Characteristics through Artificial Heart Valve

Dakotah Revai, physics and astronomy major at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin, from Waupaca, Wisconsin

This research produced a device to visualize flow through inserted aortic valve prototypes between the simulated left ventricle and aorta for education and research. Replicating human heart valves for stroke volume, blood pressure, aortic compliance and heart rate resulted in the device pumping as a human heart would. Values of 70 mL, 120 mmHg, 1.47 ml/mmHg and 70 beats per minute were chosen, respectively. A pump made of polyvinyl chloride was created to move water through the system; compliance tests were performed on materials to find one that mimics the value of the human aorta. A left ventricle was designed for 3D printing.
Advisor: Dr. Jeff LaMack ’97, associate professor, biomedical engineering program director, MSOE

Additive Manufacturing as a Tool in the Development of Training Models for Ultrasound-guided Thyroid Biops

Allison Spaulding, biomedical engineering major at MSOE, from Waukesha, Wisconsin

Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsies are complicated medical procedures to perform. The goal of this research was to determine a process by which realistic models of the thyroid gland and surrounding structures can be manufactured for the purpose of training physicians. This was done by 3D printing molds of the thyroid gland and other relevant structures and filling these molds with gelatin mixtures to ultimately be assembled to form a final model. Multiple models were made to simulate several different types of thyroid nodules, providing physicians the most realistic training experience possible.
Advisor: Dr. Jeff LaMack ’97, associate professor, biomedical engineering program director, MSOE

An Investigation of a Mass Flow Rate Method for Evaluating the Filterability of Hydraulic Fluids

Tahseen Tabassum, chemical engineering major at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York, from Jamaica, New York

The ability of fluid to retain its filterability properties is critical for efficient, reliable machine performance. This is particularly true for biodegradable fluids used in environmentally sensitive areas. In this research, hydraulic fluids and lubricants of various base oil and additive composition were evaluated using a modified version of ISO 13357 that utilizes mass flow rate measurements to assess fluid filterability. A comparison of volumetric and mass flow rate filtration ratios revealed that the use of mass flow rate to determine filterability yields comparable results while improving test repeatability. These findings are the basis of a new ASTM standard to be proposed for the measurement of fluid filterability and compatibility.
Advisor: Paul Michael, research chemist, Fluid Power InstituteTM, MSOE

Analysis of Large Ferrous Particles in Hydraulic Fluids

Andrew Valesquez, mechanical engineering major at the University of California-Merced, from El Sereno, California

Analytical ferrography is a well-established method for determining iron concentrations in hydraulic fluids. However, it is a manual procedure that requires a trained technologist to interpret the results. A new automated ferrography method based upon twin magnetometers has been developed which counts the number of iron particles greater than 25 microns and calculates the total iron concentration in ppm. The ISO standard test dust, synthetic iron wear particles and hydraulic fluid field samples were evaluated in this automated system. Results were compared to manual ferrographic and emission spectroscopic techniques. The automated ferrography proved to be more effective in detecting large iron particles than emission spectroscopy, and it is comparable to the manual procedure.
Advisor: Paul Michael, research chemist, Fluid Power InstituteTM, MSOE

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling receives NSF award to implement teaching sessions

July 27th, 2017

2017_news_cbm_model2July 27, 2017 — The MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM) has received a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Improving Undergraduate STEM Education program (IUSE). The CBM will use the funds to implement a collaborative project with the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) that will connect students with educators and researchers in the biomolecular sciences.

With the help of the CBM, undergraduate members of ASBMB student chapters will create physical models of a protein that plays a key role in the research of a scientist who will be honored at the annual ASBMB meeting. Students then will bring their protein models to that meeting where they will attend the researcher’s award lecture, and meet him or her during an informal teaching session.

Following the teaching session at the annual meeting, faculty advisors of the ASBMB student chapters will attend a summer workshop on the Milwaukee School of Engineering campus to work with CBM staff to create student-centered instructional materials that will allow this topic to be introduced to other students in undergraduate bioscience classrooms.

This is the third NSF award to the CBM in support of projects like this. Previous projects by the CBM have shown that physical protein models stimulate meaningful conversations between experts (researchers) and novices (students).

Tim Herman, Ph.D., founder and director of the CBM, is principal investigator for this three-year, $600,000 award. Co-investigators include Margaret Franzen, Ph.D., and Diane Munzenmaier, Ph.D., both CBM program directors; and Cheryl Bailey, Ph.D., dean of Mount Mary University’s School of Natural and Health Sciences. Kim Cortes, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry at Kennesaw State University, will provide external evaluation for this project.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

 

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MSOE receives $935,000 gift from Oilgear-Ferris Foundation

July 19th, 2017

July 18, 2017 – Oilgear’s legacy in Milwaukee will live on at MSOE thanks to $935,000 gift from the Oilgear-Ferris Foundation. Representatives from the foundation presented a check to MSOE President John Y. Walz, Ph.D. on Tuesday, July 18 to create an endowed fund that will support student programs and projects, as well as scholarships for students in MSOE’s Mechanical Engineering Department.

20170718 Oil Gear-Ferris Foundation Ceremony_lr

From left, MSOE President John Walz, Ph.D., Oilgear-Ferris Foundation representatives Tom Price and David Zuege, and MSOE Mechanical Engineering Department Chair Matthew Panhans.

“MSOE is honored to carry on the investment Oilgear made in the community,” said Walz. “Endowed gifts such as this enable us to offer students additional scholarship and project support.”

Oilgear began in Milwaukee in 1921 out of a development project by engineers at the Bucyrus Co. Over the years, Oilgear grew into a global company and the world’s most demanding hydraulic control applications have relied on its high-performance fluid power solutions. Until 2015, the company’s location in Milwaukee was responsible for manufacturing pumps, hydraulic systems and other parts for industrial machinery and construction equipment.

The company was founded on a tradition of bringing only the most advanced engineering to its customers. Oilgear made an indelible impact on Milwaukee, providing many jobs for laborers, assemblers, machinists, engineers and business professionals for decades. For decades, Oilgear and the Oilgear-Ferris Foundation have financially supported MSOE. As the Oilgear-Ferris Foundation winds down, executives have elected to transfer the balance of the foundation to MSOE. With this gift, the foundation has created an endowment at MSOE to preserve the company’s legacy. The new Oilgear-Ferris Foundation Endowed Fund at MSOE will support mechanical engineering student projects, programs, organizations and scholarships.

“Oilgear was created by three engineers from a development project,” said David Zuege, former President/CEO, Oilgear Co. “We are very pleased that this endowment could support such projects and scholarships for mechanical engineering students.”

The gift comes at a time when MSOE’s Mechanical Engineering Department is growing. “We’ve doubled in size since 1998,” said Dr. Matthew Panhans, chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department.  “We have a lot of good potential uses for this gift that would help us deliver MSOE’s mission. The Oilgear legacy will continue on through the Oilgear-Ferris Foundation we will be good stewards.”

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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MSOE ranks among Best Colleges for Your Money

July 17th, 2017

July 17, 2017 – MSOE has been listed among the 2017-18 Best Colleges for Your Money by Money Magazine.

Money focused on the three basic factors that surveys show are the most important to parents and students: quality of education, affordability and outcomes. (Read the full methodology here.) MSOE was ranked 239 out of the 711 universities and colleges included in the list.

Money’s Best Colleges for Your Money rankings are the first to combine the most accurate pricing estimates available with all reliable indicators of alumni financial success, along with a unique analysis of how much “value” a college adds when compared to other schools that take in similar students.

MSOE is consistently ranked highly in a variety of categories by a number of organizations. Find more information on MSOE’s rankings here.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

 

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Outstanding alumni honored at annual reunion

July 14th, 2017

July 14, 2017 – MSOE’s annual Summer in the City reunion offers an opportunity for alumni and their families to visit campus, reminisce, and see what changes have occurred since their time at the university. The reunion also offers a chance to honor alumni for their individual successes and contributions to MSOE.

2017 Distinguished Alumni of the Year

This year’s Distinguished Alumni Award honors a husband and wife team who exemplify MSOE’s mission: Michael Barber ’82, ’12 (Hon.) and Jacqueline Herd-Barber ’84. Over the years, they have excelled in their respective professions and given generously of their time, talents and treasure—within the MSOE community and beyond.

Jackie Herd-Barber '84

Jackie Herd-Barber ’84

Jackie Herd-Barber made her mark on MSOE early, a co-founder of the university’s National Society of Black Engineers. After graduation in 1984 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, she embarked on a nearly 25-year career with Motorola. She held both direct and indirect sales management positions. By the time she retired in 2009, her accounts had included manufacturers across an array of diverse markets—from automotive to health care.

“I have many great memories about my time at MSOE,” Herd-Barber said. “I am very appreciative of the relationships I established with my professors, administrative staff and classmates – including my dear husband.”

Over the years Herd-Barber has been active in the MSOE community as an Alumni Association board member and a mentor in the Upward Bound program, encouraging students to pursue STEM careers. “I continue to mentor and Michael and I also provide financial support through a scholarship to increase the number of students in STEM fields.”

Herd-Barber has also served on several community and civic boards: she was campaign co-chair of the 2016 United Way of Greater Milwaukee and Waukesha County, immediate past chair of the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts; and past chair of the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Milwaukee Urban League and Rotary Club of Milwaukee. Currently, Herd-Barber is a member of the MSOE Corporation, and she serves on a number of boards including SaintA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Foundation, St. Anne’s Center for Intergenerational Care, the United Way of Greater Milwaukee, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Foundation, Federal Defender of Wisconsin, Black Arts MKE, Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation.

Herd-Barber has been recognized for her community contributions, which include induction in to the MSOE Wall of Fame (2006), Milwaukee Urban League Unity Award (honoree, 2013), Milwaukee Business Journal Woman of Influence (2014), Fellowship Open Community Volunteer (honoree, 2015), and Excellence in Education Award recipient (2016). She is also a member of the Milwaukee Chapter of the Links Inc. and Girlfriends Inc.

Dr. Michael Barber '82

Dr. Michael Barber ’82

Michael Barber, like his wife, earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. He graduated from MSOE in 1982 and over the course of his 30-plus-year career has had a variety of roles in engineering, operations and product management. He holds patents for novel X-ray system designs and has been directly involved with many product advances in the field of diagnostic testing.

Barber was the first leader for GE’s strategy on global health: healthymagination. Barber and his team delivered 50 products targeting cost, quality and access, while establishing key partnerships for GE in the cancer, maternal and newborn health, and emerging markets. Most recently, Barber serves as a GE officer and president and CEO of GE’s Molecular Imaging and Computed Tomography business. Molecular imaging looks at the biochemistry of disease by highlighting metastatic lesions, neurodegenerative disorders and cardiac function.

Barber is a champion of GE’s African American Forum, focused on professional development for African-American employees, and is the executive sponsor for the sustainability portion of GE’s $30 million philanthropic commitment to improve health care in sub-Saharan Africa.

Active in his professional associations, Barber serves on the board of Talix Inc. and the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME). In 2014, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and in 2009 he was named a Black Enterprise ‘Master of Innovation.’

Barber, who was the recipient of an Honorary Doctor of Engineering Degree from MSOE in 2012, continues to serve his alma mater on the Board of Regents.

The Barbers have two adult children, Dr. Lauren Barber, a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, and Justin, who completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and recently earned his MBA from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Lubar School of Business.

Alumni Achievement Awards

Dr. Eric Durant '98, P.E.

Dr. Eric Durant ’98, P.E.

Bringing real-world experience into the classroom is the goal of Dr. Eric Durant ’98, P.E. A professor and director of the computer engineering program, Durant has been on both the delivering and receiving end of an MSOE education. He earned bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering and computer engineering from MSOE in 1998. He continued his education at the University of Michigan, where he earned an M.S.E. in electrical engineering in 1999, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 2002. In 2011, he completed an executive MBA from UW-Milwaukee. He earned his P.E. certification in 2016. Durant was the recipient of the STEM Forward Young Engineer of the Year Award in 2013, which is presented annually to an outstanding contributor to the engineering profession from the greater Milwaukee area, and the MSOE Oscar Werwath Distinguished Teacher Award in 2016. During his time as an MSOE student, Durant said he benefitted from the mentorship of great faculty who took personal interest in their students. Since he joined the MSOE faculty in 2002, Durant in turn has provided mentorship not only as a teacher, but as advisor of MSOE’s SCOE Robotics and Photography Club. In addition to teaching, Durant is a senior DSP research engineer II and visiting professor at Starkey Hearing Technologies in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. He holds five U.S. patents based on this research. Durant is passionate about being an outstanding educator and mentor and staying technically current through research and work in industry.

Stephanie Johnson '00

Stephanie Johnson ’00

Having summited Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa and reached Mount Everest Base Camp in Nepal – it is quite possible that there is no mountain Stephanie Johnson ’00 can’t climb. After graduating from MSOE with a degree in industrial engineering, Johnson went on to earn her MBA from Meredith College in Raleigh, N.C. Since 2014, she has worked as manager of Global Training for John Deere in the Agriculture and Turf Division in Olathe, Kansas. Johnson points to her MSOE education for developing the problem-solving and leadership skills that have made her successful. Another important aspect of Johnson’s MSOE career was her involvement in sports: through her participation in volleyball and basketball Johnson made lifelong friendships and learned teamwork. When Johnson is not working she enjoys hiking, skiing, running and traveling the world. She often combines her love of running with traveling, completing 30 half marathons in locations around the world, and five full marathons – one in New Zealand and another in Asia. She has traveled to six of the seven continents, and lived in Singapore as part of her work for John Deere. No matter where her life takes her, Johnson said she will always love the Green Bay Packers.

Milwaukee School of Engineering is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97% placement rate; the highest ROI and average early and mid-career salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc.; and is highly ranked by organizations such as U.S. News and World Report, Forbes, Wall Street Journal and The Princeton Review. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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Student honored at ROV competition

July 14th, 2017

July 14, 2017 – An MSOE student who is passionate about building remotely operated vehicles was recently recognized by the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center. Jason Julius, mechanical engineering major, was the recipient of the Martin Klein MATE Mariner Medal, presented at the 2017 MATE international ROV competition.

MSOE_ROV 2017 Mate International team

From left: Jason Julius, Woodrow Walker, Robert Gillig, Allison Ahern

MSOE’s Underwater ROV  (remotely operated underwater vehicle) team was ranked 16th in the competition, which took place in Long Beach, California at the end of June. In addition to Julius, team members included electrical engineering majors Woodrow Walker, Robert Gillig and Allison Ahern.

Participants were tasked with building an ROV that could serve the Port of Long Beach by assisting with the installation of a Hyperloop system to expedite the delivery of goods and streamline commerce; conducting maintenance on the port’s water and light show to guarantee uninterrupted entertainment; identifying and collecting samples of contaminated sediment then remediating the area to protect the health of people and the environment; and identifying the contents of containers that fell off of a cargo ship into the harbor and mapping the accident site to ensure the safety of the port and its operations.

The Martin Klein MATE Mariner Medal is given to an individual or team that shows an outstanding passion, not just for winning, but for the whole competition process. This includes a genuine interest in the mission and a penchant for a lifetime interest in this field.

The MATE competition challenges K-12, community college, and university students from all over the world to design and build ROVs to tackle missions modeled after scenarios from the ocean workplace.  The competition’s class structure of beginner, intermediate, and advanced complements the education pipeline by providing students with the opportunity to build upon their skills – and the application of those skills – as they engineer increasingly more complex ROVs for increasingly more complex mission tasks.

MSOE is an independent, non-profit university with about 2,900 students that was founded in 1903. MSOE offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering, business and nursing. The university has a national academic reputation; longstanding ties to business and industry; dedicated professors with real-world experience; a 97 percent placement rate; and the highest ROI and average starting salaries of any Wisconsin university according to PayScale Inc. MSOE graduates are well-rounded, technologically experienced and highly productive professionals and leaders.

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